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January 21, 2010
A state research commission said Wednesday that it received 141 applications from commercial and nonprofit groups that are seeking funding to support stem-cell research. The Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission's research fund has an annual budget of $12.4 million. Total requests for funding from applicants for fiscal 2010 surpassed $45 million, the commission said. The commission provides grants for research, including for scientists new to the stem-cell field, for those in the early phases of research and for postdoctoral fellows.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman's Commission on Excellence will hold a public meeting on June 13. The meeting is planned for 6 p.m. at the Arundel Center, 44 Calvert St. in Annapolis. Neuman created the commission to conduct a review of all of the county government's departments. The commission is tasked with issuing recommendations for "developing best practices for efficient service delivery to citizens. " Questions about the commission can be addressed to Dave Cordle, chief of staff, or Julie Mussog, special assistant, at 410-222-1821.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
A coalition that advocates for cuts to military spending is calling on Maryland to establish a military downsizing commission to help the state deal with the result of reductions already underway. Fund Our Communities, made up of 60-some political, veteran, faith and union organizations, said Wednesday that it is asking legislators to launch a jobs-focused commission "tasked with developing plans and policies to ensure a competitive advantage for Maryland" as military spending falls.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance was named this week to the federal Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans by President Barack Obama. The commission was created in 2012 and is tasked with identifying ways to increase the number of black teachers and administrators, boosting their college enrollment and graduation rates, and investing in early childhood education programs. The commission is chaired by University of Maryland, Baltimore County President Freeman A. Hrabowski III. Other members include Gwendolyn E. Boyd, president of Alabama State University; Sharon J. Lettman-Hicks, executive director and chief executive officer of the National Black Justice Coalition; and Michael L. Lomax, president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund.
EXPLORE
November 16, 2011
As a member of the 2011 Councilmanic Redistricting Commission, I write with great disappointment over the commission's decision. The map that has been recommended is a slap in the face to all those citizens who came out in support of keeping their communities together as much as possible. Residents of Brampton and Wheatfield pleaded their case that they have the most in common with their neighbors across Montgomery Road, Ellicott City and the rest of District 1. A point was made several times that while residents visit Columbia occasionally, they shop, worship and go to school in the Ellicott City area.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
A citizens' commission has given Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman a long to-do list for improving county government. After meeting for eight months, the 45-member Commission on Excellence recommended Tuesday a suite of changes ranging from updating software to providing customer service training to zoning inspectors. Neuman announced the recommendations on Tuesday at an event in Glen Burnie, then held a Twitter chat to discuss the report. "We don't want to create a report and put it on a shelf," Neuman said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Maryland said today that it has formed a commission that, among other tasks, will recommend which of seven athletic teams - eliminated in budget cuts last June 30 - may be reinstated. The commission will be headed by Barry Gossett, a regent and top donor, and Linda Clement, vice president for student affairs. In 2011, Gossett and Clement were co-chairs of the commission that recommended that eight of the university's 27 teams be discontinued because of severe, longstanding budget issues.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
A University of Maryland commission concluded that the school cannot adequately support 27 teams and recommended eliminating eight of them to create "a leaner, stronger athletic program. " The teams, which compete in six different sports, are: men's tennis, men's track and field (indoor, outdoor and cross country), men's swimming and diving, women's swimming and diving, women's water polo and women's acrobatics and tumbling, formerly called "competitive cheer. " The 17-member commission suggested Maryland has had to spread itself thin with so many teams -- five more than the average for the Atlantic Coast Conference's public universities.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance was named this week to the federal Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans by President Barack Obama. The commission was created in 2012 and is tasked with identifying ways to increase the number of black teachers and administrators, boosting their college enrollment and graduation rates, and investing in early childhood education programs. The commission is chaired by University of Maryland, Baltimore County President Freeman A. Hrabowski III. Other members include Gwendolyn E. Boyd, president of Alabama State University; Sharon J. Lettman-Hicks, executive director and chief executive officer of the National Black Justice Coalition; and Michael L. Lomax, president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Ocean City officials plan to meet again after Labor Day to discuss tightening the rules around short-term rentals in some residential neighborhoods. The city hosted a public hearing Tuesday for people to air their opinions on the subject. Some residents have called for a ban of weekly rentals in single-family neighborhoods, which they say disrupt the quality of life and character of those areas. The proposal has prompted pushback from other property owners, who say restricting rentals would violate property rights, hurt people's investments and make the resort town less appealing to families.