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By Mark Matthews Sr | April 9, 2014
"Oh, Baltimore, ain't it hard just to live?" Nina Simone lamented in song about life in the city back in 1978, and not much has changed since then for the tens of thousands of residents who are living in poverty, are homeless or who are suffering unemployment due to a background check that prevented them from getting work. Legislation currently before the Baltimore City Council - Council Bill 13-301, to ban the checkbox that asks about a job seeker's criminal history on the employment applications of companies doing business in the city - has been held up by critics and is in danger of dying.
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NEWS
By Kareem Burney | April 9, 2014
The dearth of women and certain minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields represents a huge problem within this country and is a crisis often repeated in the news today. These stories often provide the same problem and, more often than not, suggest the same solution: that the education system must improve to better provide STEM skills to minorities before college. I am not in disagreement with this view; however, as an African American child growing up in Detroit, I developed a love and skill for science more from programs within the community rather than those within the school system.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 8, 2014
Until Film director Darren Aronofsky got his hands on it, the old tale of Noah's Ark had devolved into a cute children's fable of giraffes and elephants and bears and bunnies crowding onto a big boat. Aronofsky has re-envisioned it as what it really has always been: an apocalyptic, end-of-the-world disaster story. Biblical literalists, though, are not entirely happy about this new telling of one of the most ancient stories in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Aronofsky's "Noah" opened Friday in theaters across America and the big question for Paramount, the studio that paid more than $130 million to produce the film, is whether the large Christian audience that showed up for Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" and the more recent "Son of God" will pay to see what Aronofsky has called "the least biblical film ever made.
NEWS
By J. Howard Kucher | April 8, 2014
The "state of the city" is a hot topic right now. In this paper and many social media sites, there's a lot of talk about Baltimore - Are we OK? Should we move? Should we dig in? The discussion eventually comes back to concern about crime and murder rates in our fair city. Reading all of this, one question kept coming to me: Where is the church? For the record, I'm aware that there are many churches doing great things in this town. And the church has always been a leader in providing charitable support for the less fortunate.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | April 8, 2014
During an interview on the recent Fort Hood shootings committed by Army Spec. Ivan Lopez, who killed three people then himself, CNN's Chris Cuomo suggested that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder be referred to as just Post Traumatic Stress - leaving off "disorder" because of the "stigma" associated with the term. This is a clear example of the futility of eliminating stigma through rhetorical fiat. It simply cannot be done. The issue is decades old, and there is little, if any, reason to believe that there will ever be the elimination or even diminishment therein of stigma, defined as a source of infamy or disgrace.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bodensiek | April 8, 2014
The Maryland legislature last week passed a 2015 budget, and it includes $12 million to help create jobs in Maryland's innovative biotech and life science sector. That's a smart use of resources. For lawmakers looking to put residents back to work, our state's high-tech sectors have been bright spots - especially our vanguard biotech industry, which accounts for more than 11 percent of the Maryland economy. In Baltimore, Emergent Technologies is now staffing 200 new workers; this year, Montgomery County's Precision for Medicine will add 170 to the rolls; and in 2011, Frederick-based Life Technologies hired 100 people.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 7, 2014
Forty years ago, Congress enacted sweeping limits on political campaign spending in the wake of a shocking disclosure that one man - Chicago insurance executive W. Clement Stone - had given more than $3 million for the 1972 reelection of President Richard M. Nixon. The amount seemed outlandish then, in a campaign in which Nixon waltzed to victory over his Democratic opponent, Sen. George McGovern, winning 49 states and losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. It was an easily predictable drubbing.
NEWS
By Nilay Saiya | April 7, 2014
The White House has responded to Russian actions in Crimea by taking a number of steps against Moscow: It has ramped up sanctions, verbally denounced the Kremlin's flouting of international law, effectively kicked Russia out of the G8 and given rhetorical support to Ukraine's new government. Such measures, however, are likely to deepen and prolong the crisis, not resolve it. The conventional view in Washington is that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a belligerent authoritarian intent upon expanding Russia's borders and confronting the West.
NEWS
By Debbie McFadden | April 7, 2014
My daughter, Tatyana McFadden, was born with a disability - an underdeveloped spinal cord that resulted in paralysis below her waist - in St. Petersburg, Russia. She fought for her life then, and later, with the same determination, for her right to compete in athletics. Now, we are fighting for the rights of others around the world. My daughter Tatyana McFadden is a world-champion athlete. She is the only person - man or woman, disabled or not - to win four premier marathon races in one year.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 7, 2014
If it is really April, why does everything in the garden look so dead? You are going to hear that a lot this month. Gardeners and non-gardeners alike, trapped by cold and snow for months, have rushed outdoors to find so much looking so brown. It might not be dead, just burned, damaged by the terrible cold of this winter, the coldest in Baltimore in 30 years. Wait through May and even into June for signs of new growth before you give up on your garden. There may be life in there yet. Winter burn is just one of the problems we gardeners will face during this late spring.
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