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Commander In Chief

NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf -- conqueror of the Iraqis, near-gainsayer of the president and outspoken scourge of anything he regards as "bovine scatology" -- showed yesterday he knew also when to shut up.The commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf was honored at lunch with President Bush and top aides at the White House following his homecoming Sunday.On their way from the Oval Office, the group stopped for pictures on the steps leading to the Rose Garden, where an army of reporters and TV crews was gathered.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As grumbling increases on Capitol Hill about "another Vietnam" in Somalia, the large single-day casualties to American troops there have raised the heat on President Clinton to demonstrate that he has the capability to deal with a crisis in the foreign-policy field in which he has virtually no experience.Doubts in this regard were only intensified by the dispatch of Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Secretary of Defense Les Aspin to brief more than 200 members of Congress about administration policy in Somalia.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 4, 2005
Philadelphia -- Let me get this straight. The Naval Academy wants you to believe that a few West Point exchange students were able to break into Ricketts Hall and steal the Commander in Chief's Trophy right out from under the combined noses of the Academy's U.S. Marine security detail and the Secret Service. If you watched the 106th Army-Navy football game, you could see for yourself that such a scenario is ridiculous. There were, what, 70 of the biggest, baddest members of the West Point corps of cadets on the gridiron at Lincoln Financial Field yesterday and the trophy was sitting right there on a table at the 50-yard line ... and they didn't get close enough to see their reflections in it. The Black Knights were supposed to show up with some momentum after running up a four-game winning streak that included the victory over Air Force that put the trophy up for grabs yesterday, but the Midshipmen ran over and around them until there was no doubt who remained the dominant service academy football program.
NEWS
May 31, 1996
THE PRESIDENT who smoked pot but didn't inhale is the same president who cited but now says he was not relying on his military status as commander-in-chief to delay a civil suit brought by a woman who charges he propositioned her.Embarrassing? You bet. Politically damaging? You better believe it. Nonetheless, is Bill Clinton correct in seeking constitutional immunity from being bandied "from pillar to post" (Thomas Jefferson's words) by suits that distract him from his duties? Absolutely.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2005
The Navy football team will know its postseason destination soon, but it already knows where its immediate focus should be. Army is on the horizon in less than two weeks, and the bowl opponent will have to wait to get the attention of the Midshipmen. The Commander in Chief's Trophy is in the balance. If the minds of the players wander, the coaching staff will certainly snap them to attention. "It's a big, big game," coach Paul Johnson said yesterday of the 106th meeting with the Black Knights on Dec. 3 in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 16, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's whirlwind trip to Bosnia was a well-timed show of his authority as commander-in-chief. Many Americans may harbor doubts about his commitment of 20,000 U.S. troops to that war-scarred Balkan nation, but there should ,, be no doubt about his constitutional power to do so. Even a hostile Republican-controlled Congress has been relatively acquiescent.For Mr. Clinton, the friendly welcome he received from G.I.s in Tuzla, headquarters of the American sector, came as an election-year bonanza.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
On the bright side of another bitter loss to Notre Dame is the fact that Navy still has so much at stake. Winning in South Bend over the Fighting Irish would have added a magical memory to Navy's football resurrection. But even after losing to them for the 40th consecutive year, even after losing on a last-second, 40-yard field goal that completed Notre Dame's second straight fourth-quarter escape over the Midshipmen, Navy has plenty of reasons to move on with a purpose. The Mids (6-4)
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 2005
He just closed his eyes and thought of Bill Clinton. That's how Kyle Secor, the boyishly good looking, 48-year-old co-star of ABC's hit series Commander in Chief, describes his method in developing the role of Rod Calloway, husband of the first female president of the United States. "I got some books on first ladies, because I really didn't know much about the position, and that is basically what I would be taking over. I read about Dolley Madison and Jackie Kennedy, but I still couldn't feel it," the actor says.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 14, 2013
The latest open debate over security and privacy is a welcome pivot from the irksome father-knows-best attitude that has prevailed too long regarding the government's contention of superior judgment in the realm of national security. As with most cases of governmental excess in the shadow world of intelligence, the attitude goes a long way back in American history. It can be traced at least to the Alien and Sedition Acts under John Adams, and Abraham Lincoln's suppression of the habeas corpus protection that trampled civil liberties in the young nation and then in the Civil War. Later, there was Lyndon Johnson's defense of expanding the American military role in Vietnam based on the supposedly superior intelligence he possessed, and then Richard Nixon's arrogant contention that if the president of the United States did something, that automatically made it not only right but legal.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Rarely, if ever, will a game between a team with a modest 7-4 record and its 2-9 opponent be as meaningful as the one scheduled to play here at Lincoln Financial Field on Dec. 8. Then again, this year's meeting between Navy and Army has more at stake than usual. It marks the first time since 2005 that the Commander in Chief's Trophy — given to the winner of the round robin played out among the nation's service academies — will be handed to the team that emerges victorious from this iconic rivalry.
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