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By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 16, 2007
BOSTON -- The name is what first grabbed my attention. Comfort women? What a moniker for the sexual slaves who were coerced, confined and raped in the Japanese military brothels strung across Asia during World War II. The very name reduces the women to the sum of their service. What kind of comfort did they supply? The label is only marginally more humane than the other words for the women listed on the procurement rolls: "items" and "logs." Now comfort women are back in the news because Rep. Michael M. Honda of California held hearings on a bill asking Japan to finally "acknowledge, apologize and accept historical responsibility in a clear and unequivocal manner for its Imperial Armed Force's coercion of young women into sexual slavery."
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 24, 2007
BOSTON -- So, we gather once more to pay homage to our foremothers by celebrating Aug. 26, the anniversary of the passage of suffrage. What a year it's been since we last met. We've seen the first female speaker of the House, the first female president of Harvard University, and who can forget Bill Clinton, striving to become the first First Laddie? Nevertheless, we continue our time-honored tradition, celebrating this day by announcing the cherished Equal Rites Awards to those who have labored over the last 12 months to set back the cause of women.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | August 6, 1995
"The Comfort Women: Japan's Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War," by George Hicks. Illustrated. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. 303 pages. $25 Once again, the Japanese government has sought to right a wrong of its wartime past - apologizing to the Asian women who were rounded up and forced into satisfying the sexual needs of the Japanese Armed Forces. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's July 18 acknowledgement of Japan's complicity in the sexual enslavement of the so-called "comfort women" is not the first apology offered to the victims, the majority of whom were Korean.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Japanese voters repudiated Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Sunday - and in no uncertain terms - over economic mismanagement. But if it slows down his desire to remilitarize Japan, that can only be a good consequence. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party lost control of the upper house of parliament, and the opposition Democratic Party of Japan is foursquare against Mr. Abe's nationalist tendencies. An immediate result may be the withdrawal of Japanese ships from the Indian Ocean once their authorization expires in November.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2000
WASHINGTON - Fifteen former "comfort women" from Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines and China filed a class-action lawsuit in federal court here yesterday against Japan, the first time allegations of sexual slavery stemming from wartime activities have been leveled against Japan in U.S. courts. Two of the 15 plaintiffs told about their experiences at a news conference announcing the lawsuit. Geum Joo Hwang said she was only 19 when she was told that Japanese emperor Hirohito had ordered all unmarried Korean girls to work in Japanese military factories.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 26, 2007
WASHINGTON --Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's first Washington meeting with President Bush was supposed to be a low-key affair designed to highlight the tight relationship between the United States and its Asian ally. But their sessions today and tomorrow will be a gathering of a president weakened by the war in Iraq and a prime minister hurt by a series of missteps, including his remarks about "comfort women" forced into sexual servitude for Japan's military during World War II. "It has put a poor spin on the trip," said Bruce Klinger, an Asia analyst for the Heritage Foundation, a Washington think tank.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Japanese voters repudiated Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Sunday - and in no uncertain terms - over economic mismanagement. But if it slows down his desire to remilitarize Japan, that can only be a good consequence. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party lost control of the upper house of parliament, and the opposition Democratic Party of Japan is foursquare against Mr. Abe's nationalist tendencies. An immediate result may be the withdrawal of Japanese ships from the Indian Ocean once their authorization expires in November.
