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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Brig. Gen. Janis L. Karpinski, the overall commander of the military police accused of abusing Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison, who was disciplined for "serious deficiencies" in handling her troops, has been removed from command of her brigade, officials said yesterday. Karpinski commanded the 800th Military Police Brigade, which temporarily included the Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company and the seven of its soldiers who were criminally charged. She has been reassigned to the U.S. Army Reserve Readiness Command at Fort Jackson, S.C. , said Al Schilf, a spokesman for the Army Reserve.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
Brigadier General Bruce T. Crawford officially assumed command of the Army Communications-Electronics Command and of Aberdeen Proving Ground on Tuesday during a 10 a.m. ceremony at the post's C4ISR Center of Excellence Campus. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the Army Materiel Command, presided over the ceremony and welcomed Crawford to the AMC family. Both generals greeted the more than 400 soldiers, dignitaries, employees and assembled guests. "Brig. Gen. Crawford knows communications, he knows the warfighter and he is well respected within the Army's Signal community and the Joint C4 [command, control, communications, computers]
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
The outgoing garrison commander of Fort Meade will delay making a recommendation on moving the Herman L. Toulson Correctional Boot Camp to the post in order to get more public input, a spokesman announced yesterday.The delay by Col. Kent D. Menser apparently will leave a decision on the controversial proposal in the hands of his successor, Col. Robert G. Morris III. Colonel Menser retires Wednesday.The colonel had said he would forward his recommendation on the camp to the commanding general of Fort Meade before his retirement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Retired Army Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, the former top military commander in Iraq, delivered a blistering critique of U.S. involvement in the Iraq conflict yesterday, calling American political leaders "incompetent." Addressing an audience of journalists who cover the military, Sanchez said the armed force's mission to invade Iraq and overthrow Saddam Hussein was flawed from the start. National leaders, said Sanchez, "have unquestionably been derelict in the performance of their duty."
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
The former head of military intelligence at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, Army Col. Thomas M. Pappas, acknowledged in court yesterday that he failed to set clear rules for interrogation of detainees and, on one occasion, authorized the use of dogs in questioning a suspect without gaining approval from the commanding general in Iraq. Pappas said the use of dogs began at Abu Ghraib after a September 2003 visit from Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller, the former commander of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
The commanding general of Aberdeen Proving Ground's Ordnance Center and School, where prohibited relationships between drill sergeants and trainees sparked the worst sex scandal in Army history, is being shifted to a post in Georgia with his career untarnished.Army officials characterized Maj. Gen. Robert D. Shadley's move to Fort McPherson outside Atlanta as a routine, lateral transfer.But critics -- including some Congress members -- denounced the reassignment, expected to occur this summer.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Benjamin F. Dean, retired commanding general of the Maryland Army National Guard, died of cancer Monday at his Cockeysville home. He was 85. Born in Harrisonburg, Va., he left school to help support his family and worked as a lineman stringing wires in a remote area that had no electricity. He enlisted as a private in a local National Guard unit in 1938 and was inducted into federal service as part of the 29th Infantry Division in 1941. That year he became a first sergeant and entered Officer Candidate School at Edgewood, graduating as a lieutenant in the Chemical Corps in 1942.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
Brigadier General Bruce T. Crawford officially assumed command of the Army Communications-Electronics Command and of Aberdeen Proving Ground on Tuesday during a 10 a.m. ceremony at the post's C4ISR Center of Excellence Campus. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the Army Materiel Command, presided over the ceremony and welcomed Crawford to the AMC family. Both generals greeted the more than 400 soldiers, dignitaries, employees and assembled guests. "Brig. Gen. Crawford knows communications, he knows the warfighter and he is well respected within the Army's Signal community and the Joint C4 [command, control, communications, computers]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The commanding general of the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground has decided to retire after admitting that he committed adultery while separated from his wife more than five years ago, Pentagon officials said yesterday.The officials said the commander, Maj. Gen. John Longhouser, became the subject of an inquiry after an anonymous tip about the affair was received over a telephone hot line established because of a flurry of sex abuse cases at Aberdeen, where male drill sergeants had preyed on young female recruits.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondents | September 20, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- First units of the U.S. intervention force, armed for battle but on a mission of peace, swept into this explosive capital by land and sea, receiving what their commanding general described as a "warm welcome" from the Haitians.By sundown almost 3,000 troops were ready to help keep the opponents and supporters of returning President Jean-Bertrand Aristide from each other's throats, but as dusk fell, the first public clash occurred between pro-Aristide supporters, demanding the arrest of this island's military leaders, and the junta's paramilitary forces.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Benjamin F. Dean, retired commanding general of the Maryland Army National Guard, died of cancer Monday at his Cockeysville home. He was 85. Born in Harrisonburg, Va., he left school to help support his family and worked as a lineman stringing wires in a remote area that had no electricity. He enlisted as a private in a local National Guard unit in 1938 and was inducted into federal service as part of the 29th Infantry Division in 1941. That year he became a first sergeant and entered Officer Candidate School at Edgewood, graduating as a lieutenant in the Chemical Corps in 1942.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
