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By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland correspondent for The Sun | October 21, 1990
I was 5 years old when they tore down Ebbets Field, home of the departed Brooklyn Dodgers. I have a vague memory of being there when I was 4. I wish it were more vivid.I also have a vague memory of the stadium disappearing piece by piece, the wrecking ball smashing a place where 20th century American history, not just baseball, unfolded. I am grateful that memory is cloudy.Next year, some people in Chicago will revel in their new stadium, their new Comiskey Park, now under construction. These days, most Chicago White Sox fans are united in their support of days to come in the new stadium.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- He was almost 13 when he saw his first Major League game, although he had been a fan since he was a little fella. For years, he had stayed up past his bedtime, listening to the West Coast games with his father in the backyard, where the radio reception was clearest. He had even been to Cooperstown, but they wouldn't let him in at the Baseball Hall of Fame. Prejudice, and not for the first time.Then, thanks to the Chicago White Sox -- not his father's team, the Yankees, nor his hometown team, the Orioles -- he entered a ballpark for the first time, ate his first ballpark hot dog and roasted peanuts, saw his first pitch.
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SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | April 8, 1991
When the White Sox worked out at Memorial Stadium yesterday they were visited by an old friend and adversary, Hall of Famer Jim Palmer.Somebody asked the ex-Orioles pitcher how the O's are going to be this year."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 19, 1994
ARLINGTON, Texas -- You don't expect to come across a sure-fire piece of Baltimore out here in the suburban flatlands between Dallas and Fort Worth, but there it is, raising up majestically out of a parking lot next to an amusement park, just off an interstate highway headed straight for the big country of West Texas: Camden Yards, the Sequel.Welcome home, pardner.It's a shiny new ballpark made of red brick, green steel, high archways and iron railings, with green seats, an asymmetrical playing field, quirks borrowed from famous stadiums and a distinctive old-time feel.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | January 26, 1992
The moment that Baltimore Orioles fans have been waiting for arrives April 6, at 3:05 p.m. Barring the unthinkable -- rain, snow, an unfinished ballpark -- the first regular-season pitch at the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards will be tossed just then.Thrilling as that opening pitch may be, it's not the only baseball-flavored event scheduled for the month of April. Wednesday, Orioles and city and state officials led by Gov. William Donald Schaefer are expected to formally announce a full plate of "Opening Week" activities for the days leading up to the opening game.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 19, 1994
ARLINGTON, Texas -- You don't expect to come across a sure-fire piece of Baltimore out here in the suburban flatlands between Dallas and Fort Worth, but there it is, raising up majestically out of a parking lot next to an amusement park, just off an interstate highway headed straight for the big country of West Texas: Camden Yards, the Sequel.Welcome home, pardner.It's a shiny new ballpark made of red brick, green steel, high archways and iron railings, with green seats, an asymmetrical playing field, quirks borrowed from famous stadiums and a distinctive old-time feel.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 19, 1991
CHICAGO -- He peeked into luxury suites, strolled crowded concourses and, of all things, looked in at the press box.He wanted to know about the seating capacity. He asked why the upper deck had such a pronounced slant. Politely, he inquired why the elevators arrived late or not at all.He watched a couple of innings of the ballgame and even answered the burning question, what does Gov. William Donald Schaefer eat for lunch at a baseball game?(Answer: a hot dog and a giant soft pretzel.)But there was another question to be asked yesterday afternoon:What was Maryland's governor doing at the grand opening of the Comiskey Park, the new $135 million home of the Chicago White Sox?
SPORTS
By Blair Kamin and Blair Kamin,Chicago Tribune | June 30, 1991
CHICAGO -- New Comiskey Park is big and brawny, like many of the highly paid players who play in it. But will this building ever be beloved?Don't bet on it.Sure, the Chicago White Sox are the second-best draw this year in the American League (the Toronto Blue Jays rank first). And, yes, Comiskey has an exploding scoreboard, handsome arches and other trappings designed to make it a new-age park with old-time charm.But wait until the novelty wears off. And wait 'til next year, when the new Camden Yards ballpark opens in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 23, 1991
CHICAGO -- The suit, that's what everyone asks about. Roland Hemond wore it the day the Chicago White Sox clinched the AL West title in 1983. It became a champagne-drenched symbol, and the club displayed it in a glass-enclosed case outside the press dining room in the old Comiskey Park.Now Hemond is making his first visit to the new Comiskey, and the suit is nowhere in sight. "They haven't found it yet," the Orioles' general manager says, chuckling. "It hasn't been unpacked. Maybe it's over there being demolished."
