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By Edward Lee | November 29, 2012
While the Ravens have reason to feel good about their 9-2 record - a mark good enough for what would be the No. 2 seed in the AFC if the playoffs began this week - the positive vibes are not universal among the players on offense. The offense has scored just one touchdown in its last 10 quarters, including the overtime period in Sunday's 16-13 win against the San Diego Chargers. Prior to quarterback Joe Flacco's 4-yard strike to tight end Dennis Pitta with 4:19 left in the fourth quarter, the offense's last score had occurred in the third quarter of the team's 55-20 rout of the Oakland Raiders on Nov. 11 when Flacco connected with wide receiver Torrey Smith for a 20-yard score.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As the  Ravens  cleaned out their lockers in January after an 8-8 season, several players spoke about how they expected to be back in Baltimore in 2014. But while  Ed Dickson  said Charm City will always be his “first love,” he seemed resigned to the fact that his days here were done. Two months later, free agency hasn't treated the athletic but maddeningly inconsistent tight end kindly. Dickson has drawn interest from teams like the  Jacksonville Jaguars  and  New York Jets ,  according to my colleague Aaron Wilson , but a lucrative contract or a prime job opportunity apparently hasn't presented itself.
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BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2006
What timing! After the thrill of commodities during the last four years, the first commodity exchange-traded fund made its debut on the American Stock Exchange last week, during a time when investors were having second thoughts about everything from oil to metals. The Deutsche Bank Commodity Index Tracking Fund began trading Monday - giving investors an easy way to make a quick commodity investment. But on Tuesday and Wednesday, crude oil, heating oil and gasoline fell to the lowest levels since the end of last year, and copper dropped 2.3 percent Tuesday, as investors worried about increasing supplies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
It's been open for less than a month, but The Nickel Taphouse has already established itself as a North Baltimore favorite. People have really taken to the new joint from Robbin Haas, whose Birroteca, which opened last fall, was a similar instant hit. The two places don't have much in common as far as cuisine. Birroteca serves rustic Italian food, while The Nickel Taphouse offers tavern fare. But the attitude is the same, and so is the extraordinary confidence governing every aspect of the restaurants' operations, starting with their physical design.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | December 28, 1993
It's kind of like this -- you want to be the best grandparent TC ever. But I have found out over the years you have to know how to be a good parent first. There's a narrow line between interference, suggestion and helpfulness.As a grandparent, you have to be sensitive to your own children's wishes as to how they want to parent -- abide by their requests, that is, if you want peace, not war.As practicing grandparents, we have to have endless patience, exceptional hearing, eyes in the back of our heads and know when to skip it and when to zip it -- our opinions, that is.You have to make up your mind whether to admonish, cajole or just say NO when you are with your grandchildren and their parents.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Eileen Ambrose and Bill Atkinson and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission said yesterday that it has filed a seven-count injunctive action against a Forest Hill money manager who solicited more than $2 million from investors and allegedly misappropriated the funds. According to the Washington-based CFTC, Peter Scott admitted to auditors with the National Futures Association that he "used investor funds to pay for personal expenses," including a Ford truck. He also admitted that he paid himself more than $900,000 in total, according to the CFTC.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno | March 13, 2005
Wall Street has been developing a better appreciation for classic smokestack businesses for the past two years, as the U.S. economy has revived and as China and other emerging economies have stoked demand for raw materials and all sorts of industrial goods. Lately, however, appreciation of commodity-related stocks has given way to near-panic buying. Some investors who paid no attention to these issues for a decade or longer - if ever - now seem willing to pay any price to get into them.
