Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommittee Chairman
IN THE NEWS

Committee Chairman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The chairman of a key state senate committee said Friday he believes a “consensus” speed camera reform bill has a “good chance” of passing this year, after an effort failed last year on the General Assembly's final night. Sen. Brian Frosh, of Montgomery County, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he believes lawmakers will begin work on speed cameras with legislation that passed the House but never got voted on in the Senate. “It had the votes to pass last year,” said Frosh, a candidate for Attorney General.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The chairman of a key state senate committee said Friday he believes a “consensus” speed camera reform bill has a “good chance” of passing this year, after an effort failed last year on the General Assembly's final night. Sen. Brian Frosh, of Montgomery County, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he believes lawmakers will begin work on speed cameras with legislation that passed the House but never got voted on in the Senate. “It had the votes to pass last year,” said Frosh, a candidate for Attorney General.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 12, 1998
New Windsor Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. recently presented the first Mayor's Award to resident Jack Coe.Coe, the town's planning committee chairman and town plumber, was recognized for his dedication to the town.The town presented Coe with a plaque.FireNew Windsor: Firefighters responded at 7: 34 a.m. Thursday to burning electrical wires on Route 31 at Church Road. Units were out 12 minutes.Pub Date: 10/12/98
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Del. Joseph F. Vallario Jr., the Prince George's County Democrat who chairs the House Judiciary Committee, is the frequent target of accusations that his public role and private interests conflict. That criticism usually boils down to a disagreement with his views on legislation and anger at his willingness to use his power to bottle up bills he doesn't like. But a complaint filed against him with the legislature's ethics committee is different; it centers on discussions about a piece of legislation that became law (in fact, one he voted for)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
The chairman of the powerful House Appropriations Committee proposed what he called a five-year, $317 million education aid package for Prince George's County yesterday, but coupled it with a demand for "accountability" such as the state imposed on Baltimore schools earlier this year.A leading Prince George's legislator described the proposal as "gratuitously divisive and inflammatory" and said the actual new spending in the package comes to about $90 million.Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, raised the politically charged issue in a letter dated yesterday to Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
As chairman of the NCAA men's basketball tournament selection committee, Jim Livengood is livin' dangerously. How else do you explain some of the decisions Livengood and his committee made in seeding the 65 teams for this year's tournament? Considering that Liven- good's day job is as athletic director at the University of Arizona, there's a good chance his most valued employee, basketball coach Lute Olson, might have reason to be a little miffed for the company the top-seeded Wildcats were given in the West Regional.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
Supporters of a proposal to ban discrimination against gay men and lesbians in Maryland picked up a key vote yesterday when Sen. Leo E. Green said he will back the legislation. "I would vote in favor of it with the amendments I've worked on," the Prince George's County Democrat said in an interview. "I can support it now." Until yesterday, Green had been one of two undecided senators on the 11-member Judicial Proceedings Committee - the General Assembly panel seen as controlling the measure's fate.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening deftly cleared an obstruction to his environmental agenda yesterday by naming a longtime legislative adversary to a powerful regulatory position. Del. Ron Guns, a conservative Cecil County Democrat, will quit the General Assembly and resign from his full-time job with telecommunications giant Verizon to fill a vacancy on the state Public Service Commission. The position pays $93,600 a year. Since 1991, Guns has served as chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, which had become a graveyard for bills on water quality and other environmental issues.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | March 24, 2006
As a landmark air pollution bill heads for a critical vote today, a flash point for debate is a loophole that would allow power plants to avoid penalties if the cost of adding filters "may significantly increase electric rates." Senate Finance Committee Chairman Thomas M. Middleton, who has a power plant in his Southern Maryland district, inserted the language into the Healthy Air Act before it was approved 33-14 last week by the Senate. Middleton, a Democrat who has received at least $7,750 in campaign contributions from the power industry since 1999, said he added the "safety valve" to protect customers, given the uproar over a large rate increase expected this summer because of the deregulation of electric utilities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 24, 2005
Thirty-one lawyers, including a former judge and former Republican committee chairman for the county, are seeking 10-year appointments to two positions on the District Court bench. At least seven candidates are current or former prosecutors, at least two were unsuccessful Republican candidates for local office and one is a federal EPA lawyer. Several are past applicants for judgeships. David S. Bruce, a former District Court judge appointed to Circuit Court, lost a race in November to retain his position on the Circuit Court.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh, Tribune Newspapers | July 26, 2011
While the first official test event for the 2012 Olympics was taking place nearby, local sports fans Neal Weekes and Gordon Cunningham were talking about the Summer Games over a beer at the Mitre Hotel pub in Greenwich. "Greatest thing ever to happen to London," Weekes said. "Wouldn't any city in the world want to have the Olympic Games?" Weekes said he had applied for $14,000 worth of Olympic tickets. The controversial ticket lottery gave him $1,600 in seats for swimming, basketball and the men's soccer final.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Tribune Newspapers | July 9, 2009
