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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
Baltimore County's leaders want to offer a tax carrot to business owners in older commercial areas but don't want them to gobble a big hole in the county treasury in the process.The issue illustrates the difficulty of dealing with two of the county's biggest problems, a slowing of tax revenue growth and growing urban decay. The bill under consideration by the County Council is an attempt to walk a tightrope between the two.The idea is to offer business owners who improve their properties temporary immunity from higher property taxes that would result from the work.
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By Kathy Hudson | September 12, 2011
We were at the beach over the weekend. The well-tended gardens and containers at Bethany Beach shone brilliantly with color. What a difference they make to visitors coming into the commercial district. Every year the median of Garfield Parkway is meticulously planted with annuals. We've watched the woman who designs the area plant in spring. This weekend I wished I'd seen her to congratulate her on this year's color combinations and plant selections.   I'd also be curious to know about the partnership between Bethany Beach and Périers, France mentioned on a nearby sign.
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NEWS
By Rachel D. Mansour and Rachel D. Mansour,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 19, 1999
Annapolis transit officials have announced an extension of Gold Route bus service to the busy commercial areas -- and job sites -- of Gateway Village, Annapolis Harbour Center and the Admiral Cochrane Drive corridor.Beginning tomorrow, the Gold Route extension begins daily bus service, creating an hourlong circuit linking downtown Annapolis with Parole town center and its big-box retailers and other developments.The new service will run from 5: 30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and connect on the hour with the Spa Road bus transfer point.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 11, 2008
It was a pricey weekend for Richard Coston. He parked his truck cab in Northwest Baltimore on Friday night and the next day discovered that it was missing. "I knew it had been towed," he said. Coston went to the city impound lot on Pulaski Highway yesterday, resigned to shelling out $752 to get his property back. "They didn't even give a warning," he said. "They just came, and it was gone. There are no `no parking' signs there. They just came and took it." The cab was one of 38 commercial vehicles towed over the weekend in a citywide sweep to crack down on illegally parked trucks.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
GERTRUDE STEIN'S saying about Oakland, Calif. -- "There is no there there" -- unfortunately applies to too many old Maryland towns that have seen their commercial centers atrophy.Glen Burnie, in an attempt to re-create a sense of place, is planning to build a 30-foot-wide arch at Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard and Ritchie Highway. Proponents don't pretend that their modest structure will rival Paris' famed Arc de Triomphe or St. Louis' soaring Gateway Arch. All they seek is a focal point for redevelopment of the town center.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2005
Veli Demirel wants to build a "nice pretty building" to house his hair salon and some offices in place of three houses he owns along Frederick Road near U.S. 40, at the edge of a neatly kept residential community in western Ellicott City. A few blocks west, at Coventry Court Drive, another absentee owner also wants to redevelop several single-family homes near the highway. "This entire area is inappropriate for residential use," Vince Guida, Demirel's lawyer, told the Howard County Council at a zoning hearing last week.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
After some small tinkering last night, the County Council appears poised to pass a bill intended to boost revitalization efforts in several blighted commercial areas. Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle's proposal would allow vacant buildings to be transformed into self-storage facilities - as long as they meet guidelines, including clauses that would prohibit outside doors and restrict the expansion of storage space beyond existing buildings. Her proposal also would allow mixed commercial and residential development on properties within 15 designated revitalization areas, which are mostly in northern Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1996
Key provisions of a proposal to ease restrictions on roadside vendors may be challenged tonight by several Anne Arundel County Council members.Two members said yesterday that they want to eliminate a proposal that would allow vendors in areas zoned for offices and strip shopping centers. And another is thinking of adding a provision that would require a review after two years to ensure the law is working.James "Ed" DeGrange, a Glen Burnie Democrat, and Council President Diane R. Evans, an Arnold Republican, said it is sensible to allow farmers to sell produce from roadside stands in agricultural districts, but not to allow vendors to operate in all commercial areas.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
The Baltimore County Council unanimously approved last night a little-heralded bill that is viewed as vitally important to the preservation of the county's older, urbanized commercial areas.The measure, a commercial Planned Unit Development (PUD) law, will allow redevelopment of many commercial areas without the long, expensive rezoning process that occurs only once every four years.For example, an investor wanting to build a restaurant on land zoned for light industry where an abandoned gas station sits can do it without getting a zoning change.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg j | June 29, 1991
Baltimore residents, plagued by high crime and high tax rates, are used to seeing red. But on Tuesday they will begin to see some blue.That's when the Police Department will put 50 additional uniformed officers on the street in areas determined by computer analysis to have a need for such old-time policing, the department announced yesterday.Said spokesman Dennis S. Hill, "We realize in the summertime it stays light longer and more things are going on. We have isolated the problem areas and want to beef up foot patrols in those areas that need it. This is a fairly substantial contribution of people."
