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By Mary Maushard | May 12, 1992
Sendak highlights Week of the Working ParentJust ahead is the 1992 Maryland Week of the Working Parent, and though it isn't a week for parents to just lay back, as they really want to do, it is a week of attention and appreciation. And a week to plan for, while there's still time. The Week of the Working Parent is May 25-30; here are a couple of highlights:Children's author and illustrator Maurice Sendak will discuss his work in art, theater and children's literature during "Maurice Sendak on Stage" May 27 at the Peabody Institute.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
Sandra "Sandy" Skolnik ardently believed the young children of working parents needed to learn something new and worthwhile every day. In the past three decades, she became a determined and articulate advocate for quality child care and education for the very young. The longtime executive director of the Maryland Committee for Children died of lung cancer Wednesday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 69 and lived in Mount Washington. "She was a visionary and a pioneer," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
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NEWS
April 3, 1992
Free assistance to people qualifying for the federal earned income credit will be offered the next two Saturdays by the University of Baltimore Professional Accounting Society, in conjunction with the United Way and Maryland Committee for Children.Those who are eligible for the federal reimbursement have one or more children and earned income not exceeding $21,250.The help in obtaining the earned income credit will be provided from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow, and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 11, in the university's Charles Hall, Room 137, at the intersection of Charles Street and Mount Royal Avenue.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2003
A statewide network of resource centers that advocates say is critical to maintaining the quality of day care for young children would virtually be eliminated under proposed state budget cuts. Funding for the group of 13 centers, overseen by the Maryland Committee for Children, is to be slashed by 70 percent in the fiscal 2004 budget proposed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. -- a reduction that those who operate the centers say they could not sustain. Some things the committee does to help parents -- such as maintaining an online, searchable database of child care providers -- could survive the cuts, said Sandra Skolnik, executive director of the Maryland Committee for Children.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 5, 1996
The Goldseker Foundation awarded $2.1 million in 1995 to 55 nonprofit Baltimore-area institutions, including 20 past recipients who received $10,000 each in honor of the foundation's 20th anniversary this year.Foundation President Timothy D. Armbruster said the 20 were chosen for "special recognition" from among 269 past recipients.The 20 included Action for the Homeless, Advocates for Children and Youth, Baltimore Educational Scholarship Trust, Citizens Planning and Housing Agency, Comprehensive Housing Assistance Corp.
FEATURES
April 10, 1992
In a survey with few surprises, the Maryland Committee for Children found that the state's child care workers receive low pay and few benefits, making it difficult for day care center operators to attract and keep competent staffs and ensure quality care for young children.Here are a few highlights:* A day care teacher in Maryland makes an average of $13,229 a year, or $6.36 an hour, according to the study conducted in 1990 and '91.By comparison, a first-year teacher in Maryland -- with a college degree but no experience -- earns between $21,000 and $27,000, depending on where she teaches, says Ron Peiffer, spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education.
FEATURES
April 10, 1992
In a survey with few surprises, the Maryland Committee for Children found that the state's childcare workers receive low pay and few benefits, making it difficult for day care center operators to attract and keep competent staffs and ensure quality care for young children.Here are a few highlights:* A day care teacher in Maryland makes an average of $13,229 a year, or $6.36 an hour, according to the study conducted in 1990 and '91.By comparison, a first-year teacher in Maryland -- with a college degree but no experience -- earns between $21,000 and $27,000, depending on where she teaches, says Ron Peiffer, spokesman RTC for the Maryland State Department of Education.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | May 6, 1991
Last year the Rouse Company inaugurated a program allowing working parents employed by the firm to use their own sick leave when a child was home ill. No longer do Rouse employees have to pretend they're sick to stay home with an ailing child.Although a relatively small step -- far less elaborate than creating an on-site day-care center -- the move was applauded by employees with small children, recalls William Boden, head of Human Resources at Columbia-based Rouse."People were happy they didn't have to fib about the situation.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2003
A statewide network of resource centers that advocates say is critical to maintaining the quality of day care for young children would virtually be eliminated under proposed state budget cuts. Funding for the group of 13 centers, overseen by the Maryland Committee for Children, is to be slashed by 70 percent in the fiscal 2004 budget proposed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. -- a reduction that those who operate the centers say they could not sustain. Some things the committee does to help parents -- such as maintaining an online, searchable database of child care providers -- could survive the cuts, said Sandra Skolnik, executive director of the Maryland Committee for Children.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
In a fuchsia shirt and color-coordinated tie, Cockeysville metal- smith David Paul Bacharach cheerfully holds court in his prime corner booth at the American Craft Fair in the Convention Center.He greets a friend with a peck on the cheek while meticulously arranging earrings in a glass case and describing to another visitor the melting pot of influences found in his work. Such finesse comes readily to Mr. Bacharach, one of the godfathers of the national crafts craze.He was there in 1965, when New England artisans converged in a Vermont ski resort to sell their wares.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Therese Weil Lansburgh, a social worker who was a pioneer in children's day care, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 81 and a resident of University Parkway. Mrs. Lansburgh was president of the Maryland Committee for Children for two decades through the mid-1980s, and a day care advocate during the 1960s. The traditional extended family, with grandparents at home, was a thing of the past, she pointed out, and young children needed a "warm and acceptable" place to stay while their parents worked.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | May 28, 2000
They are the Harry Potters of the business, the underdogs using both fantastical and practical means to their advantage as they try to lure ever-younger readers into the fold. They are the few, the scattered, the children's independent bookstores. Thanks to Harry-mania, attention has been lavished on children's books, and children's bookstores are reaping the benefits too. Devoted entirely to the literary needs of the young, these places offer what bigger stores often don't -- a knowledgeable staff, a diverse inventory of both new and older titles, and a willingness to buck retailing trends by staying small.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
In a society that has seen an erosion of the role of fatherhood, maybe it's time young men began learning its skills right alongside civics and shop in school, says renowned psychiatrist Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint."
