Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCommentary
IN THE NEWS

Commentary

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Montgomery County Judge Richard E. Jordan was so appalled by the actions of former Baltimore Police Officer Alec Taylor that he went outside sentencing guidelines to order the man committed to jail for a year - four times the maximum recommendation of three months. Mr. Taylor's crime? Beating a dog to death. The facts of the case are pretty horrific. The officer pummeled "Rocko," a tiny Jack Russell terrier, with a mop, choked him and left him lying on the floor all because the pup had soiled a rug. Mr. Taylor then sent a girlfriend a series of unemotional text messages about the beating, including this one: "Yeah I think he's pretty much dead.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Hensley | October 13, 2014
I've taught math at Oakland Mills High School in Howard County for seven years. In that time, I've read hundreds of articles about the problems in American math education. But I've yet to see a mention of the single biggest crisis I face in my classroom. Howard County has a policy of placing every ninth grade student into at least Algebra I - even if the student is currently doing math at a fourth grade level. As a direct result of this policy, students enter my classroom lacking essential prerequisite knowledge.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 1, 2012
So much for unbiased reporting. One look at the three headlines on the entire commentary page of the Tuesday, Oct. 30 edition of The Sun says it all. "The 2012 elephant in the room: George W. Bush. " "Md. congressional map is fair, legal. " And here's the topper: "Romney's jobs failure. " Except for the token weekly column you allow Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the rest the paper is undeniably an organ for Democrat positions. Thomas R. Foster, Parkville
NEWS
By Anirban Basu | October 13, 2014
Energy production has emerged as arguably the primary growth engine for America's economy. Oil production is surging, and the United States will emerge as the world's leading producer sometime this decade. America has already established self-sufficiency in natural gas, with the construction of many liquefied natural gas terminals that would export gas now under consideration. Wind and solar costs are falling, and America continues to be the largest producer of the globe's most reliable carbon free energy source: nuclear power.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 14, 2014
The story of a teenage mother and her foul-mouthed two-year-old son made big national news this past week. The video of the cursing toddler quickly went viral - a fitting term, that - and soon television producers had the kind of story they crave. In today's media age, whether in the regular news or so-called reality television, the best stories are those for which viewers and listeners need almost zero information or background as a point of entry - subjects as mundane as traffic or as divisive as race and almost any story involving family, interpersonal relationships and parenting.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 9, 2014
Newspapers are in trouble. Not just because of the Internet and advertising and subscriptions. But because, according to a recent Pew Research Center poll, only 28 percent of Americans think that journalists contribute a lot to society's well being. That's pretty bad considering that journalists like to think of themselves as guardians of democracy. In other business enterprises, such public disdain would be a cause for alarm. But newspapers are different. Criticize journalistic professionalism, and you're likely to hear a thing or two about the importance of the First Amendment, or my favorite catch-all self-justification: If people are unhappy with us, "we must be doing something right!"
EXPLORE
March 2, 2013
I applaud Maria Santo's  journalistic valor in her article regarding abortion last week.  Her perspicacious treatment of our country's involvement in this sordid business aptly pierces the twisted logic that has rationalized and legalized the killing of 54,000,000 children. I have always wondered how some individuals abhor domestic abuse, blanch at schoolyard bullying, cringe at animal cruelty and wince at terrorist waterboarding while turning a blind eye and deaf ear to wide-spread torturing of the pre-born.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 8, 2014
Everybody was afraid of freezing. I was afraid of falling. During the recent polar vortex - we used to call them cold snaps - warnings were issued about frostbite and how quickly it can attack bare skin when temperatures drop into the single digits and below. But while the rest of the world was covering up, I was concentrating on staying upright. I have what is known as a fear of falling, and I should, because I fall often enough. It is a natural fear and typical of most humans, to varying degrees.