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Stacey Macklin said she is used to seeing police cars on the street in front of her Linthicum home. So when two men were fatally shot Saturday afternoon about 20 yards from her backyard, she was not surprised. Macklin, who has lived in the area for four years, said the brazen double homicide has made her think about moving. "Ask me why I'm here, I don't know," said Macklin, 39, a hairdresser. "I want to build a wall up as high as possible around my house. Maybe then I'd feel safe." Anne Arundel County police said yesterday that they have no leads or suspects in the shootings of the men, Rodreco Deonta Murray, 27, of Glen Burnie and Lawrence Jerome Forrester, 29, of no fixed address.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2005
Veli Demirel wants to build a "nice pretty building" to house his hair salon and some offices in place of three houses he owns along Frederick Road near U.S. 40, at the edge of a neatly kept residential community in western Ellicott City. A few blocks west, at Coventry Court Drive, another absentee owner also wants to redevelop several single-family homes near the highway. "This entire area is inappropriate for residential use," Vince Guida, Demirel's lawyer, told the Howard County Council at a zoning hearing last week.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2004
Members of the task force charged with developing a plan for the future of U.S. 40 - Ellicott City's commercial-commuter boulevard - have proposed four mixed-use centers between Turf Valley and the Baltimore County line. Like plans to revitalize U.S. 1, the U.S. 40 Enhancement Study - focusing on land use, appearance and transportation - is part of Howard County's effort to guide growth and redevelopment in its more urban eastern half. The group will present its ideas at a public workshop June 15, then refine its plan based on comments, said Steven M. Johns, the county planner coordinating the study.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
After some small tinkering last night, the County Council appears poised to pass a bill intended to boost revitalization efforts in several blighted commercial areas. Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle's proposal would allow vacant buildings to be transformed into self-storage facilities - as long as they meet guidelines, including clauses that would prohibit outside doors and restrict the expansion of storage space beyond existing buildings. Her proposal also would allow mixed commercial and residential development on properties within 15 designated revitalization areas, which are mostly in northern Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
The Howard County Zoning Board wants fewer homes and more employment areas in the Maple Lawn Farms mixed-use development in Fulton, but builder Stewart J. Greenebaum refuses to consider the proposal. In a two-paragraph letter sent to the board this week, Richard B. Talkin, an attorney for Greenebaum, said he "cannot adopt" the "substantial" changes to the development plan directed by three of the five board members. The move appears to frustrate the desire of some board members for more public hearings on their alternative, lower-density plan.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
First, the Digital Harbor. Now the Digital Valley? That's one of the visions suggested yesterday for Baltimore's Jones Falls Valley during a five-hour brainstorming session held to generate ideas to rejuvenate the corridor. Imagine, planners said, a bustling corridor where old mill buildings are filled to the brim with high-tech entrepreneurs working on e-commerce projects that will revolutionize the industry. Or maybe a tourism and recreational zone where people travel by light rail, bike and even canoe to art galleries, crafts shops and museums along the way. Or new houses and apartments, rising on reclaimed landfills and industrial sites.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 11, 2008
It was a pricey weekend for Richard Coston. He parked his truck cab in Northwest Baltimore on Friday night and the next day discovered that it was missing. "I knew it had been towed," he said. Coston went to the city impound lot on Pulaski Highway yesterday, resigned to shelling out $752 to get his property back. "They didn't even give a warning," he said. "They just came, and it was gone. There are no `no parking' signs there. They just came and took it." The cab was one of 38 commercial vehicles towed over the weekend in a citywide sweep to crack down on illegally parked trucks.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 20, 1995
Sid Mandel's Deli is gone now, the french fries and gravy momentarily replaced by dust and rubble that workmen are converting to a hair salon. The old Food Fair has become a Super Pride with a poster out front that says it honors a government food program. Read's Drug Store is now a Rite-Aid with a security camera inside the front door.This is Woodmoor Shopping Center on Liberty Road in northwest Baltimore County after its much-trumpeted and long-overdue face lift designed to change a whole community's perception of itself.
NEWS
By Rachel D. Mansour and Rachel D. Mansour,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 19, 1999
Annapolis transit officials have announced an extension of Gold Route bus service to the busy commercial areas -- and job sites -- of Gateway Village, Annapolis Harbour Center and the Admiral Cochrane Drive corridor.Beginning tomorrow, the Gold Route extension begins daily bus service, creating an hourlong circuit linking downtown Annapolis with Parole town center and its big-box retailers and other developments.The new service will run from 5: 30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and connect on the hour with the Spa Road bus transfer point.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
The Westminster Planning and Zoning Commission voted last night to limit the size of stores in neighborhood commercial zones to no more than 25,000 square feet each -- about the size of the Staples store in Cranberry Square.Neighborhood commercial zones are aimed at drawing aesthetically pleasing village-style shops with concealed trash bins and pitched roofs.Town Planner Katrina Tucker recommended a limit of 55,000 to 60,000 square feet.Commission member C. Lawrence Wiskeman agreed, saying the centers would need large grocery stores as anchors.
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