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By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Congress reshuffles in the wake of this month's election, three Maryland members of the Republican-controlled House are taking on additional duties.Baltimore County Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican, and Baltimore Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Democrat, will both take seats on the Budget Committee, which fashions a blueprint for federal spending.Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a Prince George's County Democrat, is trading up from the Banking and Financial Services Committee to the Commerce Committee, which regulates most of the nation's business, ranging from securities to biomedical research.
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NEWS
April 12, 2008
Rep. Albert R. Wynn, who is leaving Congress at the end of May to become a lobbyist, has resigned from the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee. Ethics watchdogs had called on the Prince George's County Democrat to step down from the committee for the remainder of his House tenure, citing the potential for conflicts of interest involving clients of Dickstein Shapiro LLP, the Washington lobbying firm he is to join in May. In a statement, Wynn said he believed he had complied with "both the letter and the spirit" of the congressional ethics laws, but would resign from the committee to avoid becoming a "distraction."
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NEWS
April 12, 2008
Rep. Albert R. Wynn, who is leaving Congress at the end of May to become a lobbyist, has resigned from the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee. Ethics watchdogs had called on the Prince George's County Democrat to step down from the committee for the remainder of his House tenure, citing the potential for conflicts of interest involving clients of Dickstein Shapiro LLP, the Washington lobbying firm he is to join in May. In a statement, Wynn said he believed he had complied with "both the letter and the spirit" of the congressional ethics laws, but would resign from the committee to avoid becoming a "distraction."
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - An influential House committee has joined in the congressional investigation of U.S. prescription drug safety, issuing records requests yesterday to the Food and Drug Administration and the drug manufacturer Merck & Co. The House Energy and Commerce Committee said it was seeking to understand how the heart risks of Merck's painkiller Vioxx were not addressed before the FDA approved the drug in 1999. Merck withdrew Vioxx from the market Sept. 30 after a company-sponsored study confirmed problems that critics had warned about.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - An influential House committee has joined in the congressional investigation of U.S. prescription drug safety, issuing records requests yesterday to the Food and Drug Administration and the drug manufacturer Merck & Co. The House Energy and Commerce Committee said it was seeking to understand how the heart risks of Merck's painkiller Vioxx were not addressed before the FDA approved the drug in 1999. Merck withdrew Vioxx from the market Sept. 30 after a company-sponsored study confirmed problems that critics had warned about.
BUSINESS
By New York Daily News | September 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Warren E. Buffett, the homespun billionaire on a mission to clean up Salomon Bros. Inc., bowed to the inevitable yesterday and said he welcomed the tighter controls Congress is aiming at the $2.3 trillion government securities ZTC market."
BUSINESS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | May 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A House committee voted unanimously yesterday to turn over a large segment of the radio spectrum, previously reserved for the government, to commercial uses.The approval of the House Energy and Commerce Committee marked an important step toward finding room on the crowded airwaves for new technologies such as pocket-sized radio telephones, digital radio and computers that transmit data over the air.The new legislation does not endorse particular technologies, nor does it settle the sticky issue of how the new frequencies will be allocated.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After months of deadlock, the committee that many had considered the most important health reform testing ground in the House gave up its effort to produce a bill, saying yesterday that its membership appeared hopelessly at odds.More than any other single development, this one captured how difficult it has become to find a middle ground between the left, right and a myriad of special interests.At one point, the Energy and Commerce Committee had been regarded as the most fertile ground in the House for a grand health compromise.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The fragile balance of power in the telecommunications industry may have tilted a bit more toward the powerful regional Bell phone companies after Tuesday's national elections. Legislation that would help local phone giants such as Verizon Communications Corp. gain in areas such as broadband Internet service has been blocked by the Democratic-led Senate. And the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell, has been restrained from pushing an aggressive deregulatory agenda that might favor the Bells because of the party split in Congress.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rolling over the protests of several Democrats, the House of Representatives' Commerce Committee voted yesterday to kill most cable television price regulation and lift scores of restrictions on the number of television, radio and other media properties a single company can own.The committee voted 38-5 in favor of a bill to overhaul the laws governing virtually every sector of the nation's communications industry. But battles over several particular provisions, which came earlier in the day, were more bitter and partisan.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The fragile balance of power in the telecommunications industry may have tilted a bit more toward the powerful regional Bell phone companies after Tuesday's national elections. Legislation that would help local phone giants such as Verizon Communications Corp. gain in areas such as broadband Internet service has been blocked by the Democratic-led Senate. And the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell, has been restrained from pushing an aggressive deregulatory agenda that might favor the Bells because of the party split in Congress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sherron S. Watkins, the Enron executive who warned six months ago that the company's accounting practices could bring it down, plans to tell Congress today that Enron's questionable handling of partnership deals was widely known within the company, according to congressional investigators who have interviewed her. Watkins, who in August warned Kenneth L. Lay, Enron's chairman, that the company would be found out to be an "elaborate accounting...
