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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Maybe you've heard these phrases before: "If you have a phone, you have an attorney. " "You're making a big mistake. " "Nobody bothers me. " "Jack says 'Yes.'" For better or worse, these are the catchphrases of Baltimore advertising, lines delivered incessantly by TV pitchmen who, not coincidentally, own the businesses they're pitching. They're not actors, and they might not have the greatest voices in the world. But they certainly are one thing: everywhere. And they're definitely another thing: effective.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 9, 2014
Our topic du jour: the latest stunning milestone in the march toward gay equality. No, the other stunning milestone. We will get around to what the Supreme Court did (more accurately, declined to do) in a moment. But first: Have you seen the new Cheerios commercial? It broke out online a few days ago, a spot starring these two gay French Canadian men and their adopted daughter, a brown-skinned (African-Canadian?) toddler named Raphaelle. In the three-minute clip, Andre and Jonathan talk about the love at first sight blind date that brought them together and how they thought they could never be dads because they are gay. All the while, Raphaelle is squirming, eating Cheerios, leaning from one father to the other and otherwise committing shameless acts of cuteness.
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NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
The brainchild of a Maryland native was a winner on Super Bowl Sunday, as the "Doritos Time Machine" commercial created by Raj Suri aired during the first half. Suri, an Ellicott City native now living in Arizona, created a finalist for the $1 million Super Bowl advertising contest hosted by Doritos. The commercial, directed by Suri's friend Ryan Anderson and starring Anderson's son, aired early in Sunday's game. It wasn't immediately clear if Suri's ad won the $1 million prize.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
NEWS
October 27, 1993
For far too long, too many broadcasters have been accustomed to treating children's television programming as an inexhaustible cash cow, a venue for selling everything from sugar-coated flakes to anatomically correct dolls and frighteningly realistic toy weapons.In an effort to protect unsophisticated young audiences, Congress passed the Children's Television Act of 1990, which limits the number of commercials that can be shown with children's television. But broadcasters routinely ignore the law, cramming in as many commercials as the market will bear.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff Gail Stephanie Miles contributed to this story | June 20, 1991
WHEN MR. WHIPPLE, the man who told us not to squeeze the Charmin, gets a standing ovation, you know something different is going on.Turns out it was the periodic renewal of the love affair between Baltimore and Oprah Winfrey that took place yesterday afternoon at the Convention Center.Who else but Winfrey could get a couple thousand local residents to sit through an hour of what they usually try to avoid -- commercials -- and have them love it?The taping of this Winfrey show -- scheduled to air on July 2 -- was held at the Convention Center in conjunction with the annual gathering of the Broadcast Promotion and Marketing Executives (BPME)
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | September 15, 1996
SO I TURNED ON MY car radio, and the first thing I heard was the Shouting Car-Dealership Jerk. You know the one I mean. He sounds like this:"BELOW DEALER COST!! MAX SNOTWICK FORD DODGE ISUZU CHEVROLET NISSAN STUDEBAKER TOYOTA IS SELLING CARS AT BELOW DEALER COST!! WE'RE LOSING MONEY ON THESE CARS!! WE HAVE TO MAKE ROOM FOR MORE CARS!! SO WE CAN LOSE MORE MONEY!! WE HAVE PROCESSED CHEESE FOR BRAINS!! THAT'S WHY WE'RE SELLING CARS FOR BELOW DEALER "I immediately did what I always do when the Shouting Car-Dealership Jerk comes on: I changed the station.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Robert Lee "Bob" Bell, who began his career in auto sales in the 1950s and went on to own the Bob Bell Automotive Group, one of the state's largest car dealers, died Sunday of leukemia at theUniversity of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident, who earlier had lived in Laurel, was 78. Born and raised in Alexandria, Va., Mr. Bell was appointed a Capitol Hill U.S. Senate page and graduated from the Senate Page School. "He was a page for Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn," said a daughter, Mary Catherine Bishop of Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 16, 1990
The collection of prize-winning commercials opening today at the Charles under the title "Cannes Goods III" is enjoyable, but its lessons are by this time commonplace.Taken together the commercials simply illustrate a principle that has been obvious on the feature screen for some time now, and explain why so many commercial directors end up as feature directors, and that's simply because the methodology of television advertising has so aped the methodology of the feature film that by now they are nearly interchangeable.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 23, 2000
In a sense, American tennis fans won't notice much of a difference as TNT and CNN/SI take over coverage of the Wimbledon fortnight from their corporate cousin, HBO, next week. After all, analysts Mary Carillo and Martina Navratilova will make the move from pay cable to basic cable, as well as many members of the production crew. But the one change they will notice is commercials, absent from HBO, but ever present on TNT and CNN/SI, which will have to pay for the 89 hours of coverage somehow.