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ruling that the popular ride-sharing company Uber Technologies is subject to the same regulations imposed on other for-hire vehicle services in the state, state regulators at the same time ordered a revision of those rules to reflect the changing business. The Maryland Public Service Commission ruled Wednesday that Uber is a common carrier like other for-hire car services, a decision that the company opposed, saying it threatened its business model. Yet the commission also ordered its staff to begin crafting new rules for such for-hire companies, saying it recognizes "that many industry changes and technological advances have occurred since these regulations were adopted, including the everyday use of the Internet.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
A proposed liquefied natural gas facility in Calvert County could put nearby residents at "significant risk" if a fire or explosion occurs, according to a British consulting firm hired by opponents of the project to review its hazards. Ricardo-AEA, commissioned by some nearby residents and the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, concluded that plans to convert the Cove Point import terminal for liquefied natural gas into one processing and exporting large quantities of the volatile fuel pose additional, possibly "intolerable" risks for workers at the site and people living within eight-tenths of a mile of it. "My view is that the project shouldn't be allowed to go forward, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the risks are not 'intolerable,' and that the risks have been reduced to a level which is as low as reasonably practicable," said Mark Broomfield, author of the report.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A Baltimore County historical commission delayed a decision Thursday that would push forward a Baltimore County public school plan to renovate and reuse Loch Raven Elementary School. More than a dozen community members attended the commission's meeting and voiced opposition to the school system's plan, saying the building's current use as a community center fits the neighborhood's needs. Architects for the school system argued that their $35 million plan - which would demolish all of a 1970 portion and part of a 1949 addition to the 1947 building - would return the school to its original use and allow it to continue to serve as a focal point for the Loch Raven Village neighborhood.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Annapolis and the Naval Academy are preparing for a week of festivities to mark the end of the academic year and the commissioning of a new batch of officers - including a return of the Navy's Blue Angels elite flight team. The Blue Angels have not performed their traditional Commissioning Week shows over the Severn River since 2010. The 2011 performance was canceled after a safety concern emerged at another air show, the 2012 show was canceled because of a scheduling conflict and the 2013 show was a victim of federal government budget cuts.
NEWS
July 22, 2004
Anne Arundel County Councilwoman Cathleen M. Vitale was appointed to the state Critical Area Commission yesterday. The Severna Park Republican will serve a four-year term on the panel, which helps set policy for environmentally protected areas along the Chesapeake Bay. "I am honored that the governor felt that my knowledge of and commitment to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries would be an asset to the commission," Vitale said in a statement....
NEWS
March 11, 1998
Sykesville's Town Council approved an ordinance Monday creating a seven-member commission.The commission will work closely with the business community and will offer its recommendations on the downtown revitalization project and the renovation of the Warfield Complex at Springfield Hospital Center.Councilman Bill Hall is expected to serve as the commission chair. Mayor Jonathan S. Herman will announce within a month other appointments, all of whom must be confirmed by the council.Pub Date: 3/11/98
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
— Amid warnings that slashing the striped bass catch by a third next year could devastate Chesapeake Bay commercial fishermen, Atlantic states regulators agreed Tuesday to consider reducing the catch more gradually over three years. Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission made so many other changes to a proposal for protecting Maryland's state fish from a troubling decline that they could not finish reviewing it until Wednesday — and likely put off taking final action by three months, until fall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Worried by recent declines in the numbers of Maryland's state fish, Atlantic states fisheries regulators are weighing slashing the annual striped bass catch by up to one-third next year all along the East Coast and in the Chesapeake Bay. The proposal, to be aired Tuesday before the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, comes six months after a study found the striped bass population verging on being overfished and the number of spawning female...
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