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By MICHAEL GISRIEL | May 26, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel: We live adjacent to a stream running through a woods. We hear that the woods may be developed. What are the rules regarding our rights to keep the stream in the same condition it is now?Ed VeitParktonDear Mr. Veit: As the owner of land under or bounded by a watercourse, you have rights in the waters that flow by your land, rights that have been recognized for hundreds of years. This rich tradition, which Maryland inherited as a former crown colony, is known as the "common law."
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Pat and Henry Bradley say their landlord decided to suddenly kick them out of his waterfront Dundalk house, changing the locks while they were still frantically trying to remove their belongings. The couple, who didn't have a lease, are to testify about their experience in Annapolis this week when House and Senate members convene hearings to decide whether to stop landlords and property owners from locking out residents without court orders and sheriff's deputies on standby to evict them.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | April 4, 1999
Most would say that the last thing baseball needs is more lawyers -- whether as agents negotiating obscene free agent contracts or as cell phone-toting season ticket holders taking up seats that could go to real fans.But the good citizens at the University of Maryland School of Law would have you consider the case of Hughie Jennings, who played for the Orioles of the 1890s and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1945.When it was learned that the shortstop briefly attended the law school, the Hughie Jennings Memorial Lecture was established as an Opening Day ritual, a legal first pitch tossed out a few blocks north of Camden Yards.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
Lead-paint bill would restore proper balance I believe it is ludicrous and irresponsible of The Sun's editors to pose as advocates for the at-risk youths in Baltimore while opposing corrections to legislation designed to address an overzealous court ruling that flies in the face of centuries of common law ("If it moves like a snake," editorial, Aug. 4). In fact, it is the at-risk children of our city who would benefit from the way the bill would modify the language of the law. The bill would recodify the responsibility of residents to notify their property managers of all types of damage because the residents occupy the property and thus are in the best position to know the up-to-the-minute conditions in it. Failure to promptly notify the property manager of problems only aggravates the harm to which residents and their families are exposed.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1991
LONDON -- In England, at last, a wife has the legal right to say no.The House of Lords gave her that right yesterday by finally repudiating a 255-year-old judicial principle that stated a man could not be guilty of raping his wife.The announcement of the final vote by the five law lords triggered an outburst of cheers and celebration among women who had gathered in the public gallery of the House of Lords to await the decision."The law lords have finally nailed a legal lie which has somehow survived for nearly three centuries," said Claire Glasman of Women Against Rape.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
What's in a name?The demise of a small business, if it's not protected.That has become the story of Gary Richard Shank, the former owner of a 27-year-old fishing, hunting and sporting goods shop in Essex. He has gone out of business, snuffed out by a 72-store chain that began opening stores in Maryland three years ago, he said.His undoing began at their introduction: Dick's Clothing and Sporting Goods Inc., meet Dick's Sporting Goods Inc.The latter is Shank's store started by his father, Richard.
NEWS
By Noam Neusner | April 12, 1991
On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Jon Lefkowitz is your average law student. He attends classes, catches up on his studying and worries about upcoming exams at the University of Maryland law school.But on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, he goes by the first name Shmuel and studies the Talmud, an ancient Jewish law code, at Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore.The Talmud spans thousands of pages and is one of the most important documents in Judaism, a compilation of both the laws and philosophy of that ancient faith.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a closely watched case, the Florida Supreme Court ruled yesterday that a pregnant woman may not be prosecuted for taking any action to harm or kill the fetus she is carrying.The decision threw out criminal charges against Kawana M. Ashley, a St. Petersburg woman who shot herself in the abdomen with a pistol when she was six months' pregnant because she did not want to have another child and could not afford an abortion.The shot wounded the fetus, who was delivered by Caesarean section and died 15 days later, too undeveloped to survive.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
U.S. District Senior Judge Alexander Harvey II yesterday dismissed a claim for punitive damages against Host Marriott Corp., but agreed to continue a bondholders' suit for $18 million in compensatory damages against the Bethesda-based hotel owner.At the end of the second week of testimony in a federal securities fraud case, Judge Harvey said there was not enough evidence to support a common law fraud claim against Host and its predecessor, the Marriott Corp., which has been accused of illegally concealing from bondholders plans to divide the company in two.Common law claims, which provide for punitive damages, are proven only by "clear and convincing" evidence.