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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | February 20, 2003
The main problem with laptop computers is that they're not very comfortable to use on your lap. First, today's hot microprocessors put out a lot of heat, which is often vented downwards through the bottom of the computer. As a result, a reasonably powerful computer can wind up slow-roasting your legs. Second, your lap isn't a very stable place. Move a leg or squirm a little - which is going to happen when you get cramped enough from sitting with your legs together with a computer balanced on them - and your expensive PC winds up, with a "thunk," on the floor.
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NEWS
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When homeowners Judy and Craig purchased 57 acres in Deale, Anne Arundel County, on which to build their dream home, they weren't building just a shelter from the elements or a place to keep their belongings. They were creating an environment that would be the foundation for a lifestyle. Judy, who had always wanted a farm, would finally have room to house her driving ponies and raise her own food. For Craig, an engineer, the new house would be an expression of his desire for a sustainable, energy-efficient lifestyle.
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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
Does a recumbent bike work different muscles than a traditional stationary bike, or is it just designed differently for comfort? The recumbent bike, in which you sit in a reclined position with your back supported and your feet outstretched, is gaining popularity these days at the gym. Mark Milani, a trainer at the Downtown Athletic Club, in Baltimore, says, "If we're making a choice around here, most of the people are going for the recumbent cycle."...
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
I remember back in October 1979 when a popular morning disc jockey in Baltimore was crowing after the Orioles were up three games to one in the World Series against the Pittsburgh Pirates. He dedicated the Eagles' “Heartache Tonight,” to Pittsburgh Pirates fans on the morning of Game 5. We all know how that worked out. So I'm not here to be a premature bartender. If you believe in jinxes, just nod politely and move to the end of the bar and I'll talk to everyone else.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Jeff Conine switched gloves again yesterday, slipping on a smaller model to take ground balls at third in an ongoing experiment by Orioles manager Mike Hargrove. Having spent most of his career at first base or the outfield, Conine is being tried at the hot corner this spring. He made four appearances there last season, his first since before the 1995 season while playing for the Florida Marlins. It wasn't always pretty, but it also wasn't enough to scare off the Orioles from trying again.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
The vote of confidence was not necessarily needed. Backup quarterback Chris Redman already felt comfortable about his standing with the Ravens. So even though coach Brian Billick reiterated earlier this week that Redman would be the No. 2 quarterback next season regardless of whether Randall Cunningham signs, it had little effect on Redman. "I can't control any of that," Redman said. "I just have to go out there and do what I do best. If Randall does come in, I think it will be a positive for me. Whenever you can be around a great quarterback, you can grasp knowledge from him. You take a little bit from everybody and hopefully get better."
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | June 22, 2003
The instinct among human beings to live in the open is as natural as their instinct to find shelter. But to indulge that impulse effectively at home, you must have the equivalent of outdoor rooms, spaces that are every bit as alluring, inviting and comfortable as indoor areas. For a porch, patio or backyard deck to be truly livable, it has to meet the same standards set for indoor rooms. It has to cater to physical, visual, emotional and even spiritual needs. To get the most out of an outdoor space, ask yourself what purpose it will serve.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Liz Claiborne, who was one of the first designers to dress the American working woman and built a vast business using her name as a recognizable brand, died Tuesday at New York Presbyterian Hospital from cancer. She was 78. Her personal assistant, Gwen Satterfield, reported her death yesterday. Ms. Claiborne, who began her career in New York in 1950, was one of the most recognizable names in fashion in the 1970s and 1980s, particularly among women who wanted quality, career-appropriate clothing and style, too. Ms. Claiborne and her husband, Arthur Ortenberg, founded Liz Claiborne Inc. in 1976.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
Olive W. Dennis, whose work as a research engineer for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad made railroad travel vastly more comfortable for passengers, occupied a unique position in the railroad industry for more than 30 years.As supervisor of passenger car design and service, Dennis had wide-ranging influence in the area of creature comforts, and many of her innovations remain in use today. They include designing the railroad's famous blue and white Colonial dining car china.For passenger comfortShe was an advocate of air-conditioned coaches and individual reclining seats covered in fade-resistant upholstery in a variety of colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder Newspapers | May 5, 2002
Female Trouble: Stories, by Antonya Nelson. Scribner. 249 pages. $24. Nearly all of Nelson's 13 stories are satisfying because she is able to limn from the banality of domestic comfort insistent little truths that linger like incense. First among these revelations is how women are just as capable as men of stirring up a perfectly comfortable life until it is subverted and forever changed. It is in "Palisades" that one finds Nelson at her most challenging. Here, a woman in comfortable circumstances feels compelled to topple the bourgeois good fortune of her predictable life.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The past 10 months have been a long wait for Johns Hopkins , which lost 29-24 to Wesley in the first round of the NCAA Division III playoffs on Nov. 23. Brandon Cherry said every member of the Blue Jays has been chomping at the bit for the start of the upcoming 2014 season, which kicks off on Saturday at noon with a home game against Randolph Macon at Homewood Field. “Everybody's just excited to get back on the field,” the junior running back said. “It's been a while since our last loss to Wesley, and we're putting that behind us. We're coming in with the fresh mind that it's a new season and we're ready to get back in it.” The new season means a featured tailback role for the Parkville resident and Boys' Latin graduate.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Morgan State nearly made Lee Hull's debut as head coach a memorable one, but the Bears fell short in a 31-28 loss to Eastern Michigan on Saturday night. A three-point defeat to a Football Bowl Subdivision program might normally be viewed in a favorable light, but the Bears, who play in the Football Championship Subdivision, aren't looking for moral victories. “They were upset because they thought they were the better football team,” Hull said of his players Tuesday morning during his weekly conference call organized by the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference.
