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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | August 2, 1993
It's quite a shock to meet Michael Chiklis.One expects a roly-poly guy in his late 30s. After all, that's what he plays on ABC's "The Commish." Mr. Chiklis stars in the detective series as Tony Scali, a warmhearted New York police commissioner with two kids who is losing his hair and could stand to shed a few pounds.The fact of the matter is, the blue-eyed Massachusetts native is just 29. Mr. Chiklis has lost 40 pounds by working out and eliminating fat from his diet. After the first season of "The Commish," Mr. Chiklis says, he made up his mind to lose the excess poundage.
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SPORTS
August 16, 2010
He has earned a break Ethan J. Skolnick Sun Sentinel The arbitrary nature of Roger Goodell's discipline should make all sports fans uncomfortable. There seems to be little rhyme, reason or consistency to his punishment. It's all fairly random. But if he chooses to impose an indefinite suspension — with wiggle room between the high and low limits of the athlete's absence — then he must reward the athlete for living up to whatever conditions he set. And so far, Ben Roethlisberger hasn't done anything since the suspension that would warrant keeping him out the maximum six weeks.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 27, 1991
A funny thing happened to "The Commish" between the episode ABC was going to premiere and the one it will air instead tomorrow night: The series found a new and intriguing direction.The police drama, which debuts at 10 p.m. on WJZ (Channel 13), originally had the look of a second-rate "Hill Street Blues." Though the pilot centered on suburban police commissioner Tony Scali (Michael Chiklis), it was suffused by a dark vision of mean streets and how hard it is to be a good cop in a society full of criminals with too many rights.
NEWS
August 15, 2009
When you get caught red-handed by Baltimore's top cop, you'd think some time in the slammer was a pretty sure bet. But that's not what happened to two brothers, Devin and Davon Rogers, who were arrested New Year's Day by none other than city Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, who chased the men down and slapped the cuffs on them after spotting them firing shotguns into the air in the Shipley Hill neighborhood. On Monday, a city judge accepted a plea deal putting both men on probation but allowing them to avoid prison time.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 27, 1999
Commish Frazier is leaving to hand out federal police aid to cities, and some bar singer who would be mayor gratuitously maligns him. Lord save us.Bill and Congress are playing games over the budget and taxes, and heading into overtime.Big bully Russia is bombing poor little Chechnya! Let's not bomb Russia.The Court of Appeals decided that a tax break for a hotel on land the city does not own is legal. It did not rule on whether one so far from the convention center ever made sense.Think of Hurricane Floyd as practice for the big one ahead.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 22, 1994
There's nothing like it. The October classic. Game 1 of the 1994 World Series. That's what was on the schedule tonight, but this year, thanks to the strike, there IS nothing like it. Instead of the World Series, ABC is showing "The Commish" -- and not even the commish of baseball.* "The Commish." (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- How quickly they rise, and fall. Dan Cortese went from Burger King commercials and MTV host to co-starring with George C. Scott in a series called -- well, can YOU remember it?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 1, 1994
Either the seasons are getting longer, or the patience of network executives is getting shorter. A new fall series will premiere tonight, but others already have been yanked from the schedule. Tonight's new addition: NBC's "Something Wilder," starring Gene Wilder.* "Something Wilder" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Gene Wilder and Hillary B. Smith play husband and wife, with typical TV-adorable twins, in this new sitcom that has gotten pasted by advance reviews. It's not actually that horrible -- like most of the new series this fall, it's relentlessly average -- but the laugh track on this particular series, turned up about 30 notches too high, makes "Something Wilder" virtually unbearable.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 2, 1995
The February sweeps are in full swing, with the networks throwing out their best bait to lure viewers.* "Mad About You" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 11) -- Perhaps because this show sees more comic possibilities when it looks back than when it looks ahead, "Mad About You" recounts the months leading up to the wedding of Paul and Jamie (Paul Reiser, Helen Hunt). NBC.* "Seinfeld" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 11) -- In this one-hour "Seinfeld," the folks behind "Seinfeld" celebrate their 100th episode.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 8, 1994
Slide on that jumpsuit and lace up those blue suede shoes. Tonight's the night of the big pay-per-view Elvis tribute.* "Summertime Switch" (8-10 p.m., Channel 13) -- Jason Weaver and Rider Strong star as kids with similar names who mistakenly get sent to the wrong summer camps: one posh, the other brutal. In this original ABC family telemovie, friends are made, lessons learned, and viewers in search of intelligent family TV are advised to switch rather than "Switch." ABC.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8-9 p.m., Channel 11)
SPORTS
August 16, 2010
He has earned a break Ethan J. Skolnick Sun Sentinel The arbitrary nature of Roger Goodell's discipline should make all sports fans uncomfortable. There seems to be little rhyme, reason or consistency to his punishment. It's all fairly random. But if he chooses to impose an indefinite suspension — with wiggle room between the high and low limits of the athlete's absence — then he must reward the athlete for living up to whatever conditions he set. And so far, Ben Roethlisberger hasn't done anything since the suspension that would warrant keeping him out the maximum six weeks.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 25, 2008
