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Commander In Chief

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - The overwhelming congressional support voted for President Bush on the war - by 392-11 in the House and 99-0 in the Senate - is a measure of the recognition that once American forces go into combat, Congress has no alternative but to close ranks behind them, and him. But the debates that ensued over the wording of the latest war resolutions revealed continuing strong doubts, especially among Democrats, about Mr. Bush's political wisdom and...
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 14, 2013
The latest open debate over security and privacy is a welcome pivot from the irksome father-knows-best attitude that has prevailed too long regarding the government's contention of superior judgment in the realm of national security. As with most cases of governmental excess in the shadow world of intelligence, the attitude goes a long way back in American history. It can be traced at least to the Alien and Sedition Acts under John Adams, and Abraham Lincoln's suppression of the habeas corpus protection that trampled civil liberties in the young nation and then in the Civil War. Later, there was Lyndon Johnson's defense of expanding the American military role in Vietnam based on the supposedly superior intelligence he possessed, and then Richard Nixon's arrogant contention that if the president of the United States did something, that automatically made it not only right but legal.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton may not have served in the armed forces, but he has been commander in chief for two years now and has learned how to handle an insubordinate Marine.The presidential put-down came at the expense of Oliver L. North, the former Marine colonel and Iran-contra figure who is the Republican candidate for a U.S. Senate seat in Virginia.Mr. North asserted recently that Mr. Clinton had offered former Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder an ambassadorship in return for Mr. Wilder's endorsement of incumbent Democrat Sen. Charles S. Robb.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
President Barack Obama awarded Navy's football team with the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy on Thursday afternoon in the East Room at the White House. Here are the president's remarks: Hello, everybody.  (Applause.)  Hello.  Please, everybody have a seat.  Well, good afternoon.  Welcome to the White House.  I want to start by recognizing Coach Ken Niumatalolo, my fellow Hawaiian, for being here once again -- where is he?  There he is right here.  (Laughter.)  Hard to miss him.  Give him a big round of applause.  (Applause.)
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The last time we looked, President Clinton was still the commander in chief. But the president has played no role in the controversy over adultery in the military except to issue a statement praising Gen. Joseph W. Ralston after he walked the plank.It may have been unrealistic to expect any president to interject himself into the situation, even though he is the one who will nominate the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and he is the one with the ultimate responsibility for any unfairness in the treatment of General Ralston or the commanding officer of the Aberdeen Proving Ground or Lt. Kelly Flinn.
NEWS
By JIM WRIGHT and JIM WRIGHT,Compiled by Knight-Ridder News Service | June 11, 1995
As Bosnia heats up, we see more proof that what goes around does eventually come around. For our nation's president and, unfortunately, also the armed forces.In every one of these services, from the NCO schools for the youngest corporals to the command-and-staff schools for the officers of flag rank, the first law of leadership is laid down early and often:Never ask your people to do anything you would not be willing to do, to take any risk you would not take yourself.The present commander in chief, sad to say, does that every time his orders put any American soldier, sailor, airman or Marine in harm's way. It is the main reason he is held in such low regard throughout the armed services, why he is morally crippled in any attempt to lead them.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 25, 2005
THERE IS A NEW WOMAN ON television this fall. Defined more by intellect and competence than by physical beauty or her relationship to men, she belies depictions of women that have dominated prime-time television for more than 50 years. In several of the new fall programs, including ABC's Commander in Chief or Fox's Bones, the New Woman can be found in the Oval Office and the most rarefied realms of science and math, places few female characters have gone before. Yet, this empowered New Woman owes her existence in part to five inarguably sexy suburban housewives living on a TV cul-de-sac called Wisteria Lane, the five neighbors of ABC's Desperate Housewives.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | October 15, 1995
50 years ago The brigade of midshipmen from the Naval Academy will join in welcoming a 1905 alumnus from the Pacific when Fleet Commander Chester W. Nimitz, commander in chief of the Pacific fleet, returns to Washington. The mids will serve as an honor guard at the Capitol. -- The Sun, Oct. 4, 1945.The separation center at Fort George G. Meade has discharged its 50,000th serviceman, Tech 4/g George H. Smith of Greensboro. -- The Sun, Oct. 21, 1945.
