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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 19, 2001
Members of the Anne Arundel County Salary Standard Commission have drafted tentative recommendations for council salaries. Chairman Frederick C. Sussman said yesterday commission members agree that salaries for the next council, members of which will take office next year, should receive an increase of $7,500 to $15,000. The commission is expected to report its recommendations to elected officials Nov. 19. The annual salaries for council members and officers range from $28,600 to $33,000.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Robert Lee Lyles Jr., who had two careers in his 69 years and excelled at each, died May 27 at his home in Annapolis. A scientist, physician and state policy adviser, Dr. Lyles "was a modern renaissance man with a tremendous curiosity," said Gene Ransom, CEO of MedChi, the Maryland State Medical Society. In April, Dr. Lyles was honored by the Maryland Society of Anesthesiologists by having a scholarship created in his name, "established to support the efforts of MSA members to promote the specialty of anesthesiology and preserve the appropriateness and safety of the delivery of anesthesia in Maryland.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
A court decision expected to improve the progress of a $10.8 billion merger between Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group and a Florida utility instead has made it more difficult. Yesterday, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that the legislature could not remove members of the Public Service Commission as a law had ordered this summer. But the court did not address a portion of the legislation that prohibits the sitting commission from taking final action on the merger. That means the commissioners can keep their jobs, but they can't rule on the merger, according to lawyers who quickly reviewed the opinion yesterday for The Sun. But what it means for the companies is still unclear.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
When someone complains to the Anne Arundel County Human Relations Commission about housing or employment discrimination, commissioners are powerless to do much about it. That's the impression the commissioners themselves have, and they say it affects how people perceive their ability to help. "Our complaints are probably low because people know that we don't have any enforcement powers," said Yevola Peters, a special assistant to the county executive who serves as the county government's human relations officer.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
The divided planning commission will take its time defining how the county will enforce its adequate public facilities rules -- tackling each issue separately.Planners aren't in a hurry despite added pressure to use these rules to slow the county's development.An ordinance designed to slow subdivision construction over the next 18 months or until the county adopts a new master plan takes effect today.All subdivision plans submitted during the next year and a half are to be rejected unless the builders can show that schools, roads, emergency services and sewer and water capacity can accommodate the development.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
When someone complains to the Anne Arundel County Human Relations Commission about housing or employment discrimination, commissioners are powerless to do much about it. That's the impression the commissioners themselves have, and they say it affects how people perceive their ability to help. "Our complaints are probably low because people know that we don't have any enforcement powers," said Yevola Peters, a special assistant to the county executive who serves as the county government's human relations officer.
NEWS
November 30, 1994
Hampstead Planning and Zoning Commission members Monday night unanimously recommended the Town Council adopt an ordinance restricting developers from recording more than 50 lots in a 12-month period.Carroll County officials, who recently adopted such an ordinance, have asked each municipality to pass similar regulations to help county services keep pace with development.The ordinance halves the number of lots permitted each year, because previous regulations allowed developers to record 25 lots each quarter.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
After a short hearing yesterday, Carroll County Circuit Judge Michael M. Galloway said he will issue a written decision on whether he will let stand a lawsuit accusing the county commissioners of taking malicious action against the previous ethics commission. The lawsuit, filed in December, claims the county commissioners wrongfully fired ethics commission members James F.W. Talley, Suzanne Primoff and John Harner, who died before the lawsuit was filed. The lawsuit states that the firings were part of a conspiracy to thwart an ethics investigation of Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | November 28, 1994
Hampstead's Planning and Zoning Commission members expect to make a recommendation to the Town Council tonight on a proposal for an ordinance to restrict developers to recording 50 lots per year in each development.Carroll County officials, who are in the process of adopting such an ordinance, have asked each municipality to adopt similar regulations to help county services keep pace with development.When a developer records a lot, he informs the county that he would like to build on that lot.In Hampstead, commission members will vote on the recommendation tonight after a public hearing at 7 p.m. at Town Hall on Carroll Street.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
The Planning and Zoning Commission took another swipe yesterday at proposals from county department heads yesterday, cutting $4.98 million from noneducational 1998 capital budget requests.Since Oct. 1, the commission has whittled $9.2 million from the department chiefs' spending requests. And members will begin their line-by-line review of the Board of Education's proposed capital plan Nov. 14.Commission members spent the first part of their 8 1/2 -hour meeting debating whether to limit their review to "rubber stamping" every request that conforms to the county master plan.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
