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BUSINESS
December 9, 1990
For house buyers and investors, 1991 may present the best property bargains in nearly 10 years," according to the December issue of Money magazine.Money cautions that a surplus of homes and apartments and local economic weakness will continue to depress values well into next year, but cites a projection by the WEFA Group research firm of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., that real estate markets in most areas are likely to bottom out in late 1991, as the oversupply shrinks.WEFA...
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Scammers targeting commercial property owners are claiming the businesses need to immediately pay a several-hundred-dollar charge to their electric utility, Maryland's attorney general warned Thursday. The scam is a variant of one aimed at residents. In this case, the callers pretend to be from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Pepco or other utilities and say the state is requiring a "GPS meter" be installed on all commercial properties, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Ann Fligsten, a noted land-use attorney in Anne Arundel County, has long voiced her opinion on planning and zoning issues, testifying before the County Council and meeting with county officials. As chairwoman of the Growth Action Network, Fligsten helped organize a lawsuit filed last month alleging that the County Council violated state law by passing several amendments to a zoning bill that would allow development that opponents believe is prohibited by long-established county guidelines.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
When the city sends Tom Clancy his property tax bill, finance officials might want to tuck in a thank-you note. The multimillionaire novelist's supersized digs at the Ritz-Carlton Residences along the Inner Harbor have by far the highest tax payment of any home in Baltimore this year — almost $350,000. That's more than all the payments from homeowners in some entire city neighborhoods. Property taxes on the 10 homes with the biggest bills, and the 10 commercial properties at the top of the heap, come to an eye-popping $20.7 million, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
The two contenders for Howard County's largest geographical County Council district spent 90 minutes Wednesday night in a Lisbon fire hall answering questions that ranged from deer hunting to downtown Columbia redevelopment. "This may have been longer than all the forums I've done since 1998 combined," incumbent Councilman Greg Fox, a Republican, told the more than 100 campaign partisans and residents who gathered for the Concerned Citizens of Western Howard County forum. He and Democratic candidate Zaneb Kahn "Zee" Beams were the sole participants, unlike most candidate forums that include the full range of county executive, council and General Assembly candidates.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
When the city sends Tom Clancy his property tax bill, finance officials might want to tuck in a thank-you note. The multimillionaire novelist's supersized digs at the Ritz-Carlton Residences along the Inner Harbor have by far the highest tax payment of any home in Baltimore this year — almost $350,000. That's more than all the payments from homeowners in some entire city neighborhoods. Property taxes on the 10 homes with the biggest bills, and the 10 commercial properties at the top of the heap, come to an eye-popping $20.7 million, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Scammers targeting commercial property owners are claiming the businesses need to immediately pay a several-hundred-dollar charge to their electric utility, Maryland's attorney general warned Thursday. The scam is a variant of one aimed at residents. In this case, the callers pretend to be from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Pepco or other utilities and say the state is requiring a "GPS meter" be installed on all commercial properties, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Nearly two dozen commercial properties, including the site of the old Tower Building downtown, will be auctioned June 7 as a marketing tool used to move distressed properties in other cities makes its Baltimore debut."