WASHINGTON - -In the face of mounting Republican opposition to its health-care agenda, the Obama administration received a boost Wednesday, winning a preliminary agreement with leading hospital groups to cut federal payments to the industry over the next decade. Under the plan, negotiated primarily by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, hospitals would accept $155 billion in cuts if the administration and its congressional allies succeeded in extending health insurance to tens of millions of people who are now without coverage.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
Maryland officials have barred Alan B. Fabian, an entrepreneur and one-time Republican fundraiser now in federal prison, from doing business with the state for an indefinite period. Fabian, who lived in Cockeysville, pleaded guilty last year to mail and tax fraud in connection with a $32 million fraud. The Board of Public Works, a three-member panel with purview over state contracts, approved the action Wednesday without discussion. Fabian had been notified of the proceeding and did not request a hearing, according to board records.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Laura Smitherman and Tricia Bishop and Laura Smitherman,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
A spokesman for Michael S. Steele defended the new Republican National Committee chairman yesterday against claims by a convicted felon that Steele misused campaign funds from his 2006 Senate bid. Curt Anderson, a political consultant and Steele spokesman, said the allegations had been "fabricated" by Steele's former campaign finance chairman, who was seeking a more lenient sentence in an unrelated criminal case. The Washington Post outlined the accusations in yesterday's editions, including a claim that Steele's campaign paid money to a company owned by his sister for services never performed, and the improper use of tens of thousands more in campaign money.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
After suffering double-digit drubbings in the last two elections that left House and Senate Republicans in the minority and Democrat Barack Obama in the White House, the GOP is desperate for new leadership and fresh ideas. The election last week of former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele as the first African-American chairman of the Republican National Committee signaled party loyalists' desire for a different tone and direction. But unless Mr. Steele, a frequent political commentator on television talk shows, can persuade Republican lawmakers in Congress to break with the disastrous policies of former president George W. Bush, it's hard to see how he alone can rebuild the party's ranks and help win back the power Republicans recently wielded in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | April 9, 2008
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats, opposed to the Senate's focus on helping homebuilders, moved yesterday to reshape housing legislation to help more homeowners. "We need to provide relief to the buyers and families themselves, not just the banks and builders," Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a New York Democrat, said in a statement. House Democrats intend to put "families first," he said. Today, Rangel's Ways and Means Committee will vote on his legislation to provide tax breaks to homeowners, first-time homebuyers and developers of low-income housing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a sign of growing partisan division over domestic eavesdropping, the Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee defended yesterday the Bush administration's limited briefings for Congress on the secret program and accused the committee's top Democrat of changing her position on the issue. Also yesterday, 27 House Democrats sent a letter to President Bush asking for information about the National Security Agency program, including whether communications from or to members of Congress and journalists were intercepted.
NEWS
March 18, 2001
Terry R. Gilleland of Linthicum, a former student member of Anne Arundel County Board of Education, has been appointed to fill a District 32 vacancy on the county's Republican State Central Committee. Gilleland replaces Michael W. Burns, a former delegate and state party official who resigned from the committee effective March 1. The committee chairman, Robert A. Costa, said Burns noted personal and professional considerations in a letter of resignation. The new member is an account manager for Prometric Inc., a computer-based testing company, and expects to receive a master's degree in business administration from the University of Baltimore in May. He served as student member of the school board in the 1994-1995 school year and, among his political activities, ran as a candidate for the party's state central committee in 1998.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | March 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The "substantial" downturn in home sales has slowed the U.S. economy and "is likely to remain a drag on economic growth for a time," Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke told Congress yesterday. Still, Bernanke sees no recession on the horizon. The economy should "continue to expand at a moderate pace," he said, and price inflation may ease even as wages rise. "The weakness in housing and in some parts of manufacturing does not appear to have spilled over to any significant extent to other sectors," Bernanke told the Joint Economic Committee, made up of Senate and House members.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | January 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Finance Committee voted yesterday to rein in the tax breaks that sweeten the huge compensation packages corporations often bestow upon executives. The crackdown was tucked into legislation to raise the federal minimum wage by $2.10 over two years to $7.25. In a unanimous voice vote, the committee approved the wage increase, along with a package of tax reductions and credits aimed at helping small businesses. In a surprise to many lobbyists who didn't see it coming, one provision was aimed at top executives of hundreds of large companies.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.