NEWS
By Thomas Wise | September 4, 2014
Despite going by the same name, American football and what the rest of the world considers football are completely different games. They have a different level of physicality as well as an entirely different pace. Part of this difference in the pace of the game comes from the way the organizations that oversee these two sports, FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) and the NFL (National Football League), choose to monetize their games. If you caught any of The FIFA World Cup this summer you saw the games without any pauses for advertisements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Frank J. Russell, the former owner of a carpet company who was a longtime Salvation Army volunteer and an accomplished portrait artist, died of pneumonia Aug. 28 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 79. "He was a very gifted artist, and there is nothing phony about him," said Mel Leipzig, a Trenton, N.J., artist and a longtime friend. "He was an extremely genuine person, and as an artist there is great sincerity in his work. " He was born Frank Joseph Russello in Brooklyn, N.Y., but later changed his name to Frank Joseph Russell, family members said.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Ravens coach John Harbaugh and his brother, San Francisco 49ers coach John Harbaugh, avoided questions about how they were alike and how they were different during joint practices last week. Now that the dust has settled, John Harbaugh had a little fun Monday at the expense of his brother's television commercials - and his own. “Coming to a theater near you,” John Harbaugh said of their acting skills during a light moment at the end of his media session Monday. Harbaugh was asked about his new role in M&T Bank commercials, on which he seemed eager to get notes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Harold H. Hogg, founder of a Central Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania commercial construction company who endowed the Hogg Family Chair at Duke University, his alma mater, died June 3 of leukemia at the Moorings Park retirement community in Naples, Fla. The former York, Pa., resident was 86. The son of Dr. William L. Hogg, a United Methodist minister, and Mildred R. Hogg, a Latin teacher, Harold Hubert Hogg was born and raised in Leechburg, Pa....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Calvin K. Kobsa, a semiretired Baltimore architect who was the founder of Calvin Kern Kobsa & Associates, died May 10 of complications after brain surgery at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 86. "Calvin will be remembered as a kind soul and a good architect," said Walter G. Schamu, founder and president of the Baltimore architectural firm of Schamu Machowski + Patterson. "He was always interested in the other person's career and was always a very friendly and affable fellow.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
HOWARD COUNTY Executive Charles I. Ecker has swapped his tortoise shell for rabbit's feet. His opponent in the Republican race for governor, Ellen R. Sauerbrey, left the starting blocks four years ago, and has not slowed since, criss-crossing the state to build on the name recognition that would satisfy most incumbents.If Mr. Ecker hopes to catch Mrs. Sauerbrey, who narrowly lost the 1994 general election for governor, he needs to energize a campaign that has mirrored his low-key personality to date.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign for governor released its fifth television ad on Monday.  While his previous commercials have been largely biographical, this one focuses on education - specifically, his plan for expansion of pre-Kindergarten education. The ad aims to capitalize on Brown's endorsement from the Maryland State Education Association, the state's largest teachers' union. “Maryland has some of the best schools in the country, but we can do better,” Brown says in the spot, which prominently mentions the endorsement.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign for governor released its fifth television ad on Monday.  While his previous commercials have been largely biographical, this one focuses on education - specifically, his plan for expansion of pre-Kindergarten education. The ad aims to capitalize on Brown's endorsement from the Maryland State Education Association, the state's largest teachers' union. “Maryland has some of the best schools in the country, but we can do better,” Brown says in the spot, which prominently mentions the endorsement.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a naval air station in Southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River. The House voted 114-11 later Saturday to give the measure final approval. Assembly action sends the bill to O'Malley — who opposes it and has not said if he will sign it into law. Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore wind project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, an economic engine for the region.
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