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NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Greater Annapolis Chamber of Commerce recently released a statement detailing its position on the Year 2020 Panel and the efforts of Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Commission on Growth toaddress growth management.Although the Chamber praised the governor's and commission's efforts, it suggested that consideration of specific growth management legislation should be deferred to allow for additional consideration of regional issues.The chamber's release stated that such issues should be addressedwith the involvement of government officials and planners, and that more flexibility should be given to local jurisdictions to address the objectives of the commission.
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NEWS
June 11, 1991
Phase Two of the battle over statewide growth controls begins this summer when legislative committees, at the request of their presiding officers, begin a two-year study of land-use methods to safeguard the environment surrounding the Chesapeake Bay.Let's hope the second phase goes more smoothly than the first. While the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region -- better known as the 2020 commission -- made a strong case for reining-in rampant growth over the next 30 years, its recommendations proved too much for the General Assembly.
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NEWS
December 12, 1990
The ink is barely dry on the draft report from the governor's commission on growth, and already what should have been a debate over growth management has turned into a turf war, with Harford County Executive Eileen Rehrmann and Howard County Executive Chuck Ecker charging the state with trying to take away local control of land-use planning. Maybe so, but we ask, what's wrong with that?Development is no more an isolated county problem than air or water pollution or transportation -- none of which stops at geographical boundaries.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Greater Annapolis Chamber of Commerce recently released a statement detailing its position on the Year 2020 Panel and the efforts of Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Commission on Growth toaddress growth management.Although the Chamber praised the governor's and commission's efforts, it suggested that consideration of specific growth management legislation should be deferred to allow for additional consideration of regional issues.The chamber's release stated that such issues should be addressedwith the involvement of government officials and planners, and that more flexibility should be given to local jurisdictions to address the objectives of the commission.
NEWS
December 17, 1990
Anne Arundel County could lose as many as 44,866 acres of farm and forest lands during the next 30 years under existing land-use practices, state planners say.Their estimates show 89,290 of the county's 269,000 acres are already developed.Unless the state and county change their policies for controlling growth, an additional 23,159 acres of farmland and 21,707 acres of forest will be developed by 2020, said Ronald M. Kreitner, director of the Maryland Office of Planning.Proposals by the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region will be discussed at a workshop at 7 tonight in the Glen Burnie Improvement Association meeting hall on Crain Highway.
NEWS
December 7, 1990
Without tighter management of growth in Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay will continue to lose its health and productivity. The Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region targets the problem and recommends laws that could limit future damage to the bay. It is a blueprint for more efficient planning of development and the use of land.Without it, restrictions such as the Critical Areas Law will fail to provide sufficient protection to revitalize the bay and its watershed. Poisonous fumes from millions of cars that criss-cross the Chesapeake region will grow.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
Sweeping proposals advanced by the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region would accomplish far more than restore the bay to good health.For the first time, residential and commercial building throughout Maryland would proceed in a cohesive, orderly fashion under state guidelines. New growth would be restricted to designated areas in each of the state's 23 counties, while swathes of environmentally sensitive acreage and farmland would be preserved.This report calls for fundamental changes in the region's way of life.
NEWS
January 7, 1991
Give Gov. William Donald Schaefer credit for urging his Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region to finish its job soon. His administration does not want to lose momentum on one of its most important pieces of legislation for the upcoming General Assembly session: a plan to set uniform growth guidelines throughout Maryland.The state has paid a heavy price for local scatter-shot planning and poor land use. Counties have liberally issued permits to homebuilders to boost their own local economies.
NEWS
June 11, 1991
Phase Two of the battle over statewide growth controls begins this summer when legislative committees, at the request of their presiding officers, begin a two-year study of land-use methods to safeguard the environment surrounding the Chesapeake Bay.Let's hope the second phase goes more smoothly than the first. While the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region -- better known as the 2020 commission -- made a strong case for reining-in rampant growth over the next 30 years, its recommendations proved too much for the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
The ink is barely dry on the draft of a sweeping plan to protect Chesapeake Bay from suburban sprawl, and already some members of a gubernatorial commission are jockeying to change it.Environmentalists hailed the state growth-management legislation proposed yesterday to the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region. But, some on the 33-member panel indicated last night they still are not satisfied with the measure, despite the compromises worked out between development and conservation interests.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | March 17, 1991
that's the name of a TV show. Right.2020 -- that's good eyesight. Right.2020 -- that's a vision for the future. Huh?Yes. Maryland 2020, the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region presents a vision for the future, one remarkably similar to the one adopted and refined by Carroll County planners the past 20 years.The 2020 commission's report, "Protecting the Future -- A Vision for Maryland," offers five recommendations, the first of which mirrors the growth-management plan already in place in Carroll, and the rest of which are consistent with that plan.
