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NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff writer | February 9, 1992
Supporters of a bill to create a district management authority for the promotion of downtown businesses, which was withdrawn by the Bel Air town commissioners, say the measure must be reconsidered.A condition that the state Department of Housing and Community Developmentimposed for a $15,000 grant was that the town's commissioners must vote on creation of the commercial district."As we understand it, that is one of the conditions," said Elizabeth Carven, the town's community development administrator.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 14, 2013
It sounded like a Baltimore-themed idea that made sense. To celebrate a century of screen painting, 100 new, colorful window screens would be installed along the commercial district of Highlandtown, in the very heart of the neighborhoods where this summertime tradition flourished. Why not? Despite our dependence on air conditioners, people still open their windows in this Baltimore neighborhood - and there are in fact hundreds of window screens along Eastern Avenue. Because this remains a commercial street full of traditional small businesses, there are not so many ground-floor screens.
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NEWS
December 1, 1991
If the town of Bel Air hires someone to improve business in the town's commercial district, it may cost businesses between $100 to $500 each a year.Liz Carven, community development administrator, said that after interviews with town business owners about a "manager" formarketing town businesses, the following fee structure has been proposed to support the post:* Businesses with 1-25 employees -- $100 a year* Businesses with 26 employees or more -- $250...
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Havre de Grace Main Street has been accredited as a 2008 National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by the National Trust Main Street Center, officials said. The national center works in partnership with Coordinating Main Street Programs nationwide to identify local programs that meet 10 basic performance standards. Standards include developing a mission, fostering strong public-private partnerships, securing an operating budget, tracking economic progress and preserving historic buildings.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM and PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | March 6, 2006
In East Baltimore, the Chapel NDP Apartments, 173 units of low-income housing near the Johns Hopkins medical complex, are being torn down to make way for upscale housing and a commercial district. Over the past few decades, many people called Chapel Apartments home, celebrating birthdays, graduations and weddings, while drugs and crime became a problem in the area in recent years. As the demolition of the complex neared, some residents resisted their impending eviction. The new $80 million development project will include townhouses, apartments, shops and offices.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Havre de Grace Main Street has been accredited as a 2008 National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by the National Trust Main Street Center, officials said. The national center works in partnership with Coordinating Main Street Programs nationwide to identify local programs that meet 10 basic performance standards. Standards include developing a mission, fostering strong public-private partnerships, securing an operating budget, tracking economic progress and preserving historic buildings.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
In last week's edition of the Harford County Sun, a Bel Air businessowned by Jim Carrozza was improperly identified. The correct name ofthe shop is The Strawberry Basket. The Harford County Sun regrets the error.In an effort to sustain a healthy commercial district in Bel Air, the town's commissioners will be holding a hearing tomorrow to consider a proposal creating a commercial district management authority.The authority would have a budget of between $50,000 and $60,000 to finance promotions and marketing activities for businesses locatedin the center of town.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
THE ISSUE: The Anne Arundel County Council voted, 5-2, last week to give permission to the owner of Laurel Park, Canada-based Magna Entertainment Corp., to create a commercial district that would accommodate a retail enclave at the thoroughbred racetrack. Magna has proposed creating a multimillion-dollar redevelopment at Laurel, which could include shops, restaurants and a hotel, to keep the track economically viable. Magna officials said the project is conceptual and is likely years away from completion, but the pace of the redevelopment would greatly quicken if slots were legalized in Maryland.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
A group of downtown business leaders won preliminary approval from the City Council yesterday to borrow money from private sources to pay for major public improvements in the commercial district.The Downtown Management District will be allowed to incur long-term debt to pay for sidewalks, curbs, landscaping, lighting and signs. Created in 1992 to levy a special business tax, the management district will be limited to a debt service of no more than 10 percent of its projected revenues each year.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
Designated this week as Baltimore's eighth Main Streets community, the neighborhood of Highlandtown can look forward to an infusion of public funds and business expertise aimed at stimulating its commercial district. The grant, announced Monday, includes $351,000 in cash and technical services over the next five years. Highlandtown joins seven Baltimore neighborhoods named to the program over the past three years: Waverly, Hampden, Federal Hill, Belair-Edison, Pigtown/Washington Village, Pennsylvania Avenue and East Monument Street.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM and PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | March 6, 2006
In East Baltimore, the Chapel NDP Apartments, 173 units of low-income housing near the Johns Hopkins medical complex, are being torn down to make way for upscale housing and a commercial district. Over the past few decades, many people called Chapel Apartments home, celebrating birthdays, graduations and weddings, while drugs and crime became a problem in the area in recent years. As the demolition of the complex neared, some residents resisted their impending eviction. The new $80 million development project will include townhouses, apartments, shops and offices.
