Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommon
IN THE NEWS

Common

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | January 24, 2008
The Lyric Opera House will host Ladies Night Out featuring Common on Sunday night. The hip-hop artist, a member of the loose collective Soulquarians, worked with artists Kanye West, will.i.am., D'Angelo and Lily Allen for his latest album, Finding Forever, which hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and received multiple Grammy nominations. Common also branched out into film, having acted in Smokin' Aces and American Gangster. The concert starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $47.50-$97.50. The Lyric is at 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Commentator René Muller asserts that suicide is "an uncommon phenomenon" ( "Explaining the inexplicable: suicide," Sept. 23). Yet The most recent suicide data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control, in 2011, lists suicide as the 10th leading cause of death for Americans - a reported 39,518 people took their own lives that year. I say reported because death by suicide is under-reported for a variety of reasons - social stigma, religious and insurance concerns, and the difficulty in determining cause of death.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 10, 1996
The art of Ruth Channing and that of Jimmie Miller are not superficially a lot alike. Miller creates colorful mixed-media collages that are largely abstract but can also occasionally be read as representational, if you like. Channing's images are definitely representational. She is best known for her prints but lately has turned to painting.For their joint show at Resurgam, their artists' statements reveal something in common. "I should title my works "Enjoyment #1, Enjoyment #2, etc., because that's what they represent for me," writes Miller.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A plant shot up about 6 feet in our yard recently. I never saw flowers, but the seeds remind me of ragweed. The leaf is not lacy like ragweed, though. It looks more like a stork footprint. What am I dealing with? There is a bumper crop of ragweed this year, and you have a species known as giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida), as opposed to common ragweed (Ambrosia artemissiifolia). Unfortunately, giant ragweed pollen causes highly allergic reactions, just like the more familiar species.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Common Cause is an organization that the politicians hold in what might be called minimum high regard.It would be hard to argue that its goals are not worthwhile. Presumably, everyone is in favor of clean, democratic government responsive to ordinary Americans rather than those high-priced lobbyists in their Gucci loafers. But nobody likes holier-than-thou nags, and that is the way Common Cause is seen by the politicians who are so often its targets.The Common Cause assault on President Clinton the other night is a quintessential example.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Last year, while working on the independent film "LUV" in Baltimore, Common received the type of treatment typical for a celebrity of his stature. He met the mayor in her office. He played basketball at Carmelo Anthony's gym. But now, reflecting more than a year later, the 40-year-old Chicago-native born Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr. says it was meeting the people in their communities that made his brief time in Baltimore "one of the best experiences" the rapper and actor ever had. "I was in the heart and soul of Baltimore," said Common, who returns to the area Saturday for the Summer Spirit Festival at Merriweather Post Pavilion . "I definitely felt a connection to the people.
NEWS
November 6, 1990
Today, millions of American voters will go to the polls angry and despairing; more will simply not go at all. The sad fact is that confidence in America has been replaced by cynicism and distrust. The S&L catastrophe, the federal defic commitment of politicians, trust that the process really works.Common Cause was born 20 years ago in a political climate not unlike today's, when the U.S. was mired in the Vietnam War, the White House was about to be enveloped by scandal and confidence in government was ebbing.
NEWS
August 21, 1995
Columbia's Clemons Crossing is about as far as one can get from an urban area and not be in the country. There are no drive-by shootings, no strangers lurking in dark alleyways. It is a quintessential suburban neighborhood of comfortable homes on quiet, tree-lined cul-de-sacs -- a place sought after precisely because it seems so safe.But even the serenity of suburbia is occasionally shattered, and never so much as when a child is the victim.The tragic death of 8-year-old Simon Robert Decker of Clemons Crossing last Wednesday evening rips the veil off the illusion that "these things happen elsewhere."
