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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency's conflicting accounts about the possible exposure of U.S. troops to chemical weapons shortly after the 1991 Persian Gulf war could create the first significant hurdle to the confirmation of George Tenet as the agency's director, congressional officials said yesterday.The chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Republican Sen. Richard C. Shelby of Alabama, said through a spokeswoman that the committee was "very concerned" about the handling of the issue by the CIA and that "the committee is definitely looking into this" as it prepares for confirmation hearings for Tenet, who is now the deputy director of central intelligence.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting the deep divisions within Congress over granting legal immunity to telephone companies for cooperating with the Bush administration's program of wiretapping without warrants, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a new domestic surveillance law yesterday that sidestepped the issue. By a 10-9 vote, the committee approved an overhaul of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that dropped a key provision for immunity for telecommunications companies that another committee had already approved.
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NEWS
By MARY CURTIUS and MARY CURTIUS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- With pressure mounting on the Bush administration over its detainee policies, Republican House and Senate leaders are asking for an investigation into who leaked information to The Washington Post about secret CIA prisons abroad. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee and House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois requested that the Senate and House intelligence committees "immediately initiate a joint investigation into the possible release of classified information to the media" about the existence of the prisons.
NEWS
By Loch K. Johnson | December 8, 2006
ATHENS, Ga. -- As soon as it became apparent that Democrats had won majorities in both chambers of Congress, Harry Reid of Nevada, who will become the new Senate majority leader in January, declared: "I believe that the first order of business when we reorganize after the first of the year is congressional oversight." He acknowledged that "there simply has been no oversight in recent years." In fact, oversight has long been a neglected task of Congress. "The purpose of oversight is to keep bureaucrats from doing something stupid," former U.S. Sen. Wyche Fowler Jr., Democrat of Georgia, wryly observed after his many years in Congress.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top intelligence official said yesterday that major espionage investigations are under way at the CIA and elsewhere in the government, prompted by information from the archives and from agents of defunct Soviet and Eastern European spy services.R. James Woolsey, the director of central intelligence, said that "a large number of leads with respect to people who undertook espionage during the Cold War, in this country and in other countries," is under investigation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The director of central intelligence said yesterday that he was wrong when he said there were many espionage cases that would be brought against people within the government.The director, R. James Woolsey, said in a televised interview on Tuesday that there "absolutely" would be "a fair number of espionage cases" against people at several different government agencies. He repeated the assertion several times.But yesterday, in a brief interview outside a Senate hearing room, Mr. Woolsey said he had erred.
NEWS
By Loch K. Johnson | December 8, 2006
ATHENS, Ga. -- As soon as it became apparent that Democrats had won majorities in both chambers of Congress, Harry Reid of Nevada, who will become the new Senate majority leader in January, declared: "I believe that the first order of business when we reorganize after the first of the year is congressional oversight." He acknowledged that "there simply has been no oversight in recent years." In fact, oversight has long been a neglected task of Congress. "The purpose of oversight is to keep bureaucrats from doing something stupid," former U.S. Sen. Wyche Fowler Jr., Democrat of Georgia, wryly observed after his many years in Congress.
NEWS
By Marvin C. Ott | June 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - The two congressional committees that oversee America's intelligence agencies have begun what promise to be riveting hearings into what went wrong before Sept. 11. There is nothing that Congress likes better than a high-profile investigation into executive branch ineptitude and/or malfeasance. Which is not to say such inquiries are not serious business and hard work; they are both. But as Congress bores into the growing body of evidence that the CIA, the FBI and other components of the intelligence community dropped the ball, there will be a ghost at the party that it will try hard to ignore: the unacknowledged failure of congressional oversight itself.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | March 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A Guatemalan military officer who ordered the killings of an American citizen and a guerrilla leader married to an American lawyer was a paid agent of the CIA, a member of the House Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday.The intelligence agency knew about the killings ordered by the Guatemalan colonel on its payroll, but concealed its knowledge for years, the committee member, Democratic Rep. Robert G. Torricelli of New Jersey said in a letter he sent to President Clinton yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A former Central Intelligence Agency official asserted in Senate hearings yesterday that Robert M. Gates actively suppressed dissent, slanted intelligence conclusions and intimidated analysts who disagreed with his views in his years as a senior intelligence official, according to people familiar with testimony he presented before a closed session of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.Democrats on the committee immediately seized on the accusations, documented with classified internal agency analyses and memorandums made available to the Senate panel.
