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By Laura Lefavor, For The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Facebook may have a lot of uses for social networking and time-wasting, but lately it's been offering a creative outlet, too. A new comic-making application called Bitstrips is popping up more and more on Facebook updates. And after just a few months, Bitstrips has turned into something that everyone seems to be talking about. "Basically, it's an app that turns you and your friends into a cast of cartoon characters," explains Jacob Blackstock, Bitstrips' chief executive and creative director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
If it's true that a society is known by its most popular artifacts, we are becoming a culture of comic books and games. Our biggest film and TV characters are based on comic book super heroes and villains, while our real life heroes are professional athletes. Watching tonight's premiere of “Gotham,” I couldn't help feeling that if there was any new series that would probably crack Nielsen's Top 10 this fall alongside all the different primetime NFL games and pre-game shows, it would be this one from Fox. You tell me if that's a good or bad thing.
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NEWS
January 17, 2009
The Sunday TV Week and comics have been combined into one section. The new TV & Comics section features color-coded grids for movies, sports and news, and we have brought back the old crossword puzzle that readers said they preferred. The Sunday Doonesbury comic strip appears in the Maryland Closeup section on pages 2 and 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
I hope those who know Joan Rivers only from her work the last couple of decades on shows like “Fashion Police” will take the time to read some of the appreciations that talk about who she used to be. Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81 after being on life support since Aug. 28, was a fearless, cutting-edge and transgressive comedian straight from Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s, who made it possible for the likes of Amy Schumer and...
NEWS
September 16, 2011
Really? According to The Sun, Social Security is a successful, financially solvent, program that isn't in any real danger ("Social Security sets off sparks," Sept. 13)! Where does The Sun get it's non-facts, from the latest fiction book on the New York Times best seller list? The statement that the government is only using the Social Security trust fund "surplus" to pay for other government programs is laughable at best. Now I don't have to turn to the comic section. That was the best laugh of the day. Gail Householder, Marriottsville
FEATURES
October 23, 1990
AND NOW, A little funny business.Accent, in conjunction with SUNDIAL, the free telephone information service of The Baltimore Sun, is conducting an electronic survey this week to determine which Evening Sun comics you like -- or dislike -- most.To register your opinions, call 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County) any time until midnight Sunday.After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your touch-tone phone. Punch 6300 and you'll be connected with a voice that will lead you through the survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 11, 2011
You might know and love Flannery O'Connor as the legendary author of short fiction. (She's this humble correspondent's favorite short story writer -- mainly because could take the mundane motions of southern life and skew them into something dark and twisted.)   But did you know that O'Connor also drew weird, counter-culture cartoons?  Apparently, before she forever our consciousness with "A Good Man is Hard to Find," O'Connor was seriously pursuing a career as a cartoonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
McDaniel College is opening the doors of its Englar Dining Hall to the public on select Sundays for a Sunday Brunch on the Hill in conjunction with the its exhibition on newspaper comic strips. The brunch buffet will feature live music and free Sunday comics from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays, Oct. 23 and Nov. 13. The cost for  brunch buffet with complimentary mimosas and Bloody Marys is $10. The exhibiton, Kings of the Pages: Comic Strips & Culture 1895-1950 , will be open to the public 11:30 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. on these two Sundays.
NEWS
By Benn Ray benn@atomicbooks.com | May 6, 2014
The first Saturday in May is traditionally one of the biggest days for events of the year, and Saturday, May 3 is no exception First, it's Free Comic Book Day. That means comic shops all over the country have about 50 different free comics that they're giving away. Here in Hampden, my shop, Atomic Books, 3620 Falls Road, will start giving away comics as soon as the doors open at 11 a.m.. And it's a variety of titles from The Simpsons to Archie to Hello Kitty to Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy to DC's Teen Titans.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Over the next three days, a few hundred thousand Americans are expected to show up at theaters for the premiere weekend of Iron Man, based on the Marvel Comics character. If only the country's 3,000 comics stores could entice even a small percentage of them into their shops. "There might be a few people who come in for their kids, but it won't be as many people as you'd think, as far as the person who's not into comics," says John "Bumper" Moyer, owner of Glen Burnie's Twilite Zone Comics.
HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | August 12, 2014
They were called "round-robins" - a way of dividing up the stars of the new television season and the hundred or so critics who had come to Los Angeles to interview them. Instead of one unwieldy gathering, the critics divided into three groups and the stars rotated through. Maybe stars isn't the right word. These were actors on shows that had yet to air who hoped to become stars. The year was 1978, and I was the new TV critic for The Evening Sun on my first West Coast network tour, a biannual event.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 16, 2014
Riverdale High's red-headed heart throb, Archie Andrews, died this week. He took a bullet for his gay best friend, who was speaking out against gun violence. Betty and Veronica were there in the last frames of the comic book to cradle him in death. No bobby socks and soda shops in this issue, that's for sure. The teens we all wanted to be before we were old enough to be teens are dealing with grown-up issues and the tragedy of death. Ugh. It's enough to make you wish you were 10 again, reading a brand-new edition of your favorite comic book and sipping a Coke out of a bottle on a hot summer afternoon.
NEWS
By Benn Ray benn@atomicbooks.com | May 6, 2014
The first Saturday in May is traditionally one of the biggest days for events of the year, and Saturday, May 3 is no exception First, it's Free Comic Book Day. That means comic shops all over the country have about 50 different free comics that they're giving away. Here in Hampden, my shop, Atomic Books, 3620 Falls Road, will start giving away comics as soon as the doors open at 11 a.m.. And it's a variety of titles from The Simpsons to Archie to Hello Kitty to Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy to DC's Teen Titans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Richards | January 28, 2014
There's a scene in the first episode of the new web series "BFA" that quickly tells you this isn't another navel-gazer about life as a 20-something in New York or Los Angeles. Our protagonists, a group of Baltimore actors who make up the fictional Stick People Theatre Company, have just put on an edgy performance in their partially renovated rowhouse. The audience - five lonely souls - is told afterward by emcee Sarah Pearl (played by 23-year-old Katie Hileman) that cupcakes and beer are available as refreshments.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
Super heroes, zombies and even some "Dr. Whos" invaded the Aberdeen library for the annual Mini Comic-Con. In its third year, the event continues to grow in popularity with increased participation and stellar presenters. Nearly 250 youth participated in the two-day event. Presenters included make-up artist Sherry Billings, who gave lessons on how to achieve that zombie deadly look that is all the rage. Warren Capps of Breakaway Games explained the gaming business. Comic Book writer Steve Ogden demonstrated how to draw iconic characters.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Peter Kuper has nothing against superheroes, funny animals and maligned office workers. Except when that's all people know about the comics. "For most people, it's like a tossup between Dilbert, Garfield and Superman - that is the broad perception today of what comics are," says Kuper, a cartoonist, graphic novelist and comic artist whose work is far afield from such populist touchstones. "You are constantly shaking off that stigma." At 46, Kuper is among a bevy of comic artists trying to stretch the boundaries of what are popularly perceived as the medium's limitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Doug Gansler's truly bad day of TV optics started Thursday with a Sun story and accompanying picture off Instagram of a beach party the attorney general attended in Delaware. By 9 a.m., the cable channels were running with the picture and the story -- and it went that way on the hour throughout the day straight through the network evening newscasts and prime-time cable. And then, the story was picked up by late-night comedians. Here's what Jay Leno had to say on the "Tonight" show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
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