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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 30, 1992
Black & Decker Corp. got a helping hand yesterday in its battle with Makita Corp. as the U.S. Commerce Department made a preliminary decision that Japanese makers of power saws, sanders and grinders are "dumping" their products and could be assessed extra duties.In its determination, the Commerce Department found Makita and other Japanese companies were selling professional saws and cutting equipment for 41.17 percent below "fair value, and sanders and grinders for 38.98 percent below fair value.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Maryland's economy has grown almost without fail in the last quarter-century, ticking up year after year. But not in 2013. That's according to early estimates from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which showed Maryland's gross domestic product stagnating last year - putting the state near the bottom of the national pack. Only the District of Columbia and Alaska fared worse. It's another indication that 2013 wasn't great for Maryland, where federal budget cuts had an outsized effect because of the state's big cluster of federal contractors and agencies.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
An effort by U.S. steel companies to block the flow of cheap foreign steel into the United States received a boost this week with a preliminary ruling by the U.S. Commerce Department that six countries were "dumping" steel pipe in the United States.The determination came three weeks after import quotas expired and talks on a multinational steel agreement broke down in Geneva. Since then, Bethlehem Steel Corp. and Inland Steel Industries Inc. have filed unfair-trade charges against steel producers in four countries.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland's growth in personal income last year was one of the smallest in the nation, a regionwide problem as federal furloughs and other cutbacks pinched earnings, the Department of Commerce said Tuesday. Maryland saw a 1.6 percent increase last year in personal income, which includes wages, dividends, interest and other payments. That compares to a 2.6 percent increase nationwide. Only West Virginia, with 1.5 percent, saw less growth, according to the Commerce Department. Virginia (1.7 percent)
BUSINESS
December 31, 1992
Indicators point to '93 growthThe nation's main gauge of the economy's prospects rose again in November, the government said yesterday, but other reports hinted that the fledgling recovery still has its share of trouble.The Commerce Department said its index of leading economic indicators climbed 0.8 percent last month, the strongest gain since February and the second increase in a row. But the department also said sales of new homes dropped a surprising 8.3 percent in November.@
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a ruling that will mean steep duties on portable Japanese word processors, the International Trade Commission determined yesterday that their sale in the United States at below fair market value had hurt U.S. producers.As a result of yesterday's decision, the Commerce Department will automatically assess anti-dumping duties of 58.71 percent on imports of the processors.The department had determined that the processors were being dumped in the U.S. market, or sold below fair market value.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
An effort by U.S. steel companies to block the flow of cheap foreign steel into the United States received a boost this week with a preliminary ruling by the U.S. Commerce Department that six countries were "dumping" steel pipe in the United States.The determination came three weeks after import quotas expired and talks on a multinational steel agreement broke down in Geneva. Since then, Bethlehem Steel Corp. and Inland Steel Industries Inc. have filed unfair-trade charges against steel producers in four countries.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service The Journal of Commerce contributed to this article | September 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Commerce Department tentatively ruled yesterday that several foreign steel companies were selling some types of bars and pipes in the United States at unfairly low prices or with unfair subsidies and moved to impose punitive customs duties on these imports.The rulings involve narrowly defined categories of pipes and bars. Imports in these cases totaled $314.5 million last year. The decisions are important mainly for the precedents they set for the Commerce Department's consideration this winter of 72 legal cases filed by U.S. steel producers June 30 against flat-rolled and plate steel imports from four dozen countries.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Employees of the Commerce Department spent much of yesterday in a state of subdued shock, monitoring radios and televisions for the latest reports about the plane crash in Croatia that may have killed the head of their department and several colleagues."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland's growth in personal income last year was one of the smallest in the nation, a regionwide problem as federal furloughs and other cutbacks pinched earnings, the Department of Commerce said Tuesday. Maryland saw a 1.6 percent increase last year in personal income, which includes wages, dividends, interest and other payments. That compares to a 2.6 percent increase nationwide. Only West Virginia, with 1.5 percent, saw less growth, according to the Commerce Department. Virginia (1.7 percent)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | November 15, 2008
As a government report showed yesterday that sales at the nation's retailers plunged to record lows in October, employees at Lauman's Home Furnishings in Perry Hall prepared to shut down for good. Sales at the 27-year-old furniture store on Belair Road slowed during the past year after customers lost jobs, were turned down for credit or put off buying new sofas, chairs and other furnishings amid the housing slump. But in the past two months, "It just really went beyond slow, and what else do you do?"