— A proposal that could have slashed Maryland's annual striped bass catch by more than 50 percent in 2012 was shelved Tuesday morning by the commission that oversees East Coast fisheries. The 9-6 vote by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission's striped bass board will most likely postpone any further discussion of a harvest reduction until 2013, when a new population assessment is due. "I think it was appropriate," said Ed O'Brien, an official with the Maryland Charter Boat Association and the National Association of Charterboat Operators.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
Frank F. Favazza Jr., a general contractor who was a member of the Maryland Racing Commission, died of Parkinson's disease complications Wednesday at Lorien Mays Chapel Health Center in Timonium. He was 82. "He was a true American dream," said former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who was a close friend. "He started as a manual laborer and became one of the top general contractors in Maryland. " Born in Baltimore and raised in the Pimlico section of Northwest Baltimore, Mr. Favazza worked alongside his father at a produce store and with his mother at their Boarman Cafe on Reisterstown Road, where the Favazzas were known for their pizzas and other dishes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
Residents of Howard County's oldest public housing complex would face higher rents this fall if county housing officials can persuade skeptical Housing Commission members to go along with their proposal. A vote on the idea for Hilltop Housing in Ellicott City split the four commission members in attendance 2-2 Tuesday night, meaning the proposal failed, but Deputy Housing Director Thomas Carbo said he and Housing Director Stacy L. Spann will bring the issue back at the Aug. 18 meeting in the county's Gateway building.
NEWS
January 5, 2009
Evidence condemns the death penalty I object very strenuously to the title of Scott D. Shellenberger's column "Evidence supports death penalty in Md." (Commentary, Dec. 30). He admits that the Maryland Commission on Capital Punishment voted 13-9 for repeal of the death penalty. So obviously the majority of commission members believe the evidence calls for an end to executions. Those of us who attended the commission's open hearings know that the evidence indicated that racism, classism, geographical disparities, etc., affect the application of the death penalty in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,jennifer.mcmenamin@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
As a police chief in New Jersey, James P. Abbott believed in the death penalty. He supported capital punishment as a way of protecting not only the public, but specifically his fellow officers and the correctional guards working in prisons. Then he spent a year serving on a New Jersey commission that studied the death penalty, and he completely reversed his view. "It turned out that what sounded good in theory was actually a complete failure in practice," he told members of Maryland's capital punishment commission yesterday in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
Benjamin R. Civiletti, a prominent Baltimore lawyer and former U.S. attorney general who once called for a national moratorium on capital punishment, will head a state commission studying the death penalty in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. The commission begins its deliberations as O'Malley, a staunch death-penalty opponent, has moved toward ending Maryland's de facto moratorium on executions by ordering the drafting of procedures for the use of lethal injection. O'Malley, a Democrat, made that decision on the advice of legal counsel after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Kentucky's use of lethal injection protocols that are virtually identical to Maryland's.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
A Carroll County Circuit Court judge has dismissed an $80 million lawsuit filed by former ethics commission members, who had accused the county commissioners of taking malicious action against the ethics panel before the members were forced to resign. Filed in December, the lawsuit claimed the county commissioners wrongfully fired ethics commission members James F.W. Talley, Suzanne Primoff and John Harner. Harner died before the lawsuit was filed. The lawsuit linked the dismissals to an ethics commission investigation of Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge, who was cleared of any wrongdoing.
NEWS
May 9, 2007
Horses aren't the only thing hoofing it at Pimlico these days. The Maryland Racing Commission was run out of there last week - by Gov. Martin O'Malley, who decided that an agency that's supposed to be regulating the track probably shouldn't be in bed with its owner. Magna Entertainment Corp., which owns the Maryland Jockey Club, agreed to lease office space at Pimlico to the commission for a $1 a year, utilities included. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and the Board of Public Works approved the deal in the closing days of the Ehrlich administration.
NEWS
By David Sanger and David Sanger,New York Times News Service | November 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A draft report on strategies for Iraq, which will be debated here by a bipartisan commission beginning today, urges an aggressive regional diplomatic initiative that includes direct talks with Iran and Syria but sets no timetables for a military withdrawal, according to officials who have seen all or parts of the document. While the diplomatic strategy appears likely to be accepted, with some amendments, by the 10-member Iraq Study Group, members of the commission and outsiders involved in its work said they expect a potentially divisive debate about timetables for beginning an American withdrawal.
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