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NEWS
July 5, 1996
THE SUPREME COURT'S order for a lower court to review Baltimore's ban on billboards promoting cigarette smoking came as no surprise; in May, the court issued a similar order for the city's ban on liquor billboards in some city neighborhoods. In both cases, the review was prompted by the court's decision in a Rhode Island case, which included new guidelines for weighing the constitutionality of limitations on commercial speech.In that decision, the Supreme Court threw out a 40-year-old Rhode Island law banning all public advertising of liquor prices.
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NEWS
By Robert Koulish | July 22, 2007
Former Vice President Al Gore and rock star Bono come from vastly different backgrounds, but this summer they have a lot in common. Each has been engaged in an extraordinary promotional campaign for a social cause, culminating in a highly commercialized media spectacle. For Mr. Gore, it was the Live Earth concert; for Bono, it was a special issue of Vanity Fair that he edited, featuring the Red Campaign to bring heightened awareness of Africa's AIDS epidemic. These efforts are changing the face of grass-roots politics, perhaps even forcing society to reconsider what it means to be politically involved.
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NEWS
May 23, 1996
FREE SPEECH is a cherished touchstone of American constitutional rights, but it does not come without a price. A recent Supreme Court decision, along with a subsequent order from the high court, could bring deep disappointment to community activists who have worked diligently to improve their neighborhoods by limiting the profusion of unsightly billboards advertising liquor, tobacco and other harmful products.Earlier this month, the court threw out a Rhode Island law that prohibited liquor dealers from advertising prices, ruling that government cannot seek to protect citizens from harmful but legal habits at the expense of the free speech rights of businesses.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Shiva Sundaram spends his days listening to his computer laugh at him. Someday, you may know how it feels. The University of Southern California engineer is one of a growing number of researchers trying to crack the next barrier in computer speech synthesis - emotion. In labs around the world, computers are starting to laugh and sigh, express joy and anger, and even hesitate with natural ums and ahs. Called expressive speech synthesis, "it's the hot area" in the field today, says Ellen Eide of IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., which plans to introduce a version of its commercial speech synthesizer that incorporates the new technology.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Street-corner news boxes cannot be se aside only for newspapers but may have to be opened to a wide variety of other circulars, fliers, commercial magazines and promotional items, the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 yesterday.A publication cannot be banned from sidewalk vending machines simply because it is commercial in nature, when newspapers are allowed to be sold in those boxes, the court made clear.The new ruling appeared to be one of the most significant in years on the constitutional status of what is called "commercial speech" -- publications, circulars, handbills or fliers that promote a commercial transaction or opportunity.
NEWS
By Robert Koulish | July 22, 2007
Former Vice President Al Gore and rock star Bono come from vastly different backgrounds, but this summer they have a lot in common. Each has been engaged in an extraordinary promotional campaign for a social cause, culminating in a highly commercialized media spectacle. For Mr. Gore, it was the Live Earth concert; for Bono, it was a special issue of Vanity Fair that he edited, featuring the Red Campaign to bring heightened awareness of Africa's AIDS epidemic. These efforts are changing the face of grass-roots politics, perhaps even forcing society to reconsider what it means to be politically involved.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 2, 2003
BOSTON -- I have always considered myself a First Amendment junkie. But this is where I sign up for rehab. You want to tell me that a telemarketer has a constitutional right to interrupt my dinner with an offer to corrugate my roof? You want me to defend the free-speech rights of the guy who jars me out of the shower to push some credit card? You want me to believe that blocking access to my kitchen phone is a blow against the First Amendment? Finally, in this fractious, cranky country, Americans have something they agree on. Fifty million fed-up citizens signed up for the do-not-call registry.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
Harford County businessman Douglas Verzi arrived at his nursery on Route 23 recently to find nearly a dozen telephone messages about the new billboard on the hill next door - all angry, all assuming the "eyesore" belonged to him. But Verzi was angry, too. The sign wasn't his; Apple Outdoor Advertising - the company that owns the billboard - had approached Verzi a year earlier and offered him $650 a month if he would put the sign on his land. He said no. "This is countryside," he said.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - Three years ago, to settle a major lawsuit filed by 46 states, the nation's largest cigarette manufacturers agreed to extensive limits on tobacco advertising, including a complete ban on outdoor billboards. Yesterday, those same companies went before the Supreme Court to argue that more sweeping restrictions imposed by Massachusetts violate federal law and the manufacturers' right to free speech. The outcome of the case could determine how far states and cities can go beyond the 1998 settlement in regulating the placement of tobacco ads. Much of the one-hour argument turned on the meaning of a 1969 law that forbids states from imposing advertising regulations that are "based on smoking and health."
