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By Daniel de Vise, The Washington Post | April 3, 2012
University of Maryland University College was academically sound on the day President Susan Aldridge resigned, according to the chancellor of the state university system. That assurance, conveyed by Chancellor William E. Kirwan in an interview last week, is the closest Maryland higher-education officials have come to answering questions about the sudden departure last month by the leader of the nation's largest online-focused public university. Aldridge's decision to step down has drawn notice across the national higher-education community because neither she nor the university system has offered an explanation.
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NEWS
By Daniel de Vise, The Washington Post | April 3, 2012
University of Maryland University College was academically sound on the day President Susan Aldridge resigned, according to the chancellor of the state university system. That assurance, conveyed by Chancellor William E. Kirwan in an interview last week, is the closest Maryland higher-education officials have come to answering questions about the sudden departure last month by the leader of the nation's largest online-focused public university. Aldridge's decision to step down has drawn notice across the national higher-education community because neither she nor the university system has offered an explanation.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
The commission that awards accreditation to higher education institutions has placed Baltimore City Community College on probation because of concerns about the school's ability to evaluate student learning. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education last month announced that it will review the school's accreditation after questions were raised over the "assessment of student learning" which "demonstrates that, at graduation, or other appropriate points, the institution's students have knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with institutional and appropriate higher education goals," according to the commission's website.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
The commission that awards accreditation to higher education institutions has placed Baltimore City Community College on probation because of concerns about the school's ability to evaluate student learning. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education last month announced that it will review the school's accreditation after questions were raised over the "assessment of student learning" which "demonstrates that, at graduation, or other appropriate points, the institution's students have knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with institutional and appropriate higher education goals," according to the commission's website.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Baltimore International College plans to issue a statement Thursday about the future of the institution because the school is expected to lose its accreditation. According to a statement on the college's Facebook page, the school's "Board of Trustees met to seriously review all options for the College while keeping in mind the welfare of our students, faculty, and staff. " The trustees were expected to weigh whether to appeal the Middle States Commission on Higher Education' decision not to accredit BIC as well as other alternatives.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
The Middle States Commission on Higher Education removed Baltimore City Community College from probation on Friday after the college made progress in assessing student performance. If the college had not made changes, the Middle States Commission could have yanked the school's accreditation. Last July, Middle States said BCCC lacked any comprehensive method for assessing student achievement. The president, Carolane Williams, said in a statement that "the challenges from MSCHE have enabled BCCC to emerge as a stronger institution.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
Virginia's Stratford University has received preliminary approval from the Maryland Higher Education Commission to take over operations of embattled Baltimore International College on Jan. 1. The approval from MHEC was one condition of a legal settlement reached in September that forestalled the culinary college's loss of accreditation. Now, the takeover must be approved by the agency that accredits Stratford and by the banks that hold bonds backing Baltimore International's operations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service T | December 31, 1991
In one of several important desegregation lawsuits in higher education, a federal judge ruled yesterday that Alabama and its state universities must change financing and admission policies and hire more black faculty members and administrators.The district judge, Harold Murphy of Rome, Ga., ruled that vestiges of racial discrimination remained in Alabama's higher education system. He ordered Alabama and its universities to devise plans to remedy those problems, and said he would retain jurisdiction over the case for the next 10 years to insure that the ruling was carried out.Judge Murphy's decision could become moot, however, because the U.S. Supreme Court is considering a similar case in Mississippi, the first time the court will address the question of desegregation in higher education.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
I feel bad for Sojourner-Douglass College students who may see the value of their diplomas go up in smoke ( "With Sojourner-Douglass' accreditation in jeopardy, students in limbo," March 30). Until I became involved with Baltimore International College's similar accreditation problems, I had no idea of the power the Middle States Commission on Higher Education enjoys. More than two years ago the culinary arts and hospitality management school was about to lose its accreditation as well, and since I lived in the neighborhood, the thought of an enormous, empty building was alarming.
FEATURES
September 23, 1990
Dale M. Satake, a community development executive for the Rouse Co., was recently elected president of United Way Community Services. Others honored for their work with United Way were: Jerome W. Geckle, who received the Irving Blum Award; Charles E. Peck, who received a Second Century Initiative Award; Robert Keller, who received the Everyday Hero Award; and Frank C. Bisesi, who received the Phillip H. Van Gelder Award.*Edna and Roland Walters Sr. celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary yesterday.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Reginald S. Avery, who was inaugurated yesterday as the fifth president of Coppin State University, pledged to work with the faculty and students to strengthen the university's academics and deepen its ties with its West Baltimore community. "If we say we're an urban institution, if we say we're about community engagement, it needs to be reflected in everything that we do," said Avery, 62. "Coppin State University has a moment in time to make a tremendous difference in the lives of thousands of people," he said.
NEWS
March 21, 2010
Graduate programs Tai Sophia Institute will offer free workshops for caregivers and HR professionals from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday and 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday at the institute. The workshops, funded by the Columbia Foundation Grant, assist in handling job-related stress for Howard County front-line caregivers and human resource staff of agencies such as nursing homes, hospice care, mental health programs, crisis intervention, domestic violence centers, those working with developmentally disabled citizens and other similar agencies, as well as nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and physicians.
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