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 30, 1994
Q: I suffer from severe headaches. I went to the eye doctor and he gave me some glasses but I still get the headaches. What could be causing them?A: Without knowing more about you and the kind of headaches that you're having, it's hard for us to give you a lot of information about what could be causing them. However, we do wish to point out that headaches are extremely common among teen-agers. In one study done in Maryland, approximately 65 percent of teen-agers indicated they had experienced a headache in the past four weeks.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | February 11, 2001
IT CAN'T happen in Glen Burnie. Or in Columbia. Or Owings Mills, Annapolis, Severna Park, Westminster - or any other Baltimore-area suburb. It can happen only in Baltimore. Only the city can be the main gravitational force in this metropolis' universe. Only in the city can the area rally around a common purpose that, if successful, everyone can cheer. Two weeks ago, we learned again that the long-neglected city can be the only true star in this solar system, no matter how much business is booming in Howard County or Hunt Valley.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission's decision this week to classify the ride-sharing service Uber as a common carrier is probably not the end of the story as to whether the company will continue its operations in Baltimore City and Annapolis. Uber has said it will appeal the decision, and the PSC itself ordered regulators to begin crafting new rules for for-hire companies in a tacit recognition of the changing nature of the industry. Ultimately, what needs to emerge is a compromise that allows consumers to continue to benefit from Uber's innovative business model (and others that may come after it)
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ruling that the popular ride-sharing company Uber Technologies is subject to the same regulations imposed on other for-hire vehicle services in the state, state regulators at the same time ordered a revision of those rules to reflect the changing business. The Maryland Public Service Commission ruled Wednesday that Uber is a common carrier like other for-hire car services, a decision that the company opposed, saying it threatened its business model. Yet the commission also ordered its staff to begin crafting new rules for such for-hire companies, saying it recognizes "that many industry changes and technological advances have occurred since these regulations were adopted, including the everyday use of the Internet.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A 17-year-old Woodbridge, Va., boy died Sunday evening of an apparent overdose, the second drug fatality following a Merriweather Post Pavilion concert on Friday, Howard County police said. The teen, whom police did not identify at the request of his family, was one of 20 hospitalized after the "Mad Decent Block Party" music festival at the Columbia venue. Authorities identified the man who died Saturday as Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C. Police do not believe the two knew each other.
NEWS
July 21, 2014
State officials deeply vested in new Common Core curriculum mandates and tests want us to believe that marked student declines on state tests since Common Core moved into place aren't Common Core's fault ( "MSA warning signs," July 14). Even though Common Core is supposed to be more difficult than previous tests, so far it is not causing children to ace the old tests. Rather, it's been the opposite. That's very odd. But there are two big, interdependent problems with the scenario now playing out in Maryland schools.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
State education officials told us that scores on this year's Maryland School Assessment exams would go down, and that they most certainly did. Schools state-wide embarked last fall on their first full year of instruction tied to the Common Core standards, but the tests this spring were still tied to the old curriculum. The mismatch was such an obvious issue that many, from parents to some candidates for governor, advocated skipping the tests altogether on the grounds that they would be a waste of time and money.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The mishandling of thousands of documents at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs delayed payments in excess of $25,000 to some veterans, according to new details made public Monday by the department's inspector general. Agency auditors reported widespread problems with records management in Baltimore in a three-page memo released in advance of a congressional hearing Monday evening. In one incident, they said, an employee was seen last month carrying veterans' claims folders in suitcases back to the office from her home.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | May 20, 1994
Common Cause/Maryland, the citizen watchdog group, yesterday called for an overhaul of Maryland campaign finance laws, saying businesses, unions and other special interests are exerting an undue influence on elections.Based on a computer analysis of contributions to six gubernatorial candidates between November 1990 and November 1993, Common Cause concluded that nearly half the money -- 46 percent -- came from businesses, political action committees, unions and lobbyists.The group said loopholes in current laws permit businesses to circumvent contribution limits, and that leisurely reporting deadlines make it difficult for the public to know in a timely fashion who gave how much to whom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine L. Fillat | November 22, 1991
CATONSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE800 S. Rolling Road. "Something in Common"Sandra Humberson and Phyllis E. Wright both work in silk-screen printing, hence the title of the show, but that's not where their commonality ends. Curator Jane Morais describes the prints as "jewel-like, with a kind of meticulousness." While Ms. Wright's works are on paper, Ms. Humberson prints sewing motifs on fabric for such creations as a child's dress or quilt. One wall features her installation of the results of needle book questionnaires sent to women artists throughout the country.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
The "new higher standards" that The Sun's editorial board has just discovered as it defends the Common Core are of great interest to those who were responsible for the learning program of students for the past 50 years ( "In defense of Common Core," June 27). It is also an incredible insult to those of us who developed the curriculum and the thousands of dedicated teachers who implemented it and fostered critical thinking routinely in their classrooms. It is not new to the classroom teacher that if a second grade child needs a more challenging text, it is integrated into their program to meet their individual needs.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 3, 2014
The celebration of America's birthday rarely includes references to Thomas Paine, the author of the pre-Revolutionary War pamphlet "Common Sense. " But Paine's role in the break with Great Britain was important, and his life has a way of reminding us that our nation has had enormous tolerance for wayward individuals - a sobering contrast to the consistent propriety exemplified by history-makers such as George Washington or John Adams. Paine was born in 1737 in Thetford, a village 70 miles northeast of London, the son of a staymaker or corsetmaker.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.