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SPORTS
November 13, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 8.Total games missed: 77.Earliest estimated date that season can start: Dec. 15.Negotiations: Nothing scheduled. Commissioner David Stern and union director Billy Hunter were supposed to speak by phone yesterday.Projected player salary losses (through Dec. 15): $250 million.Today's best canceled game: Lakers at Boston. Sure, Magic Johnson and Larry Bird are long-since retired, but it's always special when these teams meet.Pub Date: 11/13/98
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
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SPORTS
October 6, 1994
Commissioner David Stern yesterday squashed talk of an NBA lockout by promising that the season would start as scheduled Nov. 4. Stern said the league was willing to negotiate any system designed to fairly divide revenues with its players.Meanwhile, the league approved several rules changes, including the proposal to move the three-point line in to a uniform 22 feet and to prohibit hand-checking from the end line in the backcourt to the opposite foul line.Articles, 7C
SPORTS
October 11, 2010
3rd and long in NFL Bill Kline The Morning Call The NBA and its players have issues, but don't expect a work stoppage. Commissioner David Stern has the magic touch. But as sure as another sack of Jay Cutler, you can bet there will be no NFL next September. Owners want an 18-game schedule and a bigger cut of the revenue. Also out there like an uncovered wide receiver is the idea of a rookie wage scale. The players not only won't accept a pay cut, they'll want even more money if the league goes to 18 games.
SPORTS
December 13, 2005
"Basically, I just changed myself. Every thought I had, every step I took, was positive." Michael Campbell New Zealand golfer, on his change in attitude that led to a U.S. Open victory in 2005 "Was it his pipe? Who knows? We know for sure it was his career. Judge that. Just that." Ethan Skolnick South Florida Sun-Sentinel, arguing that Michael Irvin's recent arrest for having drug paraphernalia - like the rest of his off-field behavior - shouldn't be considered in deciding on his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame "For sure, Stern's next gig will be as a judge on America's Next Top Model, because he is seemingly more concerned about NBA players' wardrobes than the state of the actual game."
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
HOUSTON -- Calling a potential work stoppage in the NBA "very dangerous, and something we very much want to avoid," commissioner David Stern said last night that talks between the players' association and team owners will result in a new collective bargaining agreement, possibly as soon as next week.There have been reports that the owners would lock out the players after the end of the season, with a rookie salary cap and increased merchandising revenue for players key issues. But Stern said that around-the-clock negotiations over the past three days make such a scenario improbable.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2003
SAN ANTONIO - Michael Jordan could be back in the NBA as early as next season in an executive or ownership role, league commissioner David Stern said last night. In addressing the media before Game 2 of the NBA Finals, Stern said he had a "strong sense" that Jordan, who was fired by Washington Wizards owner Abe Pollin as president of basketball operations last month, would be "back in our league by the 2003-2004 season." Stern declined to elaborate on the role in which he envisioned Jordan would return, as well as which team he would join.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 7, 1999
So, the NBA is back and commissioner David Stern has saved the house of professional basketball. But did he and the players burn the village in the process, and will the new product be worth watching once things get up and running?That's the multimillion-dollar question left from the end of the lockout yesterday. The NBA, as much as any sports organization, has come to depend on television to mold its image. A prolonged period of games with out-of-shape, poorly conditioned players will hurt the NBA's television image, assuming, of course, that viewers even want to watch.
SPORTS
By MIKE CRANSTON | AP Sports Writer | February 27, 2010
NBA commissioner David Stern expects Michael Jordan to be approved as majority owner of the Charlotte Bobcats by the end of next month. Stern released a statement Saturday saying he was "pleased" the former NBA superstar had reached a deal to buy the money-losing team from Bob Johnson. Stern anticipates an expedited approval process by the league's owners. Jordan has declined to comment after striking a deal late Friday. Jordan has been a part-owner of the Bobcats with the final say on basketball decisions.
NEWS
By Ken Berger and Robert Kessler and Ken Berger and Robert Kessler,Newsday | July 21, 2007
NEW YORK -- The specter of point shaving rocked the NBA yesterday with revelations that the FBI is investigating referee Tim Donaghy for allegedly betting on games, perhaps including those he officiated. Donaghy, 40, a 13-year veteran of the league, recently resigned amid the probe and is expected to be arrested as early as next week along with associates identified as sports gamblers from southern New Jersey, several law enforcement sources told Newsday. Donaghy's associates were said to have been affiliated with organized crime, identified by sources as "a bunch of South Jersey gamblers."
SPORTS
By SHIRA SPRINGER and SHIRA SPRINGER,THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 21, 2007
In the days preceding the 1985 NBA draft lottery, commissioner David Stern practiced drawing oversized envelopes from a clear, spherical drum. Staff members carted the drum into his office, where Stern remembered "rehearsing to a fault," hoping all would go smoothly for the live lottery broadcast from the Waldorf-Astoria in New York. For the young commissioner with 16 months on the job, the actual event - 6 minutes, 31 seconds - passed in a blur, but the final moments and ultimate outcome remain unforgettable.
SPORTS
December 13, 2005
"Basically, I just changed myself. Every thought I had, every step I took, was positive." Michael Campbell New Zealand golfer, on his change in attitude that led to a U.S. Open victory in 2005 "Was it his pipe? Who knows? We know for sure it was his career. Judge that. Just that." Ethan Skolnick South Florida Sun-Sentinel, arguing that Michael Irvin's recent arrest for having drug paraphernalia - like the rest of his off-field behavior - shouldn't be considered in deciding on his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame "For sure, Stern's next gig will be as a judge on America's Next Top Model, because he is seemingly more concerned about NBA players' wardrobes than the state of the actual game."
SPORTS
By David Steele | June 22, 2005
SAN ANTONIO -- Someday, probably when their favorite players can or can't be re-signed, NBA fans will care deeply about the economic details agreed to and announced yesterday by the league and the players union. Today, though, the issue everybody's tuned in to is the age minimum. It was never a deal-breaker when commissioner David Stern and union chief Billy Hunter were playing chicken as a July 1 lockout date approached. But as far as the public, NBA fan or not, was concerned, this just-concluded labor fight was one big referendum on how old a player ought to be before he can become a millionaire on the basketball court.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - NBA commissioner David Stern said yesterday he doesn't understand why players union director Billy Hunter inserted the element of race into increasingly volatile collective bargaining negotiations, calling Hunter's statements "below him," "I don't know what he's talking about," Stern said after testifying on the league's steroid testing policy on Capitol Hill. "I've worked with him for years and I think those kinds of statements by him are below him. I think he's a solid leader, someone I know."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2003
SAN ANTONIO - Michael Jordan could be back in the NBA as early as next season in an executive or ownership role, league commissioner David Stern said last night. In addressing the media before Game 2 of the NBA Finals, Stern said he had a "strong sense" that Jordan, who was fired by Washington Wizards owner Abe Pollin as president of basketball operations last month, would be "back in our league by the 2003-2004 season." Stern declined to elaborate on the role in which he envisioned Jordan would return, as well as which team he would join.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
LOS ANGELES - NBA commissioner David Stern yesterday expressed mild amusement with the wide variety of conspiracy theories that float among the public and some players and coaches regarding the league's desire to see certain matchups. At the same time, while briefing a gathering of media before last night's Game 1 of the NBA Finals, Stern also indicated that he would take swift and punitive action against players and coaches that publicly question the NBA's integrity. "The notion that you can impugn the integrity of the league by alleging what is criminal conduct is false," Stern said.
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