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NEWS
January 18, 2005
The OpinionCommentary page has taken on a slightly new look with the addition of Doonesbury and The Boondocks. They'll be running here daily, Monday through Saturday, from now on. We hope our regular readers will enjoy the diversion. To those of you who have found your way here from the Today section for the first time: Welcome. We hope you stick around.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 1996
A lot of people are relaxing this holiday weekend, so perhaps we shouldn't fault broadcast TV for taking it easy as well. Virtually all the action tonight is on cable -- and even there, the best action consists of cable premieres of recent theatrical films."
NEWS
September 7, 2012
Your headline on Sept. 6, "Clinton sees clear choice," is comic relief to most of us out here who view the Democrats as the party that obviously lives on another planet. Yes, the clear choice in November is do you re-elect a man that had no experience (and it shows) to continue doing absolutely nothing (check his record not his rhetoric) and have the country experience four more years of high unemployment, no leadership, no budgets, failed policies, an astronomically-high deficit, and high gasoline prices?
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WHITCOVER | April 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Whenever things get grim here, we can depend on Congress to provide some comic relief. This time it was the Senate vote on Wednesday to preserve their free reserved parking spaces at National and Dulles airports.The vote was 53-44, and most of the margin was provided by senators who are either retiring or not up for re-election this year and thus won't be obliged to explain themselves to their constituents. Indeed, of the 26 running this year, 22 voted to give up the cherished perk -- 124 spaces at National and 51 at Dulles for members of Congress, the Supreme Court and the diplomatic corps.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1995
Family-oriented movies with the Disney touch dominate the broadcast networks tonight, while Veterans Day gets some attention on cable -- including live coverage of today's Washington ceremonies involving President Clinton.* "Million Man March" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Malik Yoba of Fox's "New York Undercover" is host of this retrospective on the October gathering of African-American men in D.C.* "Outdoors Maryland: Autumn Special" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- A "best of" re-packaging of previously aired segments shows off the state wearing its fall colors.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 5, 2003
Boston Red Sox president Larry Lucchino was so circumspect when he held the same position in Baltimore that it was difficult to get him to take a strong public position on anything. So why has he so willingly turned into the chief antagonist of controversial New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner? Lucchino, frustrated over another round of profligate Yankees free-agent spending, recently labeled baseball's most storied franchise "the evil empire" and has been involved in a nasty little verbal feud with The Boss ever since.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 16, 1992
It only hurts when you laugh, goes the old punch line.Seriously, though, the idea of this weekend's fifth annual "Comic Relief" is actually to provide the laughter that makes parting with money to help the homeless a little less painful.Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg and Robin Williams tonight present a lengthy array of comedians performing live in the four-hour telethon from the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles. And viewers will be urged to phone in pledges.The HBO cable service is the carrier, beginning at 9 p.m. But as in past years, the usual extra-cost service has given local cable companies permission to open the signal so all cable viewers can watch.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | October 8, 2006
Anthony Luewellyn is dressed in a black three-piece suit and black-checkered brim hat. It is an unusually conservative outfit for a man with a job that is decidedly unconventional. He is center stage, and all around him are children screaming with joy, smiling parents, trapeze artists and circus animals, all waiting for the UniverSoul Circus to begin. Luewellyn, who goes by the stage name Tony Tone, is in his first year as the ringmaster for the African-American big top, developed by Baltimorean Cedric Walker in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
When "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" posted a casting call for "Hardcore Eddie," every muscleman-actor on the way up in Hollywood went out for the part. They knew the character would be on-screen during crucial, cataclysmic action, right alongside Shia LaBeouf and Tyrese Gibson, who plays Epps, the leader of Eddie's good-guy mercenary crew. Baltimore-born Lester Speight walked into the audition and knew he'd nail it. "A lot of times, guys make jokes — they see you walk in and they say, 'Well, we might as well go home now.' For this one, I thought to myself — yeah, you might as well go home.' " He was right.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 25, 2009
Someday in a future that seems to grow more distant by the day, there presumably will be a verdict. Maybe not until there's snow on the ground, it can seem as we wait and then wait some more, but if and when jurors decide the fate of Mayor Sheila Dixon, I'll look back and think: Ah, this was the turning point. After days of sending out notes that signaled turmoil among their ranks followed by ones indicating progress, the jurors fell silent on Tuesday. There were no questions about legal definitions, no temperature readings of their discussions, not even a really-need-a-smoke bit of comic relief.
NEWS
By Rebecca Wilson and Rebecca Wilson,special to the sun | March 23, 2007
Twirling forks and platters, bright confetti, serenading candlesticks - this is certainly not your everyday dinner scene. Yet, this was what the audience was served during Wilde Lake High School's production of Disney's Beauty and the Beast. In the theater adaptation of the 1991 Disney movie, the life of a spoiled prince is changed forever when an enchantress turns him into a beast as punishment for his heartlessness. With only an enchanted rose and servants-turned-household-objects for company, the new Beast must gain the love of the beautiful Belle before the last petal of the rose falls.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | November 15, 2006
In a spacious, light-filled office high above the Inner Harbor, Ed Callahan leans back in a plastic chair, flips a fuzz-covered rubber ball from one hand to the other, and grins like a schoolboy. He has reason to feel mischievous. It's not just that the atmosphere here at Planit Agency, the Baltimore advertising firm he co-founded 14 years ago, is fun, though given the pool table in the corner, the pulsing plasma TVs along the walls and the sprightly orange color scheme throughout the place, it qualifies as that.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | October 8, 2006
Anthony Luewellyn is dressed in a black three-piece suit and black-checkered brim hat. It is an unusually conservative outfit for a man with a job that is decidedly unconventional. He is center stage, and all around him are children screaming with joy, smiling parents, trapeze artists and circus animals, all waiting for the UniverSoul Circus to begin. Luewellyn, who goes by the stage name Tony Tone, is in his first year as the ringmaster for the African-American big top, developed by Baltimorean Cedric Walker in 1994.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
They convene about 10 minutes after the game, forming a circle with their chairs in one of the far corners of the Orioles' clubhouse, where most of the relievers' lockers are located. The tone is light and the conversation is almost always baseball, sometimes a play from the game that just ended; other times a debate on the best approach to getting a certain hitter out. It's not just a gathering of the Orioles' bullpen, however, because everyone in the clubhouse -- aside from reporters who are playfully taunted when they dissect the circle -- is welcome.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Steve Kline sizes up his next victim, an unsuspecting soul whose only mistake is walking through the St. Louis Cardinals' clubhouse. The relief pitcher gets a running start and makes a perfect tackle, causing the man's hat to fly off his head, his arms flailing. They laugh as if the scene were playing out in a college dormitory. Kline did this at every opportunity, never once stopping to consider whether a part-owner of the franchise should be off-limits to such behavior.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Not a film to be analyzed, dissected or even thought through that carefully, Ong-Bak: The Thai Warrior is an opportunity to enjoy the pure adrenaline rush that has always been the hallmark of martial-arts cinema. It's also a chance to sample a new kind of martial art and to get in on the ground floor of the next big thing when it comes to Asian superstars. Muay Thai, which translates to "Thai boxing," is unlike anything American audiences have seen before, a mix of traditional martial-arts finesse and the free-for-all of a good street brawl.
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