The former head of military intelligence at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, Army Col. Thomas M. Pappas, acknowledged in court yesterday that he failed to set clear rules for interrogation of detainees and, on one occasion, authorized the use of dogs in questioning a suspect without gaining approval from the commanding general in Iraq. Pappas said the use of dogs began at Abu Ghraib after a September 2003 visit from Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller, the former commander of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Brig. Gen. Janis L. Karpinski, the overall commander of the military police accused of abusing Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison, who was disciplined for "serious deficiencies" in handling her troops, has been removed from command of her brigade, officials said yesterday. Karpinski commanded the 800th Military Police Brigade, which temporarily included the Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company and the seven of its soldiers who were criminally charged. She has been reassigned to the U.S. Army Reserve Readiness Command at Fort Jackson, S.C. , said Al Schilf, a spokesman for the Army Reserve.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
The tip-off was Edgar Prado. He gave up a day's mounts at Gulfstream Park to ride one horse yesterday at Laurel Park. The horse, Well Fancied, won. A New York-bred trained by Richard Dutrow Jr., Well Fancied darted to the front at the start of the $200,000 General George Handicap and led every step to a length victory and an upset of 3-5 favorite Badge of Silver. Prado, who had ridden Well Fancied in his five previous races, stuck with the horse even though it was his only mount of the afternoon.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Army Gen. Tommy R. Franks, who commanded the forces that toppled Saddam Hussein's government, said yesterday that American soldiers could be patrolling Iraq four years from now and that the current level of U.S. troops - about 145,000 - will probably have to be maintained into next year. "I anticipate that we will be involved in Iraq in the future, and, sir, I don't know whether that means two years or four years. I just don't know," Franks told members of the House Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nobody ever said, and for good reason, that "war is heck." It's a brutal, deadly resort to force, no matter how justified it may be deemed. Even as the Pentagon low-balls casualties, both U.S. military and Iraqi civilian, television and the press are confirming that the much-heralded "shock and awe" strategy of overwhelming firepower to oust Saddam Hussein has come at a costly human price. The Bush administration, after floating the notion that Iraqi soldiers and civilians might well greet American troops with open arms, and encouraging them to do so with an aerial bombardment of "surrender" leaflets, is now singing a more sober song.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nobody ever said, and for good reason, that "war is heck." It's a brutal, deadly resort to force, no matter how justified it may be deemed. Even as the Pentagon low-balls casualties, both U.S. military and Iraqi civilian, television and the press are confirming that the much-heralded "shock and awe" strategy of overwhelming firepower to oust Saddam Hussein has come at a costly human price. The Bush administration, after floating the notion that Iraqi soldiers and civilians might well greet American troops with open arms, and encouraging them to do so with an aerial bombardment of "surrender" leaflets, is now singing a more sober song.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The top U.S. military commander in the Persian Gulf yesterday criticized a congressional proposal to topple Saddam Hussein with a $100 million Iraqi opposition force, saying it was poorly conceived and could produce an even more dangerous situation: an Iraq dissolved into Afghanistan-like chaos.The Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 passed with strong bipartisan support this month and authorized $2 million for broadcasting and $97 million in military aid for an anti-Hussein army, although it did not require that the money be spent.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | May 20, 2001
RACIAL politics could end up killing Baltimore. Literally. The current spectacle of an inept, misdirected City Council trying to dictate personnel policies to the city's police commissioner, based on the color of an officer's skin, sent a signal of meddling in an area that should be hands-off for politicians. Hiring and firing in a quasi-military department as vital as the police department should be left to the commanding general -- Commissioner Edward T. Norris. You can't win a war if politicians are dictating who will lead the police battalions into battle.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The top U.S. military commander in the Persian Gulf yesterday criticized a congressional proposal to topple Saddam Hussein with a $100 million Iraqi opposition force, saying it was poorly conceived and could produce an even more dangerous situation: an Iraq dissolved into Afghanistan-like chaos.The Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 passed with strong bipartisan support this month and authorized $2 million for broadcasting and $97 million in military aid for an anti-Hussein army, although it did not require that the money be spent.
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