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NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
In a rare consensus on a single issue, Columbia's village boards have united against a proposal by the Rouse Co. to construct commercial buildings around Merriweather Post Pavilion. All but one of the 10 village boards sent letters emphatically denouncing the development plan to the Howard County Planning Board, which is expected to vote on the proposal tonight. "We agree for a change," said Lee Richardson, chairman of the Town Center Village Board. "The 10 villages have a tendency to go off in 11 directions at least, but this seemed like such an important issue.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Harold H. Hogg, founder of a Central Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania commercial construction company who endowed the Hogg Family Chair at Duke University, his alma mater, died June 3 of leukemia at the Moorings Park retirement community in Naples, Fla. The former York, Pa., resident was 86. The son of Dr. William L. Hogg, a United Methodist minister, and Mildred R. Hogg, a Latin teacher, Harold Hubert Hogg was born and raised in Leechburg, Pa....
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
The Carroll County commissioners moved yesterday toward freezing a significant portion of the county's residential and commercial growth for up to a year, hoping to toughen existing restrictions on housing developments while reserving land for new industry. The proposals, which drew immediate opposition from developers and property rights advocates, represent the most drastic steps the commissioners have taken to follow through on promises to slow growth since their terms began late last year.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
Once again, Baltimore County with help from the Dundalk Renaissance Corporation is attempting to take advantage of the Dundalk area. In a very clandestine move, the county administration sold the North Point Government Center for $2.1 million even though it was appraised for $8.75 million. It was sold under the disguise that the building was "falling down. " North Point was built in the mid-1950s unlike many of the schools in the area which were built in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s and are still functioning well as schools and as various other facilities.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
South Carroll residents are asking the County Commissioners to curtail commercial development near the severely congested intersection of Routes 26 and 32.More than 70 people met with county officials Thursday to protest a proposed retail center and 14-screen theater complex at Londontown Boulevard and Route 32, about a quarter-mile from the intersection, often rated as the county's worst crossroads.They asked the commissioners to do whatever they can to prevent the development at the industrial-zoned site.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
Elected on promises to slow growth, the Carroll commissioners took a first step toward doing just that yesterday by imposing freezes on significant portions of residential and commercial development in the Baltimore metropolitan area's fastest-growing county. The measures are the most stringent growth controls applied in Carroll in the past five years, and among the toughest ever enacted in the county. The two unanimous votes to approve the limits appeared to stun developers, who had expected the commissioners to approve more moderate measures that would not have halted projects already in the pipeline toward gaining approval.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
The Westminster Common Council is expected to adopt the city's first comprehensive plan in 13 years during its meeting tonight at City Hall.The plan, developed during the past year by city planners and a six-member Citizens Advisory Committee, calls for rezoning several properties. Rezoning the 130-acre Koontz farm, on the city's west side, sparked the most controversy.After two work sessions, the council gave preliminary approval for commercial development at that site across from Western Maryland College on Route 140.The council's decision, on a 3-1 vote, makes possible zoning changes that would allow development of a 17-acre commercial center and construction of homes with quarter-acre lots on about 50 acres.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1999
Considered the gateway from Washington to south Anne Arundel County by many, Waysons Corner has the potential to become a collection of tradesmen and small retailers, a marketplace of unique shops, or a shopping center with a large-scale grocery store.Or, maybe, a combination of all.People seem to have different visions for the intersection of Routes 408 and 4, a mixed commercial and residential area near the Prince George's County line.Plans have been presented, suggestions have been made and rumors are floating, but one thing is certain: More commercial development is coming to Waysons Corner.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1997
As the 116th Maryland State Fair continues this week, the compact community of West Timonium Heights is keeping a wary eye on the fairgrounds, its next-door neighbor since the 1920s.Hal Bressler, who raised seven children with his wife, Adele, at their Rose Street bungalow, is among the residents who complain about the annual onslaught of noise, crowds and traffic. "I hate it. People block the intersection. You can't get out on York Road."This year, residents have more serious worries. They're fighting for the neighborhood's survival as commercial development in the busy corridor presses in around them.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Eldersburg resident Carolyn Fairbank, who appeared to have left the stage late last year as South Carroll's most vocal community activist, has returned singing an old standard.Her repertoire ranges from the incorporation of Eldersburg and working to change Carroll to a county executive-county council form of government. But it is her theme song of opposing residential and commercial development in the county's fastest-growing region that she sings loudest and best.Fairbank belted it out again last month after reading about a developer's plans to seek a zoning change to build a theater complex and several restaurants on an Eldersburg site near the most congested intersection in the county.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
