Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommercial Fishing
IN THE NEWS

Commercial Fishing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 1, 1996
GLOUCESTER POINT, Va. - It may not worry nervous LTC swimmers much, but shark populations in the Chesapeake Bay are dropping sharply, a shark researcher says.Jack Musick of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science says shark fishing has depleted the numbers of some shark species in the region by 80 percent to 90 percent."Most of our fisheries have really been mining operations," Musick said. "This is the best indication we have of the true magnitude of the crash that's occurred."That crash is measured in the number of sharks Musick catches for every 100 baited hooks he sets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Maryland chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association is calling on the state to more efficiently manage the costs of commercial fisheries. Under the current structure, only 20 percent of the cost for managing the activities of commercial fisheries comes from license and permit fees, compared to 93 percent of the cost for managing recreational fishing. While federal grants account for another 23 percent of the cost of managing commercial fishing, it means that up to 57 percent comes from Maryland taxpayers.
Advertisement
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
The Ehrlich administration is proposing to end a 17-year moratorium on the commercial fishing of yellow perch in two Eastern Shore rivers - a proposal that is drawing criticism from environmentalists and recreational anglers who say the species is still scarce in Maryland waterways. Department of Natural Resources officials want to open the Choptank and Nanticoke rivers to commercial yellow perch fishing beginning this spring. The Nanticoke has been closed to all yellow perch fishing since 1990; the Choptank has been open to recreational anglers since 1992.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
With Baltimore in the midst of Restaurant Week, there are probably many happily dining on rockfish these days, and rightly so. Rockfish (more commonly known as striped bass) represent one of the Chesapeake Bay's most treasured bounties, both a worthy challenge to anglers and a delight on the dinner plate. But if there is a lingering bitterness surrounding the catch of the day, it is the still-fresh memory of last winter's poaching incidents. Natural Resources Police hauled in an estimated 26,000 pounds of rockfish caught illegally in unattended gill nets.
SPORTS
March 13, 1991
The Maryland legislature will debate whether rockfish, or striped bass, should be protected from commercial fishing.Ninety percent of the 833 Evening Sun readers and other callers yesterday to SUNDIAL thought that rockfish should be protected from commercial fishing. Ten percent, or 83 callers thought that rockfish should not be protected."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
March 12, 1991
The Maryland legislature will debate whether rockfish should be protected from commercial fishing.The Evening Sun would like to know how you feel about the banning of commercial fishing for rockfish, or striped bass.Please call SUNDIAL, The Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a touch-tone phone. The call is free and answers will be registered between 10 a.m. and midnight. The SUNDIAL phone number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736. When you reach SUNDIAL, enter category 4600 and wait for instructions.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Marine scientists are mystified by an apparent spate of deaths among harbor porpoises, with the gregarious mammals' carcasses turning up in record numbers along East Coast beaches, including Maryland's.Through mid-April, at least 162 of the small, coast-hugging porpoises were washed ashore, dead or dying, between their wintering spots in North Carolina and their summer grounds in Maine. The number of reported deaths is more than triple last year's 51, and well above the previous record of 103 harbor porpoise deaths reported in 1977.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | October 28, 1990
The rockfish pot continues to bubble.What happened to this year's rockfish season? The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) gave some preliminary data last Monday evening that might help you understand, assuming you agree with the DNR's data.DNR officials say that, based on their best estimate, 180,000 recreational fishermen went fishing during the first three days of the season. The DNR estimates that one out of three anglers caught fish during this three-day period and 172,000 pounds of fish were caught.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Maryland chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association is calling on the state to more efficiently manage the costs of commercial fisheries. Under the current structure, only 20 percent of the cost for managing the activities of commercial fisheries comes from license and permit fees, compared to 93 percent of the cost for managing recreational fishing. While federal grants account for another 23 percent of the cost of managing commercial fishing, it means that up to 57 percent comes from Maryland taxpayers.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
Natural Resources Police seized nearly 3 tons of striped bass Sunday from a trawler and charged a Dorchester County seafood processor with illegal commercial fishing in Maryland waters. It was the second time in less than a week that officers had charged Jack C. Colbourne, owner of Colbourne Seafood Inc. in Secretary, with illegal fishing. Officers boarded the Mount Vernon after watching the 80-foot vessel drag a net about two miles off the Ocean City inlet all day Sunday, according to Sgt. Ken Turner, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Larry Simns | April 7, 2011
Over the past decade, Maryland's commercial watermen, our families and communities have slowly but steadily been reaching a turning point in our lives. With a polluted Chesapeake Bay, uncertain seafood stocks, rising costs of doing business and unpredictable fisheries management, commercial watermen around the state are facing a critical choice about the future. We can choose to follow the path we are on, filled with instability and insecurity, or we can choose a road of sustainability and promise.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candus.thomson@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
