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Commander In Chief

NEWS
April 3, 2005
AT THE END of the first war with Iraq, in 1991, American intelligence agencies were caught by surprise when it became clear just how close Saddam Hussein was to developing a nuclear weapon. Understandably, they weren't going to make that mistake again, so when the idea took hold that the Iraqi dictator was once more pursuing weapons of mass destruction in the early years of this decade, who would have been so foolish as to downplay the threat? Virtually the entire intelligence community jumped over the cliff together on that one, and now a commission named by President Bush has helpfully pointed out that they were all "dead wrong."
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NEWS
By George F. Will | December 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- There may be sound reasons for not removing President Clinton, but Sen. Pat Moynihan's reason is not among them. Indeed, Mr. Moynihan's enunciation of it becomes a reason for removing Mr. Clinton. Otherwise, retaining Mr. Clinton may seem to ratify Mr. Moynihan's reasoning, which is unjust to the nation.Identifying Mr. Moynihan as the Senate's pre-eminent intellectual akin to identifying Iowa's tallest mountain -- faint praise for the finest senator of his generation.When Mr. Moynihan leaves the Senate in 2000, public life will lose (in the words of Michael Barone, author of "The Almanac of American Politics")
NEWS
July 5, 1999
Adm. Isaac Campbell Kidd Jr., 79, who topped off a 40-year Navy career by becoming an authority on the law of the sea, died of prostate cancer June 27 at his home in Alexandria, Va.He retired in 1978 as commander in chief of the Atlantic Fleet and supreme commander of NATO forces in the Atlantic. He then put his expertise to work for various public agencies in Washington, lectured widely on maritime law in the United States and abroad and taught a course on the subject at the College of William and Mary.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 31, 1994
TWENTIETH-CENTURY history is tragically replete with examples of nations that became disenchanted with the perfidy of civilian politics and imagined only the military could get things done, could act with patriotic disinterest.Are we experiencing one?Politicians are despised, Congress reviled, the presidency embattled.Running against big government, big spending and bureaucracy the new coin of politics.Yet the largest and most expensive component of government, the hugest of its bureaucracies, the armed forces, enjoys an opposite level of trust, popularity and influence suggesting certain unhappy periods in the history of, say, Argentina.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2005
Philadelphia -- All the pomp, pageantry and tradition that make the Army-Navy game unique will be on prominent display again today when the military academy rivals clash in their 106th meeting at Lincoln Financial Field. But to the opposing football teams, it's primarily about capturing the hardware and resultant bragging rights for servicemen and women throughout the world. For the first time in nine years, the coveted Commander in Chief's Trophy will be the spoil that goes to the winner, adding vital significance to a game that always stands as the most important of the year for the Black Knights and Midshipmen.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Lord Fieldhouse, commander of the British battle fleet that sailed to retake the Falkland Islands from Argentine forces 10 years ago, died in a London hospital Monday at the age of 63. As Adm. Sir John Fieldhouse, he was commander in chief, fleet, during the 1982 Falklands campaign. He earlier commanded Britain's first nuclear submarine, Dreadnought, and eventually rose to become chief of the defense staff.James H. McBath, 69, who moderated a nationally televised debate program, NBC's weekly "Championship Debate," in the 1960s, died Jan. 23 of a heart attack in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Condemning President Bush's military leadership, Sen. John Kerry outlined a plan yesterday that he said would modernize the military and bring new benefits to soldiers and veterans, even as he fended off Republican charges that he is unfit to be commander in chief. "We are still bogged down in Iraq, and the administration stubbornly holds to failed unilateral policies that drive potential, significant, important, long-standing allies away from us," Kerry said in a speech at George Washington University on the eve of the one-year anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush's campaign is unleashing a direct and meticulously planned assault on John Kerry's national security credentials this week with a nearly $10 million advertising drive intended to undermine what both sides describe as Kerry's potentially greatest asset. The tough television attack advertisements, combined with a speech Vice President Dick Cheney will deliver in Missouri tomorrow, reflect what both sides see as an increasingly critical question: whether Kerry can persuade Americans that he would be a strong enough president in a time of war. The advertisements will begin tomorrow night and will be broadcast on stations in nine states and on some national cable networks.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - If fertile ground ever existed for the possibility of a classic upset, it lies on the surface of Lincoln Financial Field. Army and Navy - going in opposite directions in their football programs - meet for the 104th renewal of their classic rivalry Dec. 6 with everything to gain, but for different reasons. Navy has a lot to lose, particularly sole possession of the Commander in Chief's Trophy for the first time since 1981, an 8-4 record (the academy's best since 1996) and a potential appearance in a postseason game.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 20, 2006
CHICAGO -- Sen. Russ Feingold, a Wisconsin Democrat, thinks President Bush broke the law with his secret program to eavesdrop on Americans, and he wants Congress to censure Mr. Bush. He's right about the lawbreaking but wrong to think censure is the answer. That might give Americans the impression that Congress is something more than a supine slave of partisan interests. Nothing could be further from the truth. Republicans on Capitol Hill, presented with the censure resolution, practically trampled each other to prove their slobbering devotion to the president.
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