On paper, the plan for a car maintenance shop and a few stores on Snowden River Parkway in Columbia hardly seems worth fighting about. The business people opposing it, however, see it as an illegal first step toward drastic changes for the worse along some major roads, and a potential threat to businesses in Columbia's nine village centers.  "We just feel it was an illegal rezoning," says Christopher Alleva, president of the Howard County Independent...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
In a city struggling to rebuild its population, construction cranes would seem to be a welcome sign. But office, shopping and housing projects in the works in Northwest Baltimore have some residents worried about the impact of development on a degraded stream that flows through their neighborhoods on its way to the harbor. Cranes tower over an 11-acre tract on Wabash Avenue, where the Social Security Administration plans to move 1,600 workers from the federal agency's aging downtown headquarters.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
The Harford County Council is poised to attempt action to ease development restrictions imposed by the Maryland General Assembly in the 2012 session. In short, the restrictions apply to areas outside Harford County's official development area. That area, known as the Development Envelope, is served by public water lines and sanitary sewer service, making it most suitable for large scale residential and commercial development. The affected area, even on county planning documents, is largely rural.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 1, 2012
Walmart should rethink its plans to move from Abingdon to a site closer to Bel Air off of Route 924 and Plumtree Road, Harford County Executive David Craig said Tuesday. "I have serious concerns regarding the proposed construction of a Walmart at the site discussed," Craig said in a written statement issued by his office early Tuesday afternoon. The statement comes 12 days after several hundred angry people attended a community input meeting on the plan for the Walmart, at which many of them shouted at Walmart representatives and denounced Craig and other county officials, many under the belief they were supporting the project.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 24, 2012
The addition of 69 new houses to the area in Fallston bounded by Routes 1, 152 and 147 is lately drawing fire from a community irritated by an existing problem with traffic, but there's no good reason at this late date in the process for the Harford County government to do anything to stop the proposed development. As a practical matter, the addition of that many houses is going to have a relatively minimal impact on an already congested area. The reason the area is a problem now isn't because someone is proposing a few houses that will be the straws that break the camel's back.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 2, 2012
Harford County officials may have been reluctant to talk about a Wal-Martcoming to the Emmorton area south of Bel Air when the subject first came up more than a year ago, but the developer of the site off Route 924 and Plumtree Road is moving forward with the project regardless. Legal notices were published in The Aegis last week announcing a community input meeting "for a proposedWal-Mart and other commercial uses" on 33.7 acres on the southwest side of the intersection of Route 924 and Plumtree Road.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
The county Planning and Zoning Commission, which has become noted for its spats as much as for its planning in the past year, may be in for another fight.While recent quarrels have centered on residential development, the storm on the horizon concerns oversight of industrial and commercial development. Commission member Grant S. Dannelly says he wants the planning panel to begin reviewing industrial and commercial site plans, just as it now does with residential projects. "The citizenry needs to know what's coming," he said.
NEWS
January 14, 1998
An article in yesterday's Maryland section incorrectly reported the amount of state financial support for the expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center and the process by which Harborplace was developed. In fact, the state gave $100 million rTC to enlarge the convention center, and a referendum was held in 1978 to determine whether to leave land at the Inner Harbor as open space or lease it for commercial development.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/14/98
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Peyton Skipwith Cochran Jr., a longtime Rouse Co. executive who helped develop shopping centers but was deeply interested in land preservation, died Thursday at Springwell Senior Living in Baltimore from complications of Alzheimer's and a stroke. He was 85. In addition to helping start two local groups that reflected his interest in the outdoors, Mr. Cochran — known as Skip — was active in fox hunting and steeplechasing. He was a partner in Arcadia Stable, owner of Buck Jakes, a horse that twice won the Maryland Hunt Cup and died at age 24 in January.
EXPLORE
January 27, 2012
Thirteen parcels are identified and several are considered "ripe for development" in the new Hickory Ridge plan. In the early 1990s, CA proposed an ill-conceived plan for a Fun Center on the three-acre parcel adjacent to Giant that included night lighting and batting cages. The plan was overwhelming rejected by the homeowners nearby. In the late 2000s, another surprise awaited Clemens and Hickory Crest homeowners. A Walgreens was proposed at the corner of Freetown Road and Cedar Lane.
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