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- He was almost 13 when he saw his first Major League game, although he had been a fan since he was a little fella. For years, he had stayed up past his bedtime, listening to the West Coast games with his father in the backyard, where the radio reception was clearest. He had even been to Cooperstown, but they wouldn't let him in at the Baseball Hall of Fame. Prejudice, and not for the first time.Then, thanks to the Chicago White Sox -- not his father's team, the Yankees, nor his hometown team, the Orioles -- he entered a ballpark for the first time, ate his first ballpark hot dog and roasted peanuts, saw his first pitch.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | January 26, 1992
The moment that Baltimore Orioles fans have been waiting for arrives April 6, at 3:05 p.m. Barring the unthinkable -- rain, snow, an unfinished ballpark -- the first regular-season pitch at the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards will be tossed just then.Thrilling as that opening pitch may be, it's not the only baseball-flavored event scheduled for the month of April. Wednesday, Orioles and city and state officials led by Gov. William Donald Schaefer are expected to formally announce a full plate of "Opening Week" activities for the days leading up to the opening game.
SPORTS
By Blair Kamin and Blair Kamin,Chicago Tribune | June 30, 1991
CHICAGO -- New Comiskey Park is big and brawny, like many of the highly paid players who play in it. But will this building ever be beloved?Don't bet on it.Sure, the Chicago White Sox are the second-best draw this year in the American League (the Toronto Blue Jays rank first). And, yes, Comiskey has an exploding scoreboard, handsome arches and other trappings designed to make it a new-age park with old-time charm.But wait until the novelty wears off. And wait 'til next year, when the new Camden Yards ballpark opens in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 23, 1991
CHICAGO -- The suit, that's what everyone asks about. Roland Hemond wore it the day the Chicago White Sox clinched the AL West title in 1983. It became a champagne-drenched symbol, and the club displayed it in a glass-enclosed case outside the press dining room in the old Comiskey Park.Now Hemond is making his first visit to the new Comiskey, and the suit is nowhere in sight. "They haven't found it yet," the Orioles' general manager says, chuckling. "It hasn't been unpacked. Maybe it's over there being demolished."
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 19, 1991
CHICAGO -- He peeked into luxury suites, strolled crowded concourses and, of all things, looked in at the press box.He wanted to know about the seating capacity. He asked why the upper deck had such a pronounced slant. Politely, he inquired why the elevators arrived late or not at all.He watched a couple of innings of the ballgame and even answered the burning question, what does Gov. William Donald Schaefer eat for lunch at a baseball game?(Answer: a hot dog and a giant soft pretzel.)But there was another question to be asked yesterday afternoon:What was Maryland's governor doing at the grand opening of the Comiskey Park, the new $135 million home of the Chicago White Sox?
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | April 8, 1991
When the White Sox worked out at Memorial Stadium yesterday they were visited by an old friend and adversary, Hall of Famer Jim Palmer.Somebody asked the ex-Orioles pitcher how the O's are going to be this year."
FEATURES
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland correspondent for The Sun | October 21, 1990
I was 5 years old when they tore down Ebbets Field, home of the departed Brooklyn Dodgers. I have a vague memory of being there when I was 4. I wish it were more vivid.I also have a vague memory of the stadium disappearing piece by piece, the wrecking ball smashing a place where 20th century American history, not just baseball, unfolded. I am grateful that memory is cloudy.Next year, some people in Chicago will revel in their new stadium, their new Comiskey Park, now under construction. These days, most Chicago White Sox fans are united in their support of days to come in the new stadium.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | May 28, 1994
CHICAGO -- She sat in Suite No. 450 at Comiskey Park, her 2-year-old son munching a hot dog, her 2-month-old daughter letting out an occasional cry.Now came the true test for Frank Thomas' wife.All right, Elise, White Sox or Orioles?The question might seem ridiculous, considering that her husband is one of the biggest sports heroes in Chicago, with a contract that could keep him in a White Sox uniform through the year 2000.But let's talk roots.Elise Thomas is formerly a Silver, a Rochester Silver, a Rochester Red Wings Silver.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998
Astros: Craig Biggio stole three bases to give him 291 in his career, moving him ahead of coach Jose Cruz Sr. for second place on Houston's all-time list. Cesar Cedeno is first with 487.Cardinals: Mark McGwire hit his eighth homer at new Comiskey Park. He had hit four at old Comiskey Park.Indians: Attendance was 43,068, the 238th straight sellout at Jacobs Field.Pub Date: 6/09/98
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