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NEWS
May 16, 1993
The Maryland Bar Association's Committee on Gender Equality meets this week to report on its review of "the Bollinger affair." We assume it will ask the Commission on Judicial Disabilities to investigate Baltimore County Circuit Court Judge Thomas J. Bollinger. He recently gave a man convicted of second-degree rape probation before verdict. He accompanied this extraordinarily light sentence for such a crime with remarks that also raise questions about his judicial temperament.The Commission on Judicial Disabilities is required by law to investigate complaints it does not deem "frivolous."
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
In a rare public hearing yesterday, Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance defended himself against allegations of misconduct and asked a state judicial disciplinary panel to dismiss the matter or send it to an appeals court. His lawyers, Jose F. Anderson and Alvin I. Frederick, argued before the Commission on Judicial Disabilities about accusations that the judge massaged a young prosecutor's shoulder and criticized the way a prospective juror wore his yarmulke in court last year. The 11-member commission is expected to make a decision on whether to go forward with the case by the next hearing Oct. 21. If that hearing goes forward, members will then decide whether to sanction Nance.
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NEWS
February 25, 1995
At last Maryland has a debate on judicial accountability.Some state judges are grumbling at what appears to them unseemly haste, but plenty of citizens are delighted to watch the courts and the legislature competing to enact reforms first.Too many people have spent too many years waiting for signs of life from a toothless Commission on Judicial Disabilities. With virtually no staff or budget, there has been no public response to complaints and, thus, no way to refute critics who claim that the panel is simply not up to the task of imposing discipline on wayward judges.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2004
Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance, reprimanded three years ago for inappropriate conduct, has been accused again by a state judicial disciplinary panel and faces a rare public hearing next month in connection with the charges. According to documents reviewed yesterday by The Sun, Nance is alleged to have made an "unwelcome" gesture to a city prosecutor by massaging her shoulder and is also charged with criticizing the way a prospective juror was wearing his yarmulke in court last year.
NEWS
July 30, 1993
Judge Thomas J. Bollinger, some of his colleagues on the Circuit Court of Baltimore County and the Maryland Bar Association's Select Committee on Gender Equality all look a little silly in the latest episode linked to his highly publicized behavior in a rape case last spring.Judge Bollinger was roundly criticized then for his sentencing and his sentencing remarks. He sentenced the convicted man to a much less severe punishment than the state's guidelines' suggested as the minimum. He seemed to equate rape in this case with a minor property crime.
NEWS
April 6, 1996
MONTGOMERY COUNTY District Court Judge Henry J. Monahan will have a chance to defend himself against allegations that he conducted lunch-hour liaisons with a prostitute in his judicial chambers. In a unanimous recommendation, the Commission on Judicial Disabilities has urged his removal from the bench, but no action will be taken prior to a hearing by the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.That is how it should be. However grievous the charges against a judge, he or she, like any citizen, deserves a say in court.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
In a rare public hearing yesterday, Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance defended himself against allegations of misconduct and asked a state judicial disciplinary panel to dismiss the matter or send it to an appeals court. His lawyers, Jose F. Anderson and Alvin I. Frederick, argued before the Commission on Judicial Disabilities about accusations that the judge massaged a young prosecutor's shoulder and criticized the way a prospective juror wore his yarmulke in court last year. The 11-member commission is expected to make a decision on whether to go forward with the case by the next hearing Oct. 21. If that hearing goes forward, members will then decide whether to sanction Nance.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
Maryland's judicial disciplinary panel has reprimanded Baltimore County Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger for comments that appeared "insensitive to women's rights" in his sentencing of a rapist in April 1993.Because the panel found no official misconduct in the sentencing, Judge Bollinger issued a statement saying that he had been exonerated. But advocates for women's rights said the unusual reprimand should be a warning to other judges about sensitivity to women's issues.The issue arose last year when Judge Bollinger gave Lawrence A. Gillette, a 44-year-old theater manager, probation before judgment for raping an 18-year-old employee who had passed out in his bed.The judge called the situation "the dream of a lot of males" and in comments at the sentencing and afterward, criticized Maryland law for making sex with an intoxicated person second-degree rape.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
The Parkton trucker who shot his unfaithful wife has been released from the Baltimore County jail, a year after his sentencing by Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. caused a national uproar.Kenneth Lee Peacock, 37, was freed Saturday morning after earning credits on work release that reduced his 18-month sentence for manslaughter, said James M. Dean, administrator of the Baltimore County Bureau of Corrections.Mr. Peacock caused no problems and worked steadily, Mr. Dean said. "Obviously, he did well enough to get out of here."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