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
Reece Guth's elegant junk room on Water Street is a recycling wonderland that can turn television-dulled kids into artists and blase adults into kids.Here the 39-year-old former potter also turns trash into art, such as a shrine to the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia.Where else could you see in one room barrels of toilet plungers, keys, foam rubber tubes, silver paper slivers, foam bits, balls of string, wooden dowels, jar covers, window slats, plastic tubes, buttons and film canisters?And, in the same spot, creations made from the raw materials -- 6-foot wind socks, collages and mobiles, 3-foot totem poles, a box designed for a monkey, puppets, beanbag games, a skeleton with an "I love you" sign and dozens of other doodads made by young, inventive minds.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 5, 1996
The Goldseker Foundation awarded $2.1 million in 1995 to 55 nonprofit Baltimore-area institutions, including 20 past recipients who received $10,000 each in honor of the foundation's 20th anniversary this year.Foundation President Timothy D. Armbruster said the 20 were chosen for "special recognition" from among 269 past recipients.The 20 included Action for the Homeless, Advocates for Children and Youth, Baltimore Educational Scholarship Trust, Citizens Planning and Housing Agency, Comprehensive Housing Assistance Corp.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | May 29, 1995
The gray, Buster Brown wig has been replaced by white hair of his own. And he's wearing a camel's hair sport coat instead of that bright red jacket with giant patch pockets. He carries a speech instead of a jingling ring of keys.But as soon as you hear that whispery, breathy voice, pingpong balls rain on your head and you realize, "It is Captain Kangaroo!"Suddenly, memories blink awake like Grandfather Clock. Even though you have your own Bunnyrabbit now -- a willful child who pushes all your buttons -- you feel as if you are back in a black-and-white, small-screen time.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Therese Weil Lansburgh, a social worker who was a pioneer in children's day care, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 81 and a resident of University Parkway. Mrs. Lansburgh was president of the Maryland Committee for Children for two decades through the mid-1980s, and a day care advocate during the 1960s. The traditional extended family, with grandparents at home, was a thing of the past, she pointed out, and young children needed a "warm and acceptable" place to stay while their parents worked.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
At $23,000 a year, a family with children doesn't have a lot of spare change to cover the monthly grind of groceries, utilities and other essentials, much less a little extra with which to face the inevitable emergencies of life. These are usually the families we call the "working poor," families that earn a living but whose wages barely keep them above the poverty level. In some cases, they might even be better off on welfare -- with Medicaid and other benefits -- but they'd rather work than accept public assistance.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
In a fuchsia shirt and color-coordinated tie, Cockeysville metal- smith David Paul Bacharach cheerfully holds court in his prime corner booth at the American Craft Fair in the Convention Center.He greets a friend with a peck on the cheek while meticulously arranging earrings in a glass case and describing to another visitor the melting pot of influences found in his work. Such finesse comes readily to Mr. Bacharach, one of the godfathers of the national crafts craze.He was there in 1965, when New England artisans converged in a Vermont ski resort to sell their wares.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
At $23,000 a year, a family with children doesn't have a lot of spare change to cover the monthly grind of groceries, utilities and other essentials, much less a little extra with which to face the inevitable emergencies of life. These are usually the families we call the "working poor," families that earn a living but whose wages barely keep them above the poverty level. In some cases, they might even be better off on welfare -- with Medicaid and other benefits -- but they'd rather work than accept public assistance.
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