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By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 4, 2007
Jim Butcher was servicing an F-4 jet when a colonel approached him in the hangar. "I thought I'd done something wrong," Butcher said of the visit by Col. Raymond Henri in 1967. "But Colonel Henri had found out that I had art training, and he asked me if I was interested in being an artist for the military." Butcher accepted the colonel's offer and joined the Marine Corps Combat Art program, which began during World War I with battlefield sketches. The combat art program was the first of a progression of artistic endeavors for Butcher, 62, including commercial art, montages, portraits, maritime and landscape art. Spanning more than four decades, Butcher's career illustrates the twists, turns and setbacks an artist can encounter.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 20, 2012
Art has an uneasy relationship with the world of commercial enterprise. Commercial artists aren't necessarily held in high regard as they're often charged with tasks like devising nondescript images to hang in the food consumption areas of fast food joints. Then again, Andy Warhol, whose reputation has remained solid long after his death, was a commercial artist of sorts; his rather high volume studio was famously known as "The Factory. " Others, however, have maintained great art must be associated with great suffering, often the kind of suffering that comes from being a starving artist.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Howard County has never been a hot spot for upscale commercial art galleries. Far away from the tony art salons found on Baltimore's Charles Street and Dupont Circle in Washington, Howard's few galleries have survived over the years because of their owners' practicality, determination and entrepreneurial grit. In Howard County, "you don't have that level of sophistication that you find in the city," says Rebecca Weber, owner of the 20-year-old Shepard Art Gallery on Ellicott City's historic Main Street.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 4, 2007
Jim Butcher was servicing an F-4 jet when a colonel approached him in the hangar. "I thought I'd done something wrong," Butcher said of the visit by Col. Raymond Henri in 1967. "But Colonel Henri had found out that I had art training, and he asked me if I was interested in being an artist for the military." Butcher accepted the colonel's offer and joined the Marine Corps Combat Art program, which began during World War I with battlefield sketches. The combat art program was the first of a progression of artistic endeavors for Butcher, 62, including commercial art, montages, portraits, maritime and landscape art. Spanning more than four decades, Butcher's career illustrates the twists, turns and setbacks an artist can encounter.
NEWS
By Bennard B. Perlman | March 26, 1997
A HALF-CENTURY ago when Abstract Expressionism captivated the art world, it was estimated that only 10 percent of the public understood and appreciated it. Then along came Pop Art, which replaced the drips, dribbles and brazen bravura with carefully painted comic strips and dollar bills and sculptures of hamburgers.Pop became immediately popular with the public because its subject matter was recognizable. It was at once anti-elitist and non-intellectual. As Andy Warhol put it, ''Pop Art is for everyone.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 20, 2012
Art has an uneasy relationship with the world of commercial enterprise. Commercial artists aren't necessarily held in high regard as they're often charged with tasks like devising nondescript images to hang in the food consumption areas of fast food joints. Then again, Andy Warhol, whose reputation has remained solid long after his death, was a commercial artist of sorts; his rather high volume studio was famously known as "The Factory. " Others, however, have maintained great art must be associated with great suffering, often the kind of suffering that comes from being a starving artist.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun staff | April 26, 1998
The cinema today is in a crisis. Brave the local multiplex. The 30,000 movie screens currently aglow in America have been colonized by over-budgeted spectacles, treacly melodramas, feel-good smarmedies, middling vehicles for superannuated action heroes.Themes, faces and soundtracks vary, but they all share essential qualities: disposability, middlebrow contempt for intellect and the pots of money spent to make and incessantly hype them. "Titanic" ($200 million to make, $40 million to market)
NEWS
July 6, 2007
Frederick William Smith, a retired commercial photographer whose career at The Baltimore Sun spanned more than four decades, died Tuesday of multiple organ failure at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 94. Mr. Smith, born and raised in East Baltimore, attended city public schools. He began his career in 1937 as a copy boy in the commercial art department at The Sun's old Sun Square Building at Baltimore and Charles streets. An interest in photography eventually resulted in his being promoted to photographer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Richard C. "Dick" D'Agostino, former Baltimore Sun design director who later worked for Fujitsu Consulting in New York City, died Monday of heart failure at his Roland Park home. He was 64. Richard Compton D'Agostino, whose father had been manager of the old Alcazar Hotel and whose mother was a registered nurse, was born and raised in Pikesville. Mr. D'Agostino, who had planned to become a priest, was a 1966 graduate of St. Albert's Junior Seminary in Middletown, N.Y. In 1970, he earned a degree in philosophy from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 4, 2004
Art of the Japanese Postcard: Masterpieces from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection. MFA Publications. 288 pages with 370 illustrations, 350 in color. $45. This is the enchanting catalog of an exhibition of the enormous Lauder collection, presented by Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, which will be on display through June 10. The cards were made between 1880 and 1940, from work by graphic designers and contemporary artists -- a rich popular commercial art...
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Howard County has never been a hot spot for upscale commercial art galleries. Far away from the tony art salons found on Baltimore's Charles Street and Dupont Circle in Washington, Howard's few galleries have survived over the years because of their owners' practicality, determination and entrepreneurial grit. In Howard County, "you don't have that level of sophistication that you find in the city," says Rebecca Weber, owner of the 20-year-old Shepard Art Gallery on Ellicott City's historic Main Street.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun staff | April 26, 1998
The cinema today is in a crisis. Brave the local multiplex. The 30,000 movie screens currently aglow in America have been colonized by over-budgeted spectacles, treacly melodramas, feel-good smarmedies, middling vehicles for superannuated action heroes.Themes, faces and soundtracks vary, but they all share essential qualities: disposability, middlebrow contempt for intellect and the pots of money spent to make and incessantly hype them. "Titanic" ($200 million to make, $40 million to market)
NEWS
By Bennard B. Perlman | March 26, 1997
A HALF-CENTURY ago when Abstract Expressionism captivated the art world, it was estimated that only 10 percent of the public understood and appreciated it. Then along came Pop Art, which replaced the drips, dribbles and brazen bravura with carefully painted comic strips and dollar bills and sculptures of hamburgers.Pop became immediately popular with the public because its subject matter was recognizable. It was at once anti-elitist and non-intellectual. As Andy Warhol put it, ''Pop Art is for everyone.
NEWS
April 1, 1992
Howard School of Technology students won six first-place awards, four second-place honors and three third-place awards in the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America statewide skill olympics last weekend.First-place winners become eligible to compete at VICA's national convention in Louisville, Ky., in June. Howard cosmetology student Christy Dexter will also go to the national event as one of five voting delegates chosen by Maryland students to represent them at the convention.Chip Harris, state VICA director, said he was pleased that the awards this year "were spread out across the state."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | January 6, 1993
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, one of Baltimore's leadin commercial art galleries, will move from its present location at 1006 Morton St. to downtown Charles Street in March.Gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis said yesterday that his new space would be on Charles Street but that he couldn't confirm an exact location because negotiations were continuing.The Mitchell Baker Galerie will be vacating Grimaldis' former site at 523 N. Charles St. at the end of January, and there is speculation that Grimaldis would move there.
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