NEWS
Valerie Bonk and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Taking months off from work and everyday responsibilities is something no one is ready for - especially a mother preparing for a new addition to her family. This is the situation Ellicott City resident Joannie Reisfeld found herself thrown into when she was placed on bed rest for two and a half months before the birth of her son, Zach. “I was used to being in charge of laundry and food, and you have to give up control at that point, and that can be very frustrating,” says Reisfeld, who delivered her now healthy 24-year-old son 10 weeks early at only 2 pounds, 10 ounces.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
As the former wide receivers coach at Maryland, first-year head coach Lee Hull is intent on adding a passing element to Morgan State's offense. But tailback Lamont Brown III hopes Hull won't overlook what has been the unit's traditional strength: running the football. “I look at myself and Herb [Walker Jr.] as two of the top running backs in the [Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference],” said Brown, a redshirt sophomore. “Whether [Hull] wants to run the ball or we have to get involved with the passing game, we're still going to be there, and he has two of the best running backs in the league and can't forget about us.” Brown, redshirt sophomore Walker and senior Tracy Martin make up a formidable partnership in the offensive backfield.
NEWS
By Justin George and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
People at Artscape stared at the group of dancers in a small pocket park. A man in a tucked-in checkered shirt twirled his fingers, a woman in a red bandana danced the hula and a boy in an Outkast T-shirt moved his hips. Yet there was no music in the air. That was the magic of the Silent Disco, one of the exhibits at the city's 33rd annual free arts festival. Dancers inside Pearlstone Park at Cathedral and Preston streets wore wireless headphones that pumped house and club music into their ears.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
As she enters her 80s, Margaret Himes looks to her garden for solace. She started the expansive garden behind her house in the fall of 1967, just a few months after she, her husband and their three children moved into the new home in Joppatowne. Himes and her then-2-year-old daughter, Patty, planted tulips in the backyard that first autumn. When they came up the next spring, Patty asked if they could plant flowers every year. Patty, who suffered from a congenital heart ailment, died later that year, but Himes continued to work in the garden.
NEWS
By Al Haas and Al Haas,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 19, 1992
It would be correct to say that the current-generation Chevrolet Corvette has remained essentially unchanged since its introduction as a 1984 model. But it also would be misleading.Indeed, America's sports car still looks much as it did, and is fundamentally the same mechanically. But over the years, the raw rookie has slowly metamorphosed into a refined veteran. The car's enhancement has been a tour de force in substantive automotive evolution.There has been a steady procession of technological advances, such as anti-lock braking and adjustable shock damping, and the replacement of the crude original manual transmission with a slick, six-speed ZF gearbox.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | November 2, 2006
LOUISVILLE, ky. -- Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro has recovered well enough from his injuries that he should be out of a cast for good within a week, his surgeon said yesterday. In addition to the broken right hind leg suffered in the Preakness on May 20, the 3-year-old has suffered from laminitis, which caused significant loss of his left hind hoof. However, Dr. Dean Richardson, who has been treating Barbaro at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., said the colt has regrown enough of that hoof so that "if he were [to]
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
While sitting at the L-shaped bar inside Remington's Parts & Labor on a recent Wednesday evening, it was easy to get distracted. There was no doubt we were in a restaurant attached to a premium butcher shop: Beautiful hunks of meat were on full display, cooking on the large, open grill that greets eyes and noses upon entering. An employee prepared more meat with a gliding slicer that moved so gracefully that I could not help but wonder its cost. Jimi Hendrix's “Purple Haze,” played at a level that still encouraged conversation, added to the atmosphere's unstuffy comfort.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
For those waiting on surgery to place a defibrillator inside their chest, special vests can deliver lifesaving shocks in the event of a heart arrhythmia. But the downside, some say, is that the vests are so uncomfortable some patients don't wear them all the time. A team of undergraduate Johns Hopkins University students, led by an alumnus inventor, set out to build a new prototype defibrillator vest that is more comfortable and works more effectively. The result — a vest that has won competitions and might be headed for approved medical use. "Each aspect of this had to not only function correctly but we had to think of it separately, like, how do we make it convenient and comfortable for the patient?"
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