NEWS
By Robert M.Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | September 18, 1994
50 Years Ago* Navy defeated Penn State at Annapolis in football by a score of 55-14, the most points registered by either team in their long football series. -- The Sun, Oct. 8, 1944.* Governor O'Conor announced that so far 22,727 absentee ballots have been received at the State House in Annapolis from Maryland servicemen and women serving in all parts of the world. Some 848 ballots are registered from Anne Arundel County. -- The Sun, Oct. 16, 1944.* Rear Admiral L. D. McCormick of Annapolis was decorated with the Legion of Merit and Capt.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | February 10, 2002
Yeah, so maybe she's tiny enough to shop at GAP Kids. And true, she's got enough sass to give figure skating's top brass a bundle of nightmares. But is there any Olympian as cool as Sasha Cohen? Doubtful. After all, Friday night, there she was, grinning away on a cold Utah night, handing President Bush her cell phone -- in the middle of the opening ceremony, no less! -- asking if he wanted to chat with her mom. She even shared a smirk with the Commander in Chief in the process. It's really no surprise.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Rarely, if ever, will a game between a team with a modest 7-4 record and its 2-9 opponent be as meaningful as the one scheduled to play here at Lincoln Financial Field on Dec. 8. Then again, this year's meeting between Navy and Army has more at stake than usual. It marks the first time since 2005 that the Commander in Chief's Trophy — given to the winner of the round robin played out among the nation's service academies — will be handed to the team that emerges victorious from this iconic rivalry.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
In describing the emotions that will accompany his players onto the field Saturday when they play Air Force at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, Navy coach Ken Niumatalo joked at this week's luncheon that the Midshipmen get so excited for the Falcons that "they forget their parents' names. " Air Force quarterback Tim Jefferson, whose two-touchdown heroics last season in Colorado Springs, Colo., helped end Navy's seven-game winning streak over the Falcons and a 15-game service academy winning streak with a 14-6 victory, said this week that "your adrenaline never leaves you, you're always jacked up throughout the game.
NEWS
May 7, 2011
President Obama chose the time, method, and strategy for addressing the terrorist threat posed by Osama bin Laden. He was responsible for the decision, and he was accountable for the results. No matter what point of view you might hold, this president must be credited for effective leadership and management as a commander-in-chief, consoler-in-chief, comedian-in-chief and educator-in-chief. Very few individuals could deal with a weather-related catastrophic situation on Friday morning, provide an inspirational speech at a college commencement on Friday afternoon, attend and actively participate in a formal White House Correspondent's dinner on Saturday evening, play golf on Sunday morning and all the while manage a major event impacting the safety of civilized society by Sunday night.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | October 1, 2010
Normally on display in the rotunda of the Naval Academy's Bancroft Hall, the Commander in Chief's Trophy this week rested smack dab in the center of the football team's locker room. Conspicuous placement of the hardware — presented annually to the service academy with the best head-to-head record among the three — was at the top of coach Ken Niumatalolo's motivational checklist in advance of the Midshipmen's game at Air Force on Saturday. It also was a rare instance this decade in which the trophy changed locations.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
As he prepared to resign his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Gen. George Washington traveled to Annapolis and while staying at Mann's Tavern, put his thoughts on paper. His Dec. 23, 1783 address to Congress, which was then meeting in the Old Senate Chamber in what is today the State House, concluded with a farewell to public life. Preparing to resign his commission as the Continental Army's commander in chief, Gen. George Washington put his thoughts on paper while staying at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | July 31, 2007
Navy fullback Adam Ballard echoed the sentiments of every senior on the Midshipmen football team yesterday when he said: "We don't want to be the ones to lower the bar." Navy, you see, has started a tradition - a four-year tradition now - of winning seasons, going to bowl games and being the winner of the Commander in Chief's Trophy that goes to the team winning the series among the three service academies. "The thinking here has changed a lot since my freshman year," senior center Antron Harper said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 27, 2005
Hail to the chief -- Commander in Chief that is, the new ABC series starring Academy Award-winner Geena Davis as the first female president of the United States. As drama, tonight's pilot has its flaws, but it is, nevertheless, one of those electrifying TV productions that instead of simply seeking to divert or amuse, challenges viewers to imagine a reality other than the one they have been conditioned to accept. For all the talk of television "dumbing down" its audience, such programs have the capacity to do exactly the opposite as they create a different vision of American life and invite millions of viewers to spend an hour exploring that new reality each week.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | July 31, 2007
Navy fullback Adam Ballard echoed the sentiments of every senior on the Midshipmen football team yesterday when he said: "We don't want to be the ones to lower the bar." Navy, you see, has started a tradition - a four-year tradition now - of winning seasons, going to bowl games and being the winner of the Commander in Chief's Trophy that goes to the team winning the series among the three service academies. "The thinking here has changed a lot since my freshman year," senior center Antron Harper said.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 12, 2006
BOSTON -- Remember when we were told that a woman who wanted the top job had to be twice as good as a man? The first woman in any post would be inspected with a microscope and dismissed for the smallest flaw. Now the first female president of United States of Television has failed to get a second term, excuse me, a second season, because she was too good to be true. Is this progress? Or is it yet another double bind? This week is the last episode of Commander in Chief. Geena Davis' star turn as the first female president was heralded as a breakthrough last fall.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 20, 2006
CHICAGO -- Sen. Russ Feingold, a Wisconsin Democrat, thinks President Bush broke the law with his secret program to eavesdrop on Americans, and he wants Congress to censure Mr. Bush. He's right about the lawbreaking but wrong to think censure is the answer. That might give Americans the impression that Congress is something more than a supine slave of partisan interests. Nothing could be further from the truth. Republicans on Capitol Hill, presented with the censure resolution, practically trampled each other to prove their slobbering devotion to the president.
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