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NEWS
By Penny Bender and Penny Bender,States News Service | December 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Centers for Disease Control should allow more people to comment on its controversial proposal to broaden the AIDS definition, a plan that could expand the AIDS population by at least 50 percent, said members of the National Commission on AIDS.Near the end of a two-day conference on the CDC's proposal yesterday, the commission agreed unanimously to ask the CDC to extend the comment period on the new AIDS definition, which ends on Monday.The recommendation followed hours of testimony from experts who said minorities, poor women and intravenous drug users would be left out by the new AIDS criteria and that those who are shifted from a definition of HIV-infected to AIDS patient would burden an already stressed health care system.
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NEWS
August 8, 1993
* Martin S. Ackerman,Martin S. Ackerman, 61, who became chairman and chief executive of Standard Brands Paint Co. six weeks ago after leading its bankruptcy reorganization, died Monday after complications from intestinal surgery in New York.* Robert C. Cosgrove,Robert C. Cosgrove, 74, former chairman of the Green Giant Co., died Aug. 1 after a long illness at his home in Naples, Fla.* Stephen Endean,Stephen Endean, 44, a former executive director of the Gay Rights National Lobby and founder of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, died of AIDS Wednesday at his home in Washington.
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NEWS
June 28, 1993
Wesdon Bishop, 60, a producer and screenwriter, died Friday of a liver ailment in Nashville. He produced about 30 films, including "The Thing With Two Heads" and "Race With the Devil." He was nominated for an Academy Award for the 1970 film "Chrome and Hot Leather."Brian C. Campbell, 43, a painter and jewelry designer whose ex-wife was appointed last year to the National Commission on AIDS, died of AIDS complications June 20 in Provincetown, Mass. He was formerly married to Mary D. Fisher, who learned she had the virus that causes AIDS after he tested positive.
NEWS
June 28, 1993
Wesdon Bishop, 60, a producer and screenwriter, died Friday of a liver ailment in Nashville. He produced about 30 films, including "The Thing With Two Heads" and "Race With the Devil." He was nominated for an Academy Award for the 1970 film "Chrome and Hot Leather."Brian C. Campbell, 43, a painter and jewelry designer whose ex-wife was appointed last year to the National Commission on AIDS, died of AIDS complications June 20 in Provincetown, Mass. He was formerly married to Mary D. Fisher, who learned she had the virus that causes AIDS after he tested positive.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 18, 1993
Magic Johnson says he wants to return to the National Commission on AIDS, but he has not been asked by anyone in the Clinton administration.In a telephone interview, Mr. Johnson said yesterday that he had not contacted President Clinton, because the president has "more than enough to handle right now . . . the budget and taxes, all the other things are, I'm sure, top priority, so whenever he's ready, I'm ready."Mr. Johnson quit the commission in September because of what he claimed was a lack of backing for AIDS programs by the Bush administration.
NEWS
By The (Nashville) Tennessean | August 16, 1991
THE NATIONAL Commission on AIDS has endorsed needle exchange programs among intravenous drug users in an effort to reduce the spread of the disease. It is a logical, common sense approach to the problem. The Bush administration, however, wants nothing to do with such programs. It thinks needle exchanges will only increase drug use by American citizens.One of the criticisms raised by the administration is that there is no scientific evidence showing that needle exchanges reduce risk-taking behavior.
NEWS
By Seattle Times | January 13, 1992
SEATTLE -- Warning that thousands more people could end up homeless and dying on the streets, Dr. June Osborn, chairwoman of the National Commission on AIDS, said the campaign against acquired immune deficiency syndrome must be stepped up immediately."
NEWS
August 8, 1993
* Martin S. Ackerman,Martin S. Ackerman, 61, who became chairman and chief executive of Standard Brands Paint Co. six weeks ago after leading its bankruptcy reorganization, died Monday after complications from intestinal surgery in New York.* Robert C. Cosgrove,Robert C. Cosgrove, 74, former chairman of the Green Giant Co., died Aug. 1 after a long illness at his home in Naples, Fla.* Stephen Endean,Stephen Endean, 44, a former executive director of the Gay Rights National Lobby and founder of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, died of AIDS Wednesday at his home in Washington.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mary Fisher, the AIDS-infected woman from Florida who spoke so movingly at the Republican National Convention in August, is taking Earvin "Magic" Johnson's seat on the National Commission on AIDS, sources confirmed yesterday.The White House is expected to announce the appointment today. Ms. Fisher will be the only member of the advisory panel with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Mr. Johnson, a basketball star who has the virus that is linked to AIDS, resigned from the commission last month and criticized President Bush for not following its recommendations.