NEWS
February 16, 1991
Gender ControlEditor: You ran a story about the flight controller involved in the recent plane crash in Los Angeles, with the headline, ''Female flight controller's worst nightmare came true in L.A. plane collision.''It's interesting that you felt the need to indicate her gender. Funny, but I don't recall ever reading headlines such as ''Male pilot error causes plane crash'' or ''Male air controller error causes death of 300.''Carol Calvert.Baltimore.Growth BillEditor: As if there wasn't enough misinformation for the public to weed through, The Sun chose to publish John W. Taylor's letter Feb. 6 on the growth management bill pending in theGeneral Assembly.
NEWS
January 7, 1991
Give Gov. William Donald Schaefer credit for urging his Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region to finish its job soon. His administration does not want to lose momentum on one of its most important pieces of legislation for the upcoming General Assembly session: a plan to set uniform growth guidelines throughout Maryland.The state has paid a heavy price for local scatter-shot planning and poor land use. Counties have liberally issued permits to homebuilders to boost their own local economies.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | December 19, 1990
If county and municipal planners get there way, the statewide growth bill is in deep trouble.Two major issues appeared to have irked the nearly 150 planners and county officials who met at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore on Monday to review the legislation drafted by the governor's so-called 2020 commission on growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region.The first was that local jurisdictions were not consulted. Many, like Howard County, had recently enacted growth plans of their own and would have liked to have shared those plans with the commission.
NEWS
December 17, 1990
Anne Arundel County could lose as many as 44,866 acres of farm and forest lands during the next 30 years under existing land-use practices, state planners say.Their estimates show 89,290 of the county's 269,000 acres are already developed.Unless the state and county change their policies for controlling growth, an additional 23,159 acres of farmland and 21,707 acres of forest will be developed by 2020, said Ronald M. Kreitner, director of the Maryland Office of Planning.Proposals by the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region will be discussed at a workshop at 7 tonight in the Glen Burnie Improvement Association meeting hall on Crain Highway.
NEWS
December 12, 1990
The ink is barely dry on the draft report from the governor's commission on growth, and already what should have been a debate over growth management has turned into a turf war, with Harford County Executive Eileen Rehrmann and Howard County Executive Chuck Ecker charging the state with trying to take away local control of land-use planning. Maybe so, but we ask, what's wrong with that?Development is no more an isolated county problem than air or water pollution or transportation -- none of which stops at geographical boundaries.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | March 17, 1991
that's the name of a TV show. Right.2020 -- that's good eyesight. Right.2020 -- that's a vision for the future. Huh?Yes. Maryland 2020, the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region presents a vision for the future, one remarkably similar to the one adopted and refined by Carroll County planners the past 20 years.The 2020 commission's report, "Protecting the Future -- A Vision for Maryland," offers five recommendations, the first of which mirrors the growth-management plan already in place in Carroll, and the rest of which are consistent with that plan.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | December 19, 1990
If county and municipal planners get there way, the statewide growth bill is in deep trouble.Two major issues appeared to have irked the nearly 150 planners and county officials who met at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore on Monday to review the legislation drafted by the governor's so-called 2020 commission on growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region.The first was that local jurisdictions were not consulted. Many, like Howard County, had recently enacted growth plans of their own and would have liked to have shared those plans with the commission.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
Sweeping proposals advanced by the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region would accomplish far more than restore the bay to good health.For the first time, residential and commercial building throughout Maryland would proceed in a cohesive, orderly fashion under state guidelines. New growth would be restricted to designated areas in each of the state's 23 counties, while swathes of environmentally sensitive acreage and farmland would be preserved.This report calls for fundamental changes in the region's way of life.
NEWS
December 7, 1990
Without tighter management of growth in Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay will continue to lose its health and productivity. The Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region targets the problem and recommends laws that could limit future damage to the bay. It is a blueprint for more efficient planning of development and the use of land.Without it, restrictions such as the Critical Areas Law will fail to provide sufficient protection to revitalize the bay and its watershed. Poisonous fumes from millions of cars that criss-cross the Chesapeake region will grow.
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