NEWS
By MARY CURTIUS and MARY CURTIUS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- With pressure mounting on the Bush administration over its detainee policies, Republican House and Senate leaders are asking for an investigation into who leaked information to The Washington Post about secret CIA prisons abroad. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee and House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois requested that the Senate and House intelligence committees "immediately initiate a joint investigation into the possible release of classified information to the media" about the existence of the prisons.
NEWS
August 17, 2002
Giving away security secrets is serious crime The Sun refers to the current FBI investigation into the unauthorized disclosure of national security information as a farce and an absurdity ("Curtains for FBI farce," editorial, Aug. 7). But it is The Sun's ignorance or deliberate misrepresentation of the situation that could be considered absurd or farcical, if this were not such a serious matter. The FBI is not conducting a wide-ranging investigation of congressional leaks. It is attempting to determine which members of Congress or their staff members betrayed their obligation to safeguard sensitive intelligence material and, in so doing, violated not only their oath to protect this material but also U.S. laws governing its disclosure.
NEWS
By Marvin C. Ott | June 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - The two congressional committees that oversee America's intelligence agencies have begun what promise to be riveting hearings into what went wrong before Sept. 11. There is nothing that Congress likes better than a high-profile investigation into executive branch ineptitude and/or malfeasance. Which is not to say such inquiries are not serious business and hard work; they are both. But as Congress bores into the growing body of evidence that the CIA, the FBI and other components of the intelligence community dropped the ball, there will be a ghost at the party that it will try hard to ignore: the unacknowledged failure of congressional oversight itself.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency's conflicting accounts about the possible exposure of U.S. troops to chemical weapons shortly after the 1991 Persian Gulf war could create the first significant hurdle to the confirmation of George Tenet as the agency's director, congressional officials said yesterday.The chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Republican Sen. Richard C. Shelby of Alabama, said through a spokeswoman that the committee was "very concerned" about the handling of the issue by the CIA and that "the committee is definitely looking into this" as it prepares for confirmation hearings for Tenet, who is now the deputy director of central intelligence.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | March 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A Guatemalan military officer who ordered the killings of an American citizen and a guerrilla leader married to an American lawyer was a paid agent of the CIA, a member of the House Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday.The intelligence agency knew about the killings ordered by the Guatemalan colonel on its payroll, but concealed its knowledge for years, the committee member, Democratic Rep. Robert G. Torricelli of New Jersey said in a letter he sent to President Clinton yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- R. James Woolsey vowed to "change the culture" of the Central Intelligence Agency. It now appears that the culture got to him first, officials say, and whoever takes on his unfinished job faces the enormous task of reshaping and renewing the CIA and the rest of the nation's intelligence agencies from the ground up.A caretaker who will keep the nation's secret services out of the headlines is not enough, White House and congressional officials say....
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting the deep divisions within Congress over granting legal immunity to telephone companies for cooperating with the Bush administration's program of wiretapping without warrants, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a new domestic surveillance law yesterday that sidestepped the issue. By a 10-9 vote, the committee approved an overhaul of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that dropped a key provision for immunity for telecommunications companies that another committee had already approved.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- President-elect Bill Clinton me yesterday with candidates for top administration jobs -- Rep. Bill Richardson of New Mexico and former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt -- and said he was close to a decision on a "few" Cabinet appointments.He reacted cautiously to a report of surprisingly strong economic growth in the third quarter of this year, saying the economic picture remains muddy."But it could have some impact on short-term judgments," he said, referring to the issue of whether the economy will require an immediate stimulus of government spending when he takes office.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The director of central intelligence said yesterday that he was wrong when he said there were many espionage cases that would be brought against people within the government.The director, R. James Woolsey, said in a televised interview on Tuesday that there "absolutely" would be "a fair number of espionage cases" against people at several different government agencies. He repeated the assertion several times.But yesterday, in a brief interview outside a Senate hearing room, Mr. Woolsey said he had erred.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top intelligence official said yesterday that major espionage investigations are under way at the CIA and elsewhere in the government, prompted by information from the archives and from agents of defunct Soviet and Eastern European spy services.R. James Woolsey, the director of central intelligence, said that "a large number of leads with respect to people who undertook espionage during the Cold War, in this country and in other countries," is under investigation.
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