BUSINESS
February 22, 2004
Joseph Citrano Jr. of Baltimore County bought a commercial property for $100,000. It was listed as a 5,662-square-foot lot with a 20-by-60-foot one-story building and parking for eight to 10 cars. Two months after the purchase, Citrano wanted to build a fence to protect vehicles parked on the property. A neighbor claimed she had an easement over the property preventing such a fence. Citrano says he was not aware of any easement and that neither the real estate agent nor his title company told him that the property was subject to an easement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1997
A New York pension fund intends to buy a nearly completed Saks Holdings Inc. distribution center in Harford County this month for $27 million, further validating the region's exploding industrial property market.Teachers Insurance & Annuity Association's bid to acquire the Saks warehouse comes amid surging interest among institutional real estate owners, such as real estate investment trusts and pension fund consultants, for modern warehouses."Institutions like distribution centers because they provide good, stable yields, and they aren't as capital intensive as other investment opportunities, such as retail centers or office towers," said David P. Scheffenacker Jr., president of Preston Partners Inc., whose firm is representing Teachers in the transaction.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Ann Fligsten, a noted land-use attorney in Anne Arundel County, has long voiced her opinion on planning and zoning issues, testifying before the County Council and meeting with county officials. As chairwoman of the Growth Action Network, Fligsten helped organize a lawsuit filed last month alleging that the County Council violated state law by passing several amendments to a zoning bill that would allow development that opponents believe is prohibited by long-established county guidelines.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
At a time when many real estate companies are having trouble getting loans for expansion, Pikesville-based America's Realty is growing steadily. Headed by chief executive Carl Verstandig, it now controls 164 commercial developments in 13 states — a total of 21 million square feet of space housing 15,000 retailers. And Verstandig is looking to buy even more. His company recently acquired Long Reach Village Center, one of Columbia's original shopping areas, for $5.4 million. It is one of three commercial developments that America's Realty bought this fall in Central Maryland and marks the company's first venture in Howard County.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
The two contenders for Howard County's largest geographical County Council district spent 90 minutes Wednesday night in a Lisbon fire hall answering questions that ranged from deer hunting to downtown Columbia redevelopment. "This may have been longer than all the forums I've done since 1998 combined," incumbent Councilman Greg Fox, a Republican, told the more than 100 campaign partisans and residents who gathered for the Concerned Citizens of Western Howard County forum. He and Democratic candidate Zaneb Kahn "Zee" Beams were the sole participants, unlike most candidate forums that include the full range of county executive, council and General Assembly candidates.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Business leaders and landlords are proposing to raise a surcharge on downtown commercial properties this summer to make up for falling property values and to help pay for capital projects such as improving parks, installing additional video cameras and making the city more pedestrian-friendly. The increased role of the private sector comes as the city may be forced to cut public services. The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, which runs surcharge-funded programs aimed at keeping the area clean and safe, estimates the proposal would raise more than $1 million a year.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
Moving quickly to turn a vacant, sprawling apartment complex into a major new housing development, the administration of Mayor Martin O'Malley plans to introduce legislation today in the City Council to create the Uplands Renewal Area in Southwest Baltimore. Creating the renewal area will enable the city to enforce design standards on the site of the soon-to-be-demolished Uplands Apartments off Edmondson Avenue near the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line and to acquire and demolish 14 commercial properties bordering the complex to build residences.
BUSINESS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
A growing number of homebuilders are seeking out abandoned commercial properties for residential subdivisions as demand for housing continues to surge. The process of constructing homes in places once occupied by such things as hospitals or rock quarries is pricier and more complicated than converting the farmlands that builders prefer. But dwindling available land and zoning restrictions aimed at curbing sprawl are pushing more builders to give a second look at property they once would have ignored.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
At a time when many real estate companies are having trouble getting loans for expansion, Pikesville-based America's Realty is growing steadily. Headed by chief executive Carl Verstandig, it now controls 164 commercial developments in 13 states — a total of 21 million square feet of space housing 15,000 retailers. And Verstandig is looking to buy even more. His company recently acquired Long Reach Village Center, one of Columbia's original shopping areas, for $5.4 million. It is one of three commercial developments that America's Realty bought this fall in Central Maryland and marks the company's first venture in Howard County.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1999
When brothers Robert and Richard Manekin left their family-run real estate company for competitors earlier in this decade, neither envisioned working together again. Robert left Manekin Corp. in September 1992 to work in Washington for a national brokerage firm and later became president of locally based Casey & Associates Inc. Richard departed in January 1990 for the downtown office of CB Richard Ellis, a Los Angeles commercial real estate brokerage firm. But starting today, the two brothers -- with one-time Manekin Corp.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
The last time the office market was this lousy, Manekin LLC made a fleeting foray into residential development. This time, the Columbia company best known for building, brokering and managing offices says it has branched out for keeps. Projects in early stages in Harford County, Cecil County, Delaware and Pennsylvania will produce in excess of 3,500 lots over the long haul - more than a decade - for the company to sell to builders. "Rather than starting small, we're starting large," said Richard Alter, president and chief executive officer of the 150-employee company.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2004
Joseph Citrano Jr. of Baltimore County bought a commercial property for $100,000. It was listed as a 5,662-square-foot lot with a 20-by-60-foot one-story building and parking for eight to 10 cars. Two months after the purchase, Citrano wanted to build a fence to protect vehicles parked on the property. A neighbor claimed she had an easement over the property preventing such a fence. Citrano says he was not aware of any easement and that neither the real estate agent nor his title company told him that the property was subject to an easement.
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