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - Stood up by former Enron Chairman Kenneth L. Lay as they prepared to grill him on the collapse of the energy behemoth, Senate lawmakers shot back yesterday with preparations for a subpoena aimed at forcing his testimony. The Senate Commerce Committee plans to vote today on a subpoena that would compel Lay to face questions about events leading to the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history, which robbed thousands of workers of their retirement funds while top managers earned millions from off-the-books partnerships and stock sales.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 2001
NEW YORK - As lawmakers expressed outrage over how a company could collapse so quickly with so little warning, Enron Corp. sought protection from some of its creditors in Europe yesterday and warned traders on its online unit. With business a sliver of its level just weeks ago, the once a giant energy trading company was desperately looking for ways to restructure, most likely in a bankruptcy filing within days. The ripples were felt from Houston, where edgy employees at the company's headquarters ran a gantlet of photographers and braced themselves for anticipated layoffs, to Brazil and India, where jockeying began over control of Enron properties.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan coalition of senators formally unveiled sweeping tobacco legislation yesterday that would extract a half-trillion dollars from the cigarette industry but would limit how much the industry would have to pay in damages each year.The proposal would not give the companies immunity from class action lawsuits or punitive damages, as tobacco lawyers have demanded. But it would limit the industry's payouts at $6.5 billion a year, granting the embattled tobacco companies a measure of the stability they desperately want.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Congress reshuffles in the wake of this month's election, three Maryland members of the Republican-controlled House are taking on additional duties.Baltimore County Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican, and Baltimore Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Democrat, will both take seats on the Budget Committee, which fashions a blueprint for federal spending.Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a Prince George's County Democrat, is trading up from the Banking and Financial Services Committee to the Commerce Committee, which regulates most of the nation's business, ranging from securities to biomedical research.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sherron S. Watkins, the Enron executive who warned six months ago that the company's accounting practices could bring it down, plans to tell Congress today that Enron's questionable handling of partnership deals was widely known within the company, according to congressional investigators who have interviewed her. Watkins, who in August warned Kenneth L. Lay, Enron's chairman, that the company would be found out to be an "elaborate accounting...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | September 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In the winter of 1990, Rep. Tom McMillen suddenly began picking up lucrative support from some new-found friends.The New York State Electric & Gas Corp. PAC gave $1,000 to the Anne Arundel County congressman's re-election campaign. Pacific Gas and Electric's PAC donated $2,500 and Southwestern Bell's PAC kicked in $2,000.Mr. McMillen, elected to Congress in 1986, had never before received support from these or 22 other utility and telecommunications PACs (political action committees)
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 14, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- With no official duties until last evening's convention session, most of the Maryland delegation spent the day at play -- getting a tan, sightseeing on Coronado Island or fishing in the Pacific.A few of the more ambitious members, though, went to work -- on their political careers.Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. of Baltimore County attended a party for the chairman of the House Commerce Committee, which he might like to join. The committee handles a variety of issues affecting businesses, which, in turn, contribute generously to members' campaigns.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rolling over the protests of several Democrats, the House of Representatives' Commerce Committee voted yesterday to kill most cable television price regulation and lift scores of restrictions on the number of television, radio and other media properties a single company can own.The committee voted 38-5 in favor of a bill to overhaul the laws governing virtually every sector of the nation's communications industry. But battles over several particular provisions, which came earlier in the day, were more bitter and partisan.
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