NEWS
By Timothy D. Armbruster | December 9, 2013
Since coming to Baltimore nearly 35 years ago to work for the Goldseker and, later, Baltimore Community foundations, I have had the good fortune to observe and participate in the city's civic and philanthropic life during a period of profound change in the region's economic and social fortunes. And while the very difficult challenges of poverty, low educational attainment and crime are still very much with us, Baltimore's future seems, to me at least, a lot brighter than it was in I first arrived.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 16, 2014
In 1886, the New York Times and the Chicago News engaged in a mild war of words over whether it is necessary for a gentleman to remove his hat on an elevator when there are ladies in the car. More than 100 years later, the estimable Miss Manners, the final authority on all things polite and impolite, was asked to enumerate the rules of elevator etiquette. Her most memorable declaration might have been that if you fail to successfully hold the door open for an approaching passenger "assume a look of regretful ineptitude to show that person that nothing personal was intended.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 13, 2014
It's often said and written that presidents, to achieve greatness, require great challenges. Washington had the challenge of creating a new nation; Lincoln had the Civil War; FDR faced the Great Depression and World War II. All clearly qualified by that standard and achieved greatness. By contrast consider Bill Clinton, who had two successful terms marred mostly by a personal scandal that brought him impeachment but acquittal. It has been noted that he encountered no major national crisis during his presidency, the resolution of which might have brought him greatness in history's annals.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 12, 2014
Author Jonathan Eig recalls hearing a rabbi say in a sermon that The Pill was the most important invention of the 20th century and scoffing at that declaration. He could think of half a dozen inventions more important. And besides, who invented it? If The Pill was so important, why wasn't there an Alexander Graham Bell or a Henry Ford story to go with it? Mr. Eig has now written that story. A rollicking, super-secret race against time, the Catholic Church and the federal government run by a disenfranchised scientist, a Catholic gynecologist women instinctively trusted, a woman who championed the pleasure of sex for women and her immensely wealthy friend.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 12, 2014
"[O]ne man appears to be a more eligible dispenser of the mercy of government, than a body of men. " - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 74 Every politician wants a legacy - an issue or institution that evolves far beyond the official's time in public office. Sometimes, unexpected events intervene and the intended legacy items do not go according to plan. My experience is a good example of such an unplanned legacy. Some of you will recall our administration's steadfast support for charter schools - public schools that enjoy a greater degree of autonomy than the standard public school.
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Montgomery County Judge Richard E. Jordan was so appalled by the actions of former Baltimore Police Officer Alec Taylor that he went outside sentencing guidelines to order the man committed to jail for a year - four times the maximum recommendation of three months. Mr. Taylor's crime? Beating a dog to death. The facts of the case are pretty horrific. The officer pummeled "Rocko," a tiny Jack Russell terrier, with a mop, choked him and left him lying on the floor all because the pup had soiled a rug. Mr. Taylor then sent a girlfriend a series of unemotional text messages about the beating, including this one: "Yeah I think he's pretty much dead.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 12, 2014
Last week, a federal judge told us what we already knew. Namely, that police in Ferguson, Mo., violated the rights of protesters demonstrating against the shooting death of Michael Brown. U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry struck down an ad hoc rule under which cops had said people could not stand still while peacefully protesting. Some were told they couldn't stop walking for more than five seconds; others that they had to walk faster. Again: These were not rioters. These were citizens seeking "peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances," as the First Amendment gives them the right to do. So Perry's ruling is welcome, but not particularly surprising.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | October 12, 2014
Last Monday, the extraordinary Synod of Bishops to discuss the "Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization" began in Rome. The synod represents a key moment in the papacy of Pope Francis and in the life of the Roman Catholic Church, which is looking for more effective ways of communicating what it believes and teaches about marriage and family life and of supporting those who wish to live according to church teaching and are struggling to do so in the face of contemporary challenges.
NEWS
By Stephanie Beran | May 11, 2014
This is the last of my six columns for The Baltimore Sun. I thank the editors for the scary, yet fun, opportunity to find my "voice" and share my thoughts on women and business. Publicly expressing my opinions has strengthened my views that diversity is essential, careers are long and varied, and challenges arise in strange shapes and times. It has also reinforced my belief that women must be confident and not fear failure. Years ago I was offered a fabulous job but was concerned I wasn't qualified.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 10, 2014
Janay Rice's comments in support of her husband Ray, tossed out of football by the Baltimore Ravens and the National Football League, have stoked the fires of outrage that have blazed since video surfaced Monday of him hitting her. But this time, it is directed at her. She posted a message to her followers on Instagram saying that she felt like she was living in a nightmare of loss and public humiliation, and she pledged that she and Rice would...
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 11, 2014
Three points need to be made about Monday's  decision by the Supreme Court not to decide whether the equal protection clause of the Constitution grants people of the same sex the right to marry. Point 1: While the court's liberal wing probably wanted to accept cases banning same-sex marriage in five states that have been overturned by three different federal appeals courts in recent months, the conservative majority, along with swing Justice Anthony Kennedy, apparently wished to see states resolve the issue.
NEWS
By Donald P. Hutchinson | October 9, 2014
In the past (almost) seven years since I came to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore as president and CEO, I've said many times that the zoo is a place full of life and stories - funny stories, sad stories, public stories and private stories. Judging from the comments I have been getting from visitors lately, stories about all of the new exhibits at the zoo - including the recently opened Penguin Coast - may be some of the best stories yet. In 2008, it was widely reported that we were at a critical juncture at the zoo - and that was true then.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.