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | June 27, 2008
Maryland officials should not block a liquefied natural gas terminal proposed in eastern Baltimore County, the federal Department of Commerce said yesterday in a decision that could provide more momentum for the project's approval. Commerce Secretary Carlos M. Gutierrez concluded that the need for natural gas outweighs any environmental damage that could be caused by the LNG terminal and the dredging that would be needed in the Patapsco River to accommodate the tankers importing the fuel.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2007
Dealing a blow to a major Western Maryland manufacturer, the U.S. International Trade Commission decided not to slap tariffs on cheaper Asian paper imports. The 5-1 decision to overturn a decision by the Commerce Department to impose anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on coated and glossy paper from China, Indonesia and South Korea could have repercussions for NewPage Corp.'s Luke paper mill, with 950 employees the largest manufacturing plant in Allegany County. NewPage had filed the complaint seeking punitive tariffs, claiming the imports were being illegally subsidized and sold at unfairly low prices.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
The Commerce Department approved duties on imports of coated paper from China yesterday, brightening the future for several hundred workers at the NewPage paper mill in Allegany County and setting a precedent for other industries that have complained about unfair trade with China. Workers at the plant in Luke just saw 130 colleagues laid off after Dayton, Ohio-based NewPage Corp. permanently shut down line No. 7, blaming China for its woes. The company also temporarily idled a production line in Maine, which affected more than 50 jobs.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Some Chinese shrimp exporters will have to pay discouragingly hefty tariffs of more than 100 percent if they want their products to appear on American dinner tables, the Commerce Department ruled yesterday. The department's International Trade Commission also placed lower-than-expected tariffs on shrimp imports from Vietnam in a move likely to relieve pressure on the U.S. import market and prevent a surge in retail prices. The decisions were seen as a victory by the domestic shrimp industry, which has suffered in recent years as cheap shrimp imports from Latin America and Asia have increased supplies and dropped prices in the United States.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - The future of the U.S. shrimp industry and the price Americans pay for shrimp could be affected by a decision tomorrow by the Commerce Department on whether to charge tariffs on foreign shrimp. The tariffs would be imposed if the department determines that foreign shrimp farmers dumped cheap exports on the U.S. market - meaning sold for less than it costs to produce them - in an effort to harm the domestic shrimp industry. The Commerce Department will issue final determinations on tariffs for shrimp producers in China and Vietnam tomorrow, and for Thailand, India, Brazil and Ecuador in December.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2007
Dealing a blow to a major Western Maryland manufacturer, the U.S. International Trade Commission decided not to slap tariffs on cheaper Asian paper imports. The 5-1 decision to overturn a decision by the Commerce Department to impose anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on coated and glossy paper from China, Indonesia and South Korea could have repercussions for NewPage Corp.'s Luke paper mill, with 950 employees the largest manufacturing plant in Allegany County. NewPage had filed the complaint seeking punitive tariffs, claiming the imports were being illegally subsidized and sold at unfairly low prices.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
At least once a day, a CIA courier stops by the Department of Commerce in downtown Washington with a packet of top-secret information, gathered around the globe by satellites picking up phone calls, agents inside foreign governments and American spies posing as businessmen abroad.The Central Intelligence Agency packets have gotten fatter in recent years, as U.S. spies have shifted their focus from Soviet missiles to international trade. And the nuggets of information inside can be used not only to make policy but to make a buck.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Commerce Secretary William M. Daley has asked the department's inspector general to expand his investigation into whether officials systematically concealed and destroyed documents sought in a lawsuit, after a federal judge made those charges in a stinging rebuke of the department, officials said last week.Judge Royce C. Lamberth compared the behavior of former Commerce officials to that of "con artists" and "scofflaws." In harshly criticizing the department in a ruling last month, Lamberth demonstrated that he had lost patience in trying to supervise a lawsuit brought by Judicial Watch, a conservative group, against the department.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Orders placed with U.S. factories increased unexpectedly in July to a record level, a sign that manufacturing could be poised for faster growth, the Commerce Department said yesterday.The 0.2 percent increase in July factory orders to a seasonally adjusted $330.282 billion followed a revised 1.7 percent gain in June to $329.554 billion. Previously, the government estimated that June orders rose 1.2 percent to $327.9 billion. Before yesterday's report, analysts had expected a 0.1 percent decline in July factory orders.
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