BUSINESS
By WALTER HAMILTON and WALTER HAMILTON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2006
Wall Street suffered its biggest sell-off in nearly four months yesterday as rising oil and commodity prices stoked fears that inflationary pressure is building and that the Federal Reserve might continue to push up interest rates. Only a day before, the Dow Jones industrial average had edged to within 80 points of a record close. But rising energy costs, lower-than-expected retail sales numbers and lingering concerns about the Fed's direction combined yesterday to send stocks broadly lower.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 2, 1992
BEIJING -- China announced yesterday that it will decontrol prices of grain -- its most politically sensitive commodity -- throughout most of the country within two to three years.Beyond reflecting concerns over the ability of the world's most populous nation to continue to largely feed itself in the future, the move represents a major step toward creating a market economy here.It follows recent aggressive steps to give Chinese state-run enterprises more autonomy, reduce mandatory state industrial and agricultural plans, open more sectors of China's economy to foreign investment and trade, and step up deregulation of the prices of a wide range of long subsidized goods.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 7, 1991
So far all that has transpired is the posting of the "For Sale" sign. The Baltimore Orioles are a good buy at any price. They represent an elegant baseball property. They are progressing with a developmental-player program that bodes promise for the future, when the team will be housed in a new downtown park with customers fighting to buy tickets.Owner Eli Jacobs, who has directed the franchise for 2 1/3 seasons, says he's considering a sale. Action is not imminent. Realistically, it could take from two months to a year, preferably within the shorter time frame because of the trauma drawn-out proceedings create.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Federal regulators investigating Exelon's Constellation commodities group say they have "preliminarily determined" that the division violated market-behavior rules. The brief notice, filed Friday by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said only that the alleged violations involve not providing accurate information to a power grid operator, the California Independent System Operator. FERC declined to comment. Constellation, the Baltimore energy company bought by Chicago-based Exelon last year, downplayed the investigation.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 29, 2012
While the Ravens have reason to feel good about their 9-2 record - a mark good enough for what would be the No. 2 seed in the AFC if the playoffs began this week - the positive vibes are not universal among the players on offense. The offense has scored just one touchdown in its last 10 quarters, including the overtime period in Sunday's 16-13 win against the San Diego Chargers. Prior to quarterback Joe Flacco's 4-yard strike to tight end Dennis Pitta with 4:19 left in the fourth quarter, the offense's last score had occurred in the third quarter of the team's 55-20 rout of the Oakland Raiders on Nov. 11 when Flacco connected with wide receiver Torrey Smith for a 20-yard score.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
The Sun editorializes that "the incumbent is a known commodity" ("Who is Mitt Romney?" Aug. 28), and that is President Barack Obama's problem - he is a known commodity. His record is no record. "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. " Norman Wolfe, Pikesville
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Judith S. Campbell, a retired commodity futures broker, died of multiple sclerosis Monday at her Parkton home. She was 61. Judith Sheffield was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale. After graduating from Overlea High School in 1969, she earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from what is now Towson University. While living in Denver, Mrs. Campbell became a licensed commodity futures broker. In the 1970s, she joined Campbell & Co. in Baltimore, which had been co-founded by her husband, Kevin B. Campbell, in 1972.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
The refrain was the same from both Orioles manager Buck Showalter and new club executive vice president Dan Duquette . They are holding out hope that leadoff hitter and second baseman Brian Roberts will be able to return to his all-star form in 2012. But both men admit it's impossible to predict if Roberts will be on the field, since he has played in just 98 games in the past two seasons, primarily because of concussion symptoms. "We don't have any reason to think one way or another.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2011
I'm with you, Huck. I couldn't agree more with Mike Huckabee, who dissed Natalie Portman last week. Portman, outrageously, won the best actress Oscar for her pinched-face, baby-voiced mewling as a tortured ballerina in "Black Swan. " A travesty! Especially when obviously the award should have gone to Jennifer Lawrence as a tough backwoods girl battling her extended meth-brewing clan to save her own family in "Winter's Bone. " What? What's that you say? Huckabee actually was slamming Portman not for her undeserved statuette but for the unwed actress' baby bump?
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 1996
DERRY, N.H. -- Here in Robert Frost country, Phil Gramm is stopping by a Chamber of Commerce breakfast on a snowy morning.At no less than the Promises to Keep restaurant, the bareknuckle presidential candidate takes a seat before the handful of residents who've come to see him -- and launches into soft, velvety verse:"Whose woods these are I think I know," he begins, reciting one of the classic Frost poems. "His house is in the village though;/He will not see me stopping here/To watch his woods fill up with snow."
NEWS
August 29, 2012
The Sun editorializes that "the incumbent is a known commodity" ("Who is Mitt Romney?" Aug. 28), and that is President Barack Obama's problem - he is a known commodity. His record is no record. "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. " Norman Wolfe, Pikesville
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2011
Consumers might soon see a rise in the price of spice. Spice company McCormick & Co. said Wednesday that an increase in the cost of commodities such as dehydrated garlic, black pepper and cinnamon will likely result in higher prices for spices on grocery shelves. The company has raised the price of spices it sells to restaurants and retailers by 3 percent. "There is just so much food commodity inflation right now that we expect that we'll see that flow through to the shelf," Alan D. Wilson, McCormick's chairman and CEO, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
While cargo volume at Baltimore's public marine terminals fell slightly in the past fiscal year, key commodities at the port are rebounding after the recession, state officials reported Wednesday. Two cargo categories saw steep declines in the fiscal year that ended in June — farm and construction equipment dropped 31 percent and paper products fell 27 percent. Overall, the port handled 9.1 million tons of cargo in the past fiscal year compared with 9.2 million tons the year earlier.
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