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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 18, 1993
That 17-year-old Lawrence Poirier tells his parents he is ga probably isn't a very big deal. Thousands of teen-agers somehow find the courage to do the same thing every day.What's unusual about Lawrence is that he's a character in a comic strip, "For Better or for Worse."Starting April 5, the comic strip, which appears in The Sun, will take on the touchy issue of gay teens coming out to their parents. The reaction of Lawrence's parents is unfortunately typical. They throw him out of the house.
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NEWS
March 22, 2012
Readers such as John Rutkowski must not understand that Garry Trudeau's series on the forced ultra-sound law for women seeking abortion is no attempt at being funny ("Idiotic 'Doonesbury' strip on abortion insults readers," March 20). "Comic" strip is a misnomer for Doonesbury, which is why The Sun runs the strip on the op-ed page and not the "funnies" pages. I must also take issue with the series being a jab at all those with "some" morals and religious convictions. Apparently, those who don't feel the jab are totally lacking morals and religious scruples.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1998
NEW ORLEANS -- Comic Strip joined stablemate Lil's Lad as a major Kentucky Derby contender yesterday by winning the $500,000 Louisiana Derby in a dramatic last-to-first dash at the Fair Grounds.Shane Sellers rode the laid-back Red Ransom colt, the 9-5 favorite, to a nose triumph over 34-1 long shot Nite Dreamer. Twenty-four hours earlier at Gulfstream Park, Sellers rode Cape Town in the Florida Derby to a stirring victory -- by disqualification -- over Lil's Lad.That's two wins for Sellers, but a split decision for Neil Howard, who trains Comic Strip and Lil's Lad.After the Florida Derby, in one of those quirky coincidences particular to horse racing, Sellers and Howard -- on opposite teams hours before -- boarded a plane together for the flight to New Orleans and partnership with Comic Strip.
NEWS
February 11, 2012
I got two great belly laughs from Doonesbury this week. Gary Trudeau is amazingly talented - on the mark, clever, perceptive and fearless. I hope you will never stop featuring his commentary/comic strip in The Sun. It's one of the reasons I continue to subscribe. At 79, I have been subscribing to The Sun for 56 years, and I don't want to be tempted to cancel my subscription. Judith Hundertmark, Cockeysville
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Baltimore-born Donna A. Lewis is a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security who moonlights as a stripper. A comic stripper. Her semi-autobiographical strip, "Reply All," about a successful career woman struggling with self-doubt, has just been syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group. It debuts Monday in about a dozen newspapers nationwide, including The Post, Boston Globe and Charlotte Observer. While the strip is based loosely on Lewis' life, you won't see any "Dilbert"-style references to her day job. And not just because, as her bio on http://www.replyallcomic.com deadpans, "Donna is not funny or interesting at all by day. " Homeland Security has given her the OK to write the comic strip in her spare time, with the caveat that she must steer clear of anything related to her work for the department's Office of General Counsel.
FEATURES
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 1996
DUBLIN, Calif. -- We are approaching Nerdvana, as Dogbert would say. Scott Adams climbs the stairs into his study, the hub of a thriving revenge-of-the-nerds empire.It is here, in an office just slightly bigger than a cubicle, that Mr. Adams transforms tales of idiotic bosses and meaningless empowerment teams into humor, and thus into the life of Dilbert, the chinless comic-strip hero to millions of cubicle-confined workers.Powerless, socially awkward, doomed to work for inept superiors, Dilbert the overweight engineer slogs through corporate life in the '90s.
NEWS
February 11, 2012
I got two great belly laughs from Doonesbury this week. Gary Trudeau is amazingly talented - on the mark, clever, perceptive and fearless. I hope you will never stop featuring his commentary/comic strip in The Sun. It's one of the reasons I continue to subscribe. At 79, I have been subscribing to The Sun for 56 years, and I don't want to be tempted to cancel my subscription. Judith Hundertmark, Cockeysville
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 4, 1998
If you read "For Better or For Worse," you've seen it coming. The comic strip known for taking on such tough family issues as child beating and teen-age homosexuality is heading toward another painful theme: the death of an elderly parent.Elly Patterson's mother passes away in today's strip. The subject hit home for creator Lynn Johnston, whose parents died about eight years ago. United Feature Syndicate passed along these comments from Johnston:"It was a challenge to revisit all those emotions, but I wanted the challenge because it gave me a chance to put some unresolved issues to rest and to rewrite some things I didn't like about how it happened in my life.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
SHELDON DORF, 76 Comic-Con founder Sheldon Dorf, who founded the Comic-Con International comic book convention, died in San Diego on Tuesday. A longtime friend, Greg Koudoulian, said the Ocean Beach, Calif., resident died at a hospital of kidney failure. He had diabetes and had been hospitalized for about a year. Mr. Dorf, a freelance artist and comic-strip letterer, founded Comic-Con in San Diego in 1970 after moving from Detroit. The convention now draws 125,000 fans a year and is a major gathering for comic-book fans, artists, writers and movie stars.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | July 6, 1993