And you thought Baltimore couldn't keep a police commissioner. Frederick Bealefeld hit the six-month mark this week. That's especially noteworthy because under the City Charter, Bealefeld had until then to move to the city. He made it, but just barely. The Baltimore City Charter requires department heads to live in the city. There is a six-month grace period. But if they miss that, the charter states, "the appointment shall be terminated." Bealefeld lived in Bel Air when he was sworn in on Nov. 20, so he had until last Tuesday to set up housekeeping in Charm City, The Sun's Annie Linskey reports.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
It was a bitter 43 degrees outside, one of winter's last gasps before spring. The wind whipped through the trees surrounding the Towson YMCA, and bundled, morning gymgoers hurried through the front door. But on the Y's tennis courts, "The Commish," 77, gave a macho shrug. "This is warm," he said, tennis racket in hand. He was wearing wind pants, a blue winter jacket and a white baseball cap. "You should have seen us in the snow." The "Commish" -- short for Commissioner, a title earned when he remembered the score one day -- also goes by the name of Andrew A. Lioi, a retired attorney from Hamilton.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 27, 1999
Commish Frazier is leaving to hand out federal police aid to cities, and some bar singer who would be mayor gratuitously maligns him. Lord save us.Bill and Congress are playing games over the budget and taxes, and heading into overtime.Big bully Russia is bombing poor little Chechnya! Let's not bomb Russia.The Court of Appeals decided that a tax break for a hotel on land the city does not own is legal. It did not rule on whether one so far from the convention center ever made sense.Think of Hurricane Floyd as practice for the big one ahead.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 2, 1995
The February sweeps are in full swing, with the networks throwing out their best bait to lure viewers.* "Mad About You" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 11) -- Perhaps because this show sees more comic possibilities when it looks back than when it looks ahead, "Mad About You" recounts the months leading up to the wedding of Paul and Jamie (Paul Reiser, Helen Hunt). NBC.* "Seinfeld" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 11) -- In this one-hour "Seinfeld," the folks behind "Seinfeld" celebrate their 100th episode.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 22, 1994
There's nothing like it. The October classic. Game 1 of the 1994 World Series. That's what was on the schedule tonight, but this year, thanks to the strike, there IS nothing like it. Instead of the World Series, ABC is showing "The Commish" -- and not even the commish of baseball.* "The Commish." (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- How quickly they rise, and fall. Dan Cortese went from Burger King commercials and MTV host to co-starring with George C. Scott in a series called -- well, can YOU remember it?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 8, 1994
Slide on that jumpsuit and lace up those blue suede shoes. Tonight's the night of the big pay-per-view Elvis tribute.* "Summertime Switch" (8-10 p.m., Channel 13) -- Jason Weaver and Rider Strong star as kids with similar names who mistakenly get sent to the wrong summer camps: one posh, the other brutal. In this original ABC family telemovie, friends are made, lessons learned, and viewers in search of intelligent family TV are advised to switch rather than "Switch." ABC.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8-9 p.m., Channel 11)
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 25, 2008
And you thought Baltimore couldn't keep a police commissioner. Frederick Bealefeld hit the six-month mark this week. That's especially noteworthy because under the City Charter, Bealefeld had until then to move to the city. He made it, but just barely. The Baltimore City Charter requires department heads to live in the city. There is a six-month grace period. But if they miss that, the charter states, "the appointment shall be terminated." Bealefeld lived in Bel Air when he was sworn in on Nov. 20, so he had until last Tuesday to set up housekeeping in Charm City, The Sun's Annie Linskey reports.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
It was a bitter 43 degrees outside, one of winter's last gasps before spring. The wind whipped through the trees surrounding the Towson YMCA, and bundled, morning gymgoers hurried through the front door. But on the Y's tennis courts, "The Commish," 77, gave a macho shrug. "This is warm," he said, tennis racket in hand. He was wearing wind pants, a blue winter jacket and a white baseball cap. "You should have seen us in the snow." The "Commish" -- short for Commissioner, a title earned when he remembered the score one day -- also goes by the name of Andrew A. Lioi, a retired attorney from Hamilton.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 1, 1994
Either the seasons are getting longer, or the patience of network executives is getting shorter. A new fall series will premiere tonight, but others already have been yanked from the schedule. Tonight's new addition: NBC's "Something Wilder," starring Gene Wilder.* "Something Wilder" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Gene Wilder and Hillary B. Smith play husband and wife, with typical TV-adorable twins, in this new sitcom that has gotten pasted by advance reviews. It's not actually that horrible -- like most of the new series this fall, it's relentlessly average -- but the laugh track on this particular series, turned up about 30 notches too high, makes "Something Wilder" virtually unbearable.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 28, 1994
American Joe Miedusiewski brought Barney Fife out of mothballs strictly by accident. Barney never had a bullet to call his own, and neither, it turns out, did Parris Glendening. But everybody who watched Andy Griffith knew about poor Barney's plight, while nobody around here knew the facts about Glendening.Former police commissioner, Glendening was calling himself. He was saying this in the television commercials he launched several weeks back, geared specifically toward Baltimore voters who had never even heard of Glendening until he started running for governor.
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