NEWS
By Mark Braun | January 30, 1991
THE PARTY'S over, Spuds."This is the message beer and wine companies may soon be hearing from government officials charged with advertising regulation. Efforts are currently under way at both the national and local levels to restrict some or all forms of alcohol advertising. In Washington State, for example, a Seattle pediatrician is leading a movement to force beer companies to advertise without references to "sex, feats of daring and the use of sports legends." If these restrictions are approved today by the Washington State Liquor Control Board, its members will be empowered to reject ads which allegedly use these tactics.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 23, 2004
WILKES-BARRE, Pa. - President Bush declared security the overriding issue in the presidential race yesterday and charged that John Kerry cannot see the dangers facing the nation, as the campaigns engaged in a rapid-fire television ad war over who could best protect Americans. "All progress on every other issue depends on the safety of our citizens," Bush said here in a retooled stump speech, which sought to sway social conservatives with a focus on his agenda for families. "When it comes to your security, the choice in this election could not be clearer.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 2, 2003
BOSTON -- I have always considered myself a First Amendment junkie. But this is where I sign up for rehab. You want to tell me that a telemarketer has a constitutional right to interrupt my dinner with an offer to corrugate my roof? You want me to defend the free-speech rights of the guy who jars me out of the shower to push some credit card? You want me to believe that blocking access to my kitchen phone is a blow against the First Amendment? Finally, in this fractious, cranky country, Americans have something they agree on. Fifty million fed-up citizens signed up for the do-not-call registry.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
Harford County businessman Douglas Verzi arrived at his nursery on Route 23 recently to find nearly a dozen telephone messages about the new billboard on the hill next door - all angry, all assuming the "eyesore" belonged to him. But Verzi was angry, too. The sign wasn't his; Apple Outdoor Advertising - the company that owns the billboard - had approached Verzi a year earlier and offered him $650 a month if he would put the sign on his land. He said no. "This is countryside," he said.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - Three years ago, to settle a major lawsuit filed by 46 states, the nation's largest cigarette manufacturers agreed to extensive limits on tobacco advertising, including a complete ban on outdoor billboards. Yesterday, those same companies went before the Supreme Court to argue that more sweeping restrictions imposed by Massachusetts violate federal law and the manufacturers' right to free speech. The outcome of the case could determine how far states and cities can go beyond the 1998 settlement in regulating the placement of tobacco ads. Much of the one-hour argument turned on the meaning of a 1969 law that forbids states from imposing advertising regulations that are "based on smoking and health."
NEWS
July 5, 1996
THE SUPREME COURT'S order for a lower court to review Baltimore's ban on billboards promoting cigarette smoking came as no surprise; in May, the court issued a similar order for the city's ban on liquor billboards in some city neighborhoods. In both cases, the review was prompted by the court's decision in a Rhode Island case, which included new guidelines for weighing the constitutionality of limitations on commercial speech.In that decision, the Supreme Court threw out a 40-year-old Rhode Island law banning all public advertising of liquor prices.
NEWS
May 23, 1996
FREE SPEECH is a cherished touchstone of American constitutional rights, but it does not come without a price. A recent Supreme Court decision, along with a subsequent order from the high court, could bring deep disappointment to community activists who have worked diligently to improve their neighborhoods by limiting the profusion of unsightly billboards advertising liquor, tobacco and other harmful products.Earlier this month, the court threw out a Rhode Island law that prohibited liquor dealers from advertising prices, ruling that government cannot seek to protect citizens from harmful but legal habits at the expense of the free speech rights of businesses.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Shiva Sundaram spends his days listening to his computer laugh at him. Someday, you may know how it feels. The University of Southern California engineer is one of a growing number of researchers trying to crack the next barrier in computer speech synthesis - emotion. In labs around the world, computers are starting to laugh and sigh, express joy and anger, and even hesitate with natural ums and ahs. Called expressive speech synthesis, "it's the hot area" in the field today, says Ellen Eide of IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., which plans to introduce a version of its commercial speech synthesizer that incorporates the new technology.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 23, 2004
WILKES-BARRE, Pa. - President Bush declared security the overriding issue in the presidential race yesterday and charged that John Kerry cannot see the dangers facing the nation, as the campaigns engaged in a rapid-fire television ad war over who could best protect Americans. "All progress on every other issue depends on the safety of our citizens," Bush said here in a retooled stump speech, which sought to sway social conservatives with a focus on his agenda for families. "When it comes to your security, the choice in this election could not be clearer.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Street-corner news boxes cannot be se aside only for newspapers but may have to be opened to a wide variety of other circulars, fliers, commercial magazines and promotional items, the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 yesterday.A publication cannot be banned from sidewalk vending machines simply because it is commercial in nature, when newspapers are allowed to be sold in those boxes, the court made clear.The new ruling appeared to be one of the most significant in years on the constitutional status of what is called "commercial speech" -- publications, circulars, handbills or fliers that promote a commercial transaction or opportunity.
NEWS
By Mark Braun | January 30, 1991
THE PARTY'S over, Spuds."This is the message beer and wine companies may soon be hearing from government officials charged with advertising regulation. Efforts are currently under way at both the national and local levels to restrict some or all forms of alcohol advertising. In Washington State, for example, a Seattle pediatrician is leading a movement to force beer companies to advertise without references to "sex, feats of daring and the use of sports legends." If these restrictions are approved today by the Washington State Liquor Control Board, its members will be empowered to reject ads which allegedly use these tactics.
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