WashingtonCartoonist Nicole Hollander's mouthpiece "Sylvia" simply can't stop giving advice. Mostly at home in a bathtub that doubles as a desk, this know-it-all analyst has, since 1980, been telling us to "Get a grip."Syndicated in more than 60 newspapers, including the Evening Sun, "Sylvia" has now become a stage star. Following a seven-month run in Chicago in 1991, the musical comedy "Sylvia's Real Good Advice" is receiving its East Coast premiere in a Horizons Theatre production at George Washington University.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Lately, I have become increasingly put off by Stephan Pastis' comic strip, Pearls Before Swine. I enjoy reading the strip but it seems lately there has been a lot more swearing by his characters. The problem I have is that my three children read every comic every day and short of cutting the strip out of the paper, there isn't any way that I could prevent them from reading it. I have had conversations with each of them about swearing and using inappropriate language and I think they understand.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Baltimore-born Donna A. Lewis is a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security who moonlights as a stripper. A comic stripper. Her semi-autobiographical strip, "Reply All," about a successful career woman struggling with self-doubt, has just been syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group. It debuts Monday in about a dozen newspapers nationwide, including The Post, Boston Globe and Charlotte Observer. While the strip is based loosely on Lewis' life, you won't see any "Dilbert"-style references to her day job. And not just because, as her bio on http://www.replyallcomic.com deadpans, "Donna is not funny or interesting at all by day. " Homeland Security has given her the OK to write the comic strip in her spare time, with the caveat that she must steer clear of anything related to her work for the department's Office of General Counsel.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
SHELDON DORF, 76 Comic-Con founder Sheldon Dorf, who founded the Comic-Con International comic book convention, died in San Diego on Tuesday. A longtime friend, Greg Koudoulian, said the Ocean Beach, Calif., resident died at a hospital of kidney failure. He had diabetes and had been hospitalized for about a year. Mr. Dorf, a freelance artist and comic-strip letterer, founded Comic-Con in San Diego in 1970 after moving from Detroit. The convention now draws 125,000 fans a year and is a major gathering for comic-book fans, artists, writers and movie stars.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Zippy the Pinhead, a well-traveled fellow who favors polka-dot bathrobes and loopy aphorisms, had a few choice words for his elected representative when he visited Baltimore recently. The text of his tirade is in plain view today in Bill Griffith's comic strip, Zippy, (see Page 6D). Standing in front of the Senator Theatre, Zippy - whose perception of reality is sometimes a mite off-kilter - is stunned when he realizes the building's symbolism. "So that's where the senator resides!" Zippy exclaims, reading the name above the marquee.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun reporter | January 1, 2007
Hello, F Minus. Goodbye, FoxTrot. A new comic strip - F Minus - makes its debut in The Sun today. Tony Carrillo's off-kilter look at everyday life is replacing FoxTrot Monday through Saturday. (Bill Amend, FoxTrot's creator, recently announced that his strip will run only on Sundays, allowing him time to pursue other interests.) "It's dry, a little bit deadpan, kind of sarcastic," Carrillo, 25, says of his strip, which today appears on Page 6C. "I try to stay away from precious moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Stossel and Scott Stossel,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Among the many rareified accomplishments to which the cartoonist Garry Trudeau can lay claim -- a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, a cartoon strip that runs in more than 1,400 newspapers, a 20-year marriage to Jane Pauley -- perhaps the most revealing is this one: Trudeau is surely the only person to have had one of his books prefaced with an essay by the arch-conservative William F. Buckley Jr. (Doonesbury's Greatest Hits: A Mid-Seventies Revue, Holt,...
NEWS
January 2, 1999
Walker Hancock, 97, a sculptor who spent his long career "ennobling the human figure," died Wednesday in his Gloucester, Mass., home.Mr. Hancock's work included statues of Douglas MacArthur at the Military Academy at West Point, John Paul Jones in Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, and James Madison in the Library of Congress in Washington.George Lynn Cross, 93, who guided the University of Oklahoma as its president from 1944 to 1968, died Thursday. Mr. Cross, the university's longest-serving president, initiated a construction project during his tenure in which 37 buildings were constructed or expanded.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
Scott Adams used to struggle for material for "Dilbert," his renowned, syndicated comic strip that chronicles a pointy-haired boss and his tormented staff, such as Tina the Tech Writer and Asok the Intern. But in recent years, real-life tales of worker disgust and job frustration have poured into Adams' electronic mailbox and provide fresh fodder for the strip as jaw-dropping as any fictional cartoon. There was the e-mail he received about a worker who was asked to contribute to his own farewell party.
BUSINESS
By Russ Britt and Russ Britt,CBS MARKETWATCH | May 27, 2003
REDMOND, Wash. - You could say the funny papers are perhaps beginning to turn into the funny Web pages. That appears to be one of the side effects of Doonesbury, the renowned satirical comic strip, setting up shop on Slate.com in an unusual partnership. The Doonesbury.com Web site has been folded into Slate, a deal believed to bring for the first time an established comic strip to a pure-play Web site. The sometimes controversial strip, penned by Garry Trudeau, will become part of Slate's opinion coverage, and the Web site will be titled DoonesburySlate.
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