A prominent Prince George's County circuit judge who had sexual contact with an undercover policeman in an Annapolis Mall bathroom was reprimanded yesterday by a state commission but will face no other sanctions.Judge Larnzell Martin Jr. could have lost his job over the charges against him.He was charged in January with indecent exposure, a fourth-degree sexual offense and second-degree assault after the encounter with the officer. The legal charges were put on a "stet" docket for one year -- meaning that if he has no other legal troubles, the charges will be dropped.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
A prominent Prince George's County circuit judge who had sexual contact with an undercover policeman in an Annapolis Mall bathroom was reprimanded yesterday by a state commission but will face no other sanctions.Judge Larnzell Martin Jr. could have lost his job over the charges against him.He was charged in January with indecent exposure, a fourth-degree sexual offense and second-degree assault after the encounter with the officer. The legal charges were put on a "stet" docket for one year -- meaning that if he has no other legal troubles, the charges will be dropped.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
An Anne Arundel County circuit judge who barred visits between a divorced father and his children in the company of his gay lover or "anyone having homosexual tendencies" has been issued a confidential warning by the state's judicial discipline panel.The warning, which the judge revealed, accompanies the dismissal of a complaint brought by two Baltimore women on behalf of the Lesbian Avengers, a gay rights group. They alleged to the Commission on Judicial Disabilities that Judge Lawrence H. Rushworth showed bias against homosexuals when he forbade Robert Boswell, whose former wife had custody of their elementary-school-age children, to keep the youngsters overnight or visit them in the presence of his lover or anyone else who is gay.No similar restrictions were placed on his former wife, Kimberly Boswell of Glen Burnie, in the April 1996 order.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
The city's nominating commission for Circuit Court judges yesterday recommended Baltimore Judge Kenneth Lavon Johnson for reappointment to the bench, despite a series of allegations that the 60-year-old judge had a record of intemperate behavior in court.Johnson, a controversial judge who won his seat by out polling appointed incumbents in 1982, has been under fire for his actions in a number of cases, four of which also are being investigated by the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | September 25, 1996
IT IS SAID THAT the road to hell is paved with good intentions. So it is that Maryland feminists, together with an eager governor and a pusillanimous legislature, incensed by ''insensitive'' comments by two Baltimore County judges in sentencing proceedings, have placed on the November ballot a proposal to enlarge the state's Commission on Judicial Disabilities.That would subject the commission to control by the state's governor -- an invasion of judicial independence virtually unparalleled in the common-law world.
NEWS
April 6, 1996
MONTGOMERY COUNTY District Court Judge Henry J. Monahan will have a chance to defend himself against allegations that he conducted lunch-hour liaisons with a prostitute in his judicial chambers. In a unanimous recommendation, the Commission on Judicial Disabilities has urged his removal from the bench, but no action will be taken prior to a hearing by the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.That is how it should be. However grievous the charges against a judge, he or she, like any citizen, deserves a say in court.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
The Parkton trucker who shot his unfaithful wife has been released from the Baltimore County jail, a year after his sentencing by Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. caused a national uproar.Kenneth Lee Peacock, 37, was freed Saturday morning after earning credits on work release that reduced his 18-month sentence for manslaughter, said James M. Dean, administrator of the Baltimore County Bureau of Corrections.Mr. Peacock caused no problems and worked steadily, Mr. Dean said. "Obviously, he did well enough to get out of here."
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | September 25, 1996
IT IS SAID THAT the road to hell is paved with good intentions. So it is that Maryland feminists, together with an eager governor and a pusillanimous legislature, incensed by ''insensitive'' comments by two Baltimore County judges in sentencing proceedings, have placed on the November ballot a proposal to enlarge the state's Commission on Judicial Disabilities.That would subject the commission to control by the state's governor -- an invasion of judicial independence virtually unparalleled in the common-law world.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
A Baltimore County judge faces an unprecedented public hearing on charges of improper conduct for his comments in sentencing a trucker to 18 months on work release for killing an unfaithful wife.The recently revamped Commission on Judicial Disabilities has scheduled an Oct. 30 hearing for Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr., with the charges to be prosecuted by its new investigative counsel.The sentence and Judge Cahill's remarks prompted an uproar that focused attention on the little-known commission on judicial conduct, including criticism for its secrecy and lack of action.
NEWS
February 25, 1995
At last Maryland has a debate on judicial accountability.Some state judges are grumbling at what appears to them unseemly haste, but plenty of citizens are delighted to watch the courts and the legislature competing to enact reforms first.Too many people have spent too many years waiting for signs of life from a toothless Commission on Judicial Disabilities. With virtually no staff or budget, there has been no public response to complaints and, thus, no way to refute critics who claim that the panel is simply not up to the task of imposing discipline on wayward judges.
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