NEWS
January 29, 2006
THE ISSUE: -- The Anne Arundel County Council voted 5-2 last week to give permission to the owner of Laurel Park, Canada-based Magna Entertainment Corp., to create a commercial district that would accommodate a retail enclave at the thoroughbred racetrack. Magna has proposed creating a multimillion-dollar redevelopment at Laurel, which could include shops, restaurants and a hotel, to keep the track economically viable. Magna officials said the project is conceptual and is likely years away from completion, but the pace of the redevelopment would greatly quicken if slots were legalized in Maryland.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
THE ISSUE: The Anne Arundel County Council voted, 5-2, last week to give permission to the owner of Laurel Park, Canada-based Magna Entertainment Corp., to create a commercial district that would accommodate a retail enclave at the thoroughbred racetrack. Magna has proposed creating a multimillion-dollar redevelopment at Laurel, which could include shops, restaurants and a hotel, to keep the track economically viable. Magna officials said the project is conceptual and is likely years away from completion, but the pace of the redevelopment would greatly quicken if slots were legalized in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
As the Board of Estimates approved plans yesterday to bring constantly monitored surveillance cameras to three of Baltimore's violent crime areas, officials moved ahead with another initiative to bring more cameras to city streets. City officials hope the cameras will expand the reach of the city's police force. Mayor Martin O'Malley likes to call the cameras "force multipliers." "It has been a constant source of frustration all these years," the mayor said yesterday before the Board of Estimates meeting.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
In a boost to Baltimore County's redevelopment efforts, three banks have joined the county to provide reduced-interest loans to small businesses in commercial revitalization districts, County Executive James T. Smith Jr. announced yesterday. M&T Bank, Provident Bank and Susquehanna Bank agreed to offer 1/4 -point discounts to businesses located in or moving to the county's 13 revitalization districts, which are concentrated in the older communities around the Beltway. The program is called "Revitalization Advantage."
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
Designated this week as Baltimore's eighth Main Streets community, the neighborhood of Highlandtown can look forward to an infusion of public funds and business expertise aimed at stimulating its commercial district. The grant, announced Monday, includes $351,000 in cash and technical services over the next five years. Highlandtown joins seven Baltimore neighborhoods named to the program over the past three years: Waverly, Hampden, Federal Hill, Belair-Edison, Pigtown/Washington Village, Pennsylvania Avenue and East Monument Street.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1997
Highlandtown merchants say legislation meant to attract entrepreneurs to the area could bring new life -- from small specialty shops to grand restaurants known for their ethnic delights -- to a commercial district in need of revitalization.Under a measure expected to come before the city planning commission June 12, Highlandtown shop owners would be required to update their facades and renovate their properties. The legislation also calls for improved management of the area and a more centralized commercial district.
NEWS
July 22, 2003
Redevelopment brings Pigtown reason to cheer Despite residents' misgivings about the economic impact of Montgomery Park, there is reason to celebrate ("Montgomery Park at 40%," July 15). The remarkable $100 million conversion of the former department store and warehouse building into office space has been stimulating residential and commercial activity in Pigtown. Data demonstrate that over the past two years, the neighborhood's population has stabilized, median household income has increased 5.5 percent and the neighborhood's unemployment rate has decreased by 6 percent.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2003
Economic times are tough, but Mohammad Sheraz decided to go ahead and renovate his Pakistani grocery store anyway. Customers at Halal Meat and Spices, in a U.S. 40 strip mall in Catonsville, will find a new ceiling, lights, paint, floor and air conditioning. Now Sheraz would like to fix up the outside of his business. And Baltimore County may be able to help. On Monday night, the County Council is expected to designate the stretch of U.S. 40, also known as Baltimore National Pike, from the Baltimore City line west to Rolling Road as a "commercial revitalization district."
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