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear a modern bootlegging case from Maryland that raises the question of what role U.S. courts should play in helping to enforce the tax laws of other countries. The case involves three New York men convicted in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on wire fraud charges in a liquor smuggling operation that stretched from Maryland to Canada and cost the Canadian authorities millions in lost excise duties. At issue in the men's appeal of their 2001 convictions is a centuries-old common law, known as the revenue rule, which prohibits one country from enforcing in its courts the tax laws of another country.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear a modern bootlegging case from Maryland that raises the question of what role U.S. courts should play in helping to enforce the tax laws of other countries. The case involves three New York men convicted in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on wire fraud charges in a liquor smuggling operation that stretched from Maryland to Canada and cost the Canadian authorities millions in lost excise duties. At issue in the men's appeal of their 2001 convictions is a centuries-old common law, known as the revenue rule, which prohibits one country from enforcing in its courts the tax laws of another country.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
Mark Anthony Wimbush became the city's 120th homicide of 2003 when he died last month, but his killing will never be prosecuted - even though someone confessed in court to shooting him. Wimbush, then 16, was shot in the face at a party of teen-agers in 1978, suffering a near-mortal wound that left him paralyzed from the shoulders down. When he died of pneumonia on May 23, the state medical examiner's office determined the illness was a consequence of the shooting and classified his death as a homicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 24, 2001
John Mortimer was born in 1924. He long was a barrister -- to Americans a litigating, courtroom lawyer -- in general criminal and civil practice, as was his father. It's impossible to say how much he has written, especially if you count movies and television scripts, but there are 40 books listed at the beginning of "The Summer of a Dormouse: Another Part of Life" (Viking, 191 pages, $23.95), including the whole series of Rumpole courtroom novels, many familiar to Americans because of reruns here of the British television series.
NEWS
By George F. Will | May 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Five days after President Bush made his first judicial nominations, the Supreme Court did something serendipitous. In an ideologically interesting alignment, it produced yet another 5-4 decision in which Justice Sandra Day O'Connor wrote the majority opinion, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a vinegary dissent -- and the simmering controversy about the composition and function of courts was illuminated. At issue in the case from Tennessee was whether a defendant can constitutionally be prosecuted under a provision of law different from what existed when he committed his crime.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | April 4, 1999
Most would say that the last thing baseball needs is more lawyers -- whether as agents negotiating obscene free agent contracts or as cell phone-toting season ticket holders taking up seats that could go to real fans.But the good citizens at the University of Maryland School of Law would have you consider the case of Hughie Jennings, who played for the Orioles of the 1890s and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1945.When it was learned that the shortstop briefly attended the law school, the Hughie Jennings Memorial Lecture was established as an Opening Day ritual, a legal first pitch tossed out a few blocks north of Camden Yards.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
What's in a name?The demise of a small business, if it's not protected.That has become the story of Gary Richard Shank, the former owner of a 27-year-old fishing, hunting and sporting goods shop in Essex. He has gone out of business, snuffed out by a 72-store chain that began opening stores in Maryland three years ago, he said.His undoing began at their introduction: Dick's Clothing and Sporting Goods Inc., meet Dick's Sporting Goods Inc.The latter is Shank's store started by his father, Richard.
NEWS
By George F. Will | May 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Five days after President Bush made his first judicial nominations, the Supreme Court did something serendipitous. In an ideologically interesting alignment, it produced yet another 5-4 decision in which Justice Sandra Day O'Connor wrote the majority opinion, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a vinegary dissent -- and the simmering controversy about the composition and function of courts was illuminated. At issue in the case from Tennessee was whether a defendant can constitutionally be prosecuted under a provision of law different from what existed when he committed his crime.
NEWS
By JACK FRUCHTMAN JR | April 29, 1993
''From prehistoric times to the present, I believe, rape has played a critical function. It is nothing more or less than a conscious process of intimidation by which all men keep all women in a state of fear.''--Susan Brownmiller, ''Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape''''Women feel as much, if not more, traumatized by being raped by someone we have known, or trusted, someone we have shared at least an illusion of mutuality with, than by some stranger.''--Catharine A. MacKinnon, professor of law, University of MichiganWhen most people speak about rape, they can mean only one thing: rape is when a man has sexual intercourse with a woman to whom he has no right of access.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Theodore Stevens was convinced that his failing heart, worsening diabetes, growing dementia and the constant tingling in his legs were the result of an evil spell cast by his common-law wife of 20 years.He lived in fear that some unknown force sent by his wife would one day kill him.So one morning, Stevens, half-blind and still recovering from recent heart surgery, grabbed his .38-caliber pistol and shot her once in the chest.On Tuesday, a Common Pleas judge believed his voodoo defense.
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