NEWS
October 19, 1992
Earvin "Magic" Johnson says he belongs on the basketball court and no one who has watched his wizardry would dispute him. His return to the Los Angeles Lakers, announced last month, will restore some luster that was missing from professional basketball last season. It will also help to remove the stigma that HIV infection often creates.There are still many people who regard the virus that causes AIDS as the modern-day equivalent of that ancient scourge of leprosy. But the sight of Magic Johnson's irrepressible smile, his abundant enthusiasm and his dazzling skills will be vivid reminders that behind the statistics we often read on HIV and AIDS are not faceless lepers but real people with lives that aren't over yet.Few sports are as grueling as professional basketball.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 18, 1993
Magic Johnson says he wants to return to the National Commission on AIDS, but he has not been asked by anyone in the Clinton administration.In a telephone interview, Mr. Johnson said yesterday that he had not contacted President Clinton, because the president has "more than enough to handle right now . . . the budget and taxes, all the other things are, I'm sure, top priority, so whenever he's ready, I'm ready."Mr. Johnson quit the commission in September because of what he claimed was a lack of backing for AIDS programs by the Bush administration.
NEWS
October 19, 1992
Earvin "Magic" Johnson says he belongs on the basketball court and no one who has watched his wizardry would dispute him. His return to the Los Angeles Lakers, announced last month, will restore some luster that was missing from professional basketball last season. It will also help to remove the stigma that HIV infection often creates.There are still many people who regard the virus that causes AIDS as the modern-day equivalent of that ancient scourge of leprosy. But the sight of Magic Johnson's irrepressible smile, his abundant enthusiasm and his dazzling skills will be vivid reminders that behind the statistics we often read on HIV and AIDS are not faceless lepers but real people with lives that aren't over yet.Few sports are as grueling as professional basketball.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mary Fisher, the AIDS-infected woman from Florida who spoke so movingly at the Republican National Convention in August, is taking Earvin "Magic" Johnson's seat on the National Commission on AIDS, sources confirmed yesterday.The White House is expected to announce the appointment today. Ms. Fisher will be the only member of the advisory panel with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Mr. Johnson, a basketball star who has the virus that is linked to AIDS, resigned from the commission last month and criticized President Bush for not following its recommendations.
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
In confronting the nation's AIDS epidemic, President Bush has tried to follow the path of least political resistance -- retreating from policies that seem likely to provoke a hostile response. But this cautious road has proved bumpy, earning him scorn rather than praise from some conservatives, medical specialists and AIDS activists.On one hand, many AIDS groups are frustrated by the White House's refusal to promote safe sex and the use of condoms, authorize the distribution of clean needles to drug addicts and repeal a ban on immigration by AIDS victims.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- There is no medical or scientific justification for restricting the practice of AIDS-infected health care professionals, nor should they be forced to tell their patients that they carry the virus, the National Commission on AIDS said yesterday.The commission also opposed mandatory AIDS testing of health workers, urging instead that any such testing be voluntary.The best way to prevent transmission of the virus by health care workers was through strict adherence to normal infection control procedures, the commission said, adding that "no effort should be spared" to ensure that all health care professionals are trained in and apply so-called universal precautions.
NEWS
By Philip J. Hilts and Philip J. Hilts,New York Times News Service | June 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The bipartisan National Commission on AIDS said yesterday that the Bush administration had failed the nation by its poor leadership in combating the AIDS epidemic.The commission released a statement after what commission members said was an extraordinarily disappointing meeting Wednesday on AIDS and government leadership with Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, secretary of Health and Human Services.The commission, appointed jointly by Congress and the White House and charged with creating a national consensus on what should be done about AIDS, said in its statement, "President Bush and the Department of Health and Human Services have failed to meet fully their responsibilities in leading the national response to the monumental human suffering and economic loss from the HIV/AIDS epidemic."
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
In confronting the nation's AIDS epidemic, President Bush has tried to follow the path of least political resistance -- retreating from policies that seem likely to provoke a hostile response. But this cautious road has proved bumpy, earning him scorn rather than praise from some conservatives, medical specialists and AIDS activists.On one hand, many AIDS groups are frustrated by the White House's refusal to promote safe sex and the use of condoms, authorize the distribution of clean needles to drug addicts and repeal a ban on immigration by AIDS victims.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- There is no medical or scientific justification for restricting the practice of AIDS-infected health care professionals, nor should they be forced to tell their patients that they carry the virus, the National Commission on AIDS said yesterday.The commission also opposed mandatory AIDS testing of health workers, urging instead that any such testing be voluntary.The best way to prevent transmission of the virus by health care workers was through strict adherence to normal infection control procedures, the commission said, adding that "no effort should be spared" to ensure that all health care professionals are trained in and apply so-called universal precautions.
NEWS
By Seattle Times | January 13, 1992
SEATTLE -- Warning that thousands more people could end up homeless and dying on the streets, Dr. June Osborn, chairwoman of the National Commission on AIDS, said the campaign against acquired immune deficiency syndrome must be stepped up immediately."
NEWS
By Penny Bender and Penny Bender,States News Service | December 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Centers for Disease Control should allow more people to comment on its controversial proposal to broaden the AIDS definition, a plan that could expand the AIDS population by at least 50 percent, said members of the National Commission on AIDS.Near the end of a two-day conference on the CDC's proposal yesterday, the commission agreed unanimously to ask the CDC to extend the comment period on the new AIDS definition, which ends on Monday.The recommendation followed hours of testimony from experts who said minorities, poor women and intravenous drug users would be left out by the new AIDS criteria and that those who are shifted from a definition of HIV-infected to AIDS patient would burden an already stressed health care system.
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