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By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 5, 2014
Thousands of miles on the road this summer and fall have afforded me the opportunity to observe a variety of political ads from across the spectrum. Herewith, observations from the heartland: I assume the relentless Democratic campaign to demonize the conservative Koch Brothers and their "Americans for Prosperity" organization has been poll tested, but I still don't get it. Driving negatives against someone (or something) that few people recognize violates a core tenet of political advertising.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 5, 2014
Let us give Sean Groubert every benefit of the doubt. Let us assume he is a good person. Let us assume he is kind to children, well liked by neighbors. And by all means, let's assume he has a black friend. For good measure, let's assume he has two. Now, with those assumptions in force, let's ponder why Mr. Groubert, a white South Carolina state trooper, shot an unarmed black man last month at a gas station in Columbia. The incident has received less notice than did the shooting of Michael Brown, probably because the victim, 35-year-old Levar Jones, survived.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
NEWS
By Owen Kirby | October 3, 2014
Is America responsible for the chaos engulfing the Middle East? It is a question not far from many a Washington discussion of current events. With the Islamic State's fanatics erasing the region's colonial borders, for some the answer is evident: The U.S. upended the established order when it invaded Iraq in 2003, the repercussions of which are being faced now and likely for years to come. Requiring little perspective, this analysis has been embraced by a number of pundits. As is often the case in the Middle East, the reality is not so simple.
NEWS
By Robert Blecker | October 3, 2014
The root cause of undocumented immigration, whether from Mexico or Central America, is the poverty and lack of economic opportunity that have afflicted those nations as a result of failed economic policies - including their trade agreements with the United States. Those thousands of migrants - including unaccompanied minors - arriving at our border are not criminals trying to break the law. They are a warning sign that the collateral damage of so-called "free trade" agreements cannot always be found in closed factories and shuttered Main Street businesses in the United States.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 3, 2014
The presidential election of 2012 and Maryland's gubernatorial election of 2014 have much in common rhetorically in terms of their approaches to issues and spin, the two key components of political persuasion. The 2012 presidential election pitted a likable African-American Democratic incumbent president against a white, older Republican who had been out of politics for years. The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race features a likable incumbent African-American Democratic lieutenant governor against a white, older Republican who has been out of politics for years.
NEWS
By Anthony G. Brown | October 2, 2014
Editor's note: The Sun also plans to run an op-ed by Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan in the coming weeks.  This week, we marked the one-year anniversary of a lifesaving law taking effect, the Firearm Safety Act. But, Marylanders still stand at a crossroads between two very different futures for our state. In 2013, in response to the tragic Newtown school shooting and the all too common acts of gun violence on our own streets, we took real action to protect our communities by passing some of the toughest gun safety laws in the nation.
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