Fisheries regulators who oversee Maryland's annual striped bass quota should delay any punishment until the conclusion of a state and federal undercover sting operation that broke up a major commercial black market, state natural resources officials said. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission begins its winter meeting today in Alexandria, Va., and the first item on the agenda is a discussion of the status of striped bass along the Eastern Seaboard. Traditionally, commission members have been quick to punish Maryland for infractions, most recently slashing the recreational allocation to compensate for overfishing.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
Natural Resources Police seized nearly 3 tons of striped bass Sunday from a trawler and charged a Dorchester County seafood processor with illegal commercial fishing in Maryland waters. It was the second time in less than a week that officers had charged Jack C. Colbourne, owner of Colbourne Seafood Inc. in Secretary, with illegal fishing. Officers boarded the Mount Vernon after watching the 80-foot vessel drag a net about two miles off the Ocean City inlet all day Sunday, according to Sgt. Ken Turner, a police spokesman.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
With the regulatory clock ticking toward midnight, Maryland fisheries officials are scrambling to get recreational anglers and commercial watermen to agree on new rules to cover yellow perch fishing. Department of Natural Resources officials will meet July 28 with recreational anglers to find out what they would like to see for rules covering season length, size and daily creel limit, said Tom O'Connell, fisheries service director. The agency met with commercial netters this month. Once both sides have been polled, O'Connell said his staff will develop a management plan that satisfies a bill passed by the General Assembly last year to protect yellow perch while giving recreational anglers a bigger share of the catch.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 9, 2007
You really can't go wrong this month if you say, "I'll have the fish, please." Out on the water, stripers and blues are schooling up for their annual fall dance. On terra firma, the calendar is filling with the dates of meetings and hearings to talk about finned critters. With time running out, the Department of Natural Resources is moving quickly to draft a yellow perch management plan that would take effect Jan. 1. A group of stakeholders met Aug. 22 to review proposals that would help yellow perch migrate up rivers and streams to their historical spawning areas and provide a formula for divvying up the harvest between recreational and commercial fishermen.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
The End of the Line Charles Clover The New Press / 384 pages / $26.95 As Atlantic cod were being fished nearly to extinction on the Grand Banks during the 1980s, Canadian fishery scientists convinced their government not to stop the industry. Fishermen shouldn't face strict catch limits, the biologists argued, because a smaller population of adult cod would reproduce more fruitfully than a large one. The researchers claimed that fishing had little impact on fish populations and that water temperatures and other factors were far more important.
NEWS
By Bill Burton and Bill Burton,Evening Sun Staff | March 12, 1991
Chanting "No more nets" and "Save our rockfish," 750 chilly sport fishermen marched on the State House in Annapolis last night in support of legislation to protect rockfish from commercial fishing.The turnout was several hundred less than predicted, but cold weather and brisk winds kept many from making the one-mile walk from Navy Stadium to the steps of the State House.The demonstration, organized by the 7,000-member Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association, was aimed at convincing legislators there is broad support for SB 575, which would grant game fish status to rockfish, or striped bass.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bevan-Dangel | August 31, 2006
Lately, most of the news from Washington has been dominated by partisan fights and acrimony. However, there is one issue receiving bipartisan support - the fate of America's oceans. The Senate recently approved the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act by unanimous consent. This development comes not a moment too soon. Destructive practices by the commercial fishing industry are depleting fish populations and devastating key ocean habitat. Equipped with high-tech fleets, fishing industry conglomerates have become so voracious that some fish populations have disappeared within just a few years.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bevan-Dangel | August 31, 2006
Lately, most of the news from Washington has been dominated by partisan fights and acrimony. However, there is one issue receiving bipartisan support - the fate of America's oceans. The Senate recently approved the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act by unanimous consent. This development comes not a moment too soon. Destructive practices by the commercial fishing industry are depleting fish populations and devastating key ocean habitat. Equipped with high-tech fleets, fishing industry conglomerates have become so voracious that some fish populations have disappeared within just a few years.
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
The Ehrlich administration is dropping its proposal to end a 17-year moratorium on the commercial fishing of yellow perch in two Eastern Shore rivers. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources had proposed opening the Choptank and Nanticoke to commercial yellow perch fishing this spring. But after an outcry from environmentalists and recreational anglers, who said the measure would further imperil a scarce resource, department officials changed their minds. "We are withdrawing that entire package," said DNR assistant secretary Mike Slattery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.