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By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 25, 2014
One of the unsung blessings of Twitter is the way it continually reminds us that willful ignorance is alive and thriving in the American body politic. In the past week, we were treated to widely retweeted photos purporting to show Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol throwing a gang sign. The first controversial image showed up on an unvetted CNN social media webpage called iReport, and Internet trolls took it from there. The only problem is that the hand sign in question was the greeting of Kappa Alpha Psi, a historically black fraternity of which Johnson is a member.
NEWS
By Gregory E. Thornton | August 25, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to correct the number of chronically absent city students.  As the new school year starts in Baltimore City, I want to express my gratitude for the opportunity to build on the work that has been done in the past, and lead the school district and its students and families on the journey to excellence. I applaud the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners, elected officials at every level of government, and our school families and communities for their staunch support of city schools throughout the education reform process in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Susan Cochran | August 25, 2014
On Aug. 26, 1920, Congress certified passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing all women citizens the right to vote. The jubilant day - since proclaimed "Women's Equality Day" - climaxed a long persistent half-century campaign for women's suffrage and led to the creation that year of the League of Women Voters. But equality did not automatically come along with the right to vote. And today, nearly a century later, there is still much work to be done. While significant progress has been made through legislation and court action in reversing laws and practices detrimental to women - including those by banks and lenders denying women mortgages on homes and care loans - inequities remain.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 24, 2014
Recently, I was talking with a conservative friend of mine about the drama in Gaza. I knew this individual to be thoughtful about world events and staunchly pro-Israel in outlook. It was sometime after our mutual condemnation of Hamas that our conversation took an unexpected and disturbing turn. Seems my friend is frustrated with the Obama administration's tepid support of Benjamin Netanyahu's government and the Jewish voters who re-elected the U.S. president, a soft-on-Israel candidate.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 24, 2014
A truism: Almost nobody looks good in his booking photo. That said, the 47th governor of Texas, one James Richard Perry, certainly gave it his best shot when he faced the camera at the Travis County Courthouse last week. The resultant image is ... not terrible. Perry is caught somewhere between a tight smile and an outright grimace, his mien taut with confidence and seriousness of purpose. Gazing on that photo, one cannot help but suspect that a transparently political indictment designed by his Democratic opponents to cripple this presumed presidential aspirant might actually help him instead.
NEWS
By Robert McLean | August 23, 2014
I have watched the growing popularity of the "Ice Bucket Challenge" Facebook campaign against ALS - in which people dare others to record themselves being doused with ice water and/or make a donation to an ALS charity - with growing unease over the past week. My father, a physician at the University of Maryland, died of this little-known disease in 2001, about the time viral videos were beginning to take off. Until a couple of weeks ago, it was unthinkable that more than 2 percent of Americans would even have heard of ALS, though significantly more had at least heard of Lou Gehrig's disease - its other name.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 22, 2014
"Josh" is an attorney in the federal government who finds out from one of those dreaded staff surveys that the lawyers working for him aren't feeling the love. They don't think their hard work is appreciated, but he always lets them know when they screw up. The people working under him don't much like his management style. It's no surprise that Josh gets defensive and then disdainful. "Grown-up lawyers shouldn't expect to be thanked for just doing excellent work," he said. "They get paid, don't they?"
NEWS
By Tony Brown | August 22, 2014
My sophomore year Harvard announced a cost-cutting measure that made the news. Going forward the school would continue to provide toilet paper to freshmen dorms, but upper classmen would have to provide for themselves. Almost immediately, toilet paper began disappearing from buildings all over campus. One Monday night my roommate and I discovered that we were low on supplies, so after dinner we walked up the hill to Harvard Yard to visit the freshmen dorms. In a building with communal bathrooms (where we could easily lay hands on a few rolls)
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Hillary Clinton's tactical retreat in her soft apology and meet-up with President Obama at Martha's Vineyard, after her ill-timed criticism of his "failure" in aiding Syrian refugees, indicates she may not be quite ready to put her best foot forward for the 2016 presidential race. Her remark in her interview with The Atlantic magazine, otherwise fulsome in praise of him, came at a time when Mr. Obama is struggling with a full plate of foreign policy woes. Inadvertently or not, it seemed politically self-serving, as she seems bent on shoring up her own acceptance with the more liberal elements in her own party.
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