NEWS
By Phyllis Bennis | April 27, 1997
It could have been any cruise ship, anywhere at sea. A group of young and middle-age people, all comfortably well off, ensconced in rattan chairs in the ship's lounge, engrossed in what was happening on stage. But they weren't listening to a hot jazz trio or watching a stand-up comedian. Instead, this group of Japanese travelers was watching a stark slide presentation on Auschwitz, narrated by a group of fellow passengers who had detoured from Rome for a few days to visit the Nazi death camp in Poland.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 27, 1992
TOKYO -- Skin-headed, right-wing extremists and long-haired, left-wing politicians both rail against the same evil here these days.Almost 2,000 years after the first recorded exchanges between the Chrysenthemum Throne and the Middle Kingdom, they say it's still not time -- and it's probably illegal -- for the emperor of Japan to make his first state visit to China.One right-winger demonstrated his sentiments on the subject last month by ritually stabbing himself in the belly in front of Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's private home.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 24, 2007
BOSTON -- So, we gather once more to pay homage to our foremothers by celebrating Aug. 26, the anniversary of the passage of suffrage. What a year it's been since we last met. We've seen the first female speaker of the House, the first female president of Harvard University, and who can forget Bill Clinton, striving to become the first First Laddie? Nevertheless, we continue our time-honored tradition, celebrating this day by announcing the cherished Equal Rites Awards to those who have labored over the last 12 months to set back the cause of women.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 26, 2007
WASHINGTON --Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's first Washington meeting with President Bush was supposed to be a low-key affair designed to highlight the tight relationship between the United States and its Asian ally. But their sessions today and tomorrow will be a gathering of a president weakened by the war in Iraq and a prime minister hurt by a series of missteps, including his remarks about "comfort women" forced into sexual servitude for Japan's military during World War II. "It has put a poor spin on the trip," said Bruce Klinger, an Asia analyst for the Heritage Foundation, a Washington think tank.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 16, 2007
BOSTON -- The name is what first grabbed my attention. Comfort women? What a moniker for the sexual slaves who were coerced, confined and raped in the Japanese military brothels strung across Asia during World War II. The very name reduces the women to the sum of their service. What kind of comfort did they supply? The label is only marginally more humane than the other words for the women listed on the procurement rolls: "items" and "logs." Now comfort women are back in the news because Rep. Michael M. Honda of California held hearings on a bill asking Japan to finally "acknowledge, apologize and accept historical responsibility in a clear and unequivocal manner for its Imperial Armed Force's coercion of young women into sexual slavery."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2000
WASHINGTON - Fifteen former "comfort women" from Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines and China filed a class-action lawsuit in federal court here yesterday against Japan, the first time allegations of sexual slavery stemming from wartime activities have been leveled against Japan in U.S. courts. Two of the 15 plaintiffs told about their experiences at a news conference announcing the lawsuit. Geum Joo Hwang said she was only 19 when she was told that Japanese emperor Hirohito had ordered all unmarried Korean girls to work in Japanese military factories.
TOPIC
July 9, 2000
TOKYO -- "The shame of our history is now going abroad," says Tadashi Kosho, who has spent his life studying the use of slave labor by Japanese companies during the war. Enter Edward Fagan, a New York lawyer and world-class embarrasser. The man who shamed Swiss bankers and German industrialists into stumping up billions of dollars for their wartime offenses now plans to take on the might of Japanese industry. Launched late last year on the anniversary of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Fagan's class-action lawsuit charges Mitsubishi Corporation, Mitsui & Company and Nippon Steel with violations of human rights, the use of forced labor and unjust enrichment.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- The women of Jordan arrived by the hundreds yesterday to console the widow of King Hussein, but the serene, blond Queen Noor did much of the consoling.The 47-year-old, American-born queen led the women of the royal family in an eight-hour reception yesterday at the palace of her late mother-in-law, Queen Zein.Yesterday was her first public appearance since the king's death Sunday from cancer. Considered an outsider in 1978 when she married the king, a man 16 years her senior, Queen Noor worked hard to establish herself as a Jordanian in this patriarchal, clannish society.
NEWS
By Phyllis Bennis | April 27, 1997
It could have been any cruise ship, anywhere at sea. A group of young and middle-age people, all comfortably well off, ensconced in rattan chairs in the ship's lounge, engrossed in what was happening on stage. But they weren't listening to a hot jazz trio or watching a stand-up comedian. Instead, this group of Japanese travelers was watching a stark slide presentation on Auschwitz, narrated by a group of fellow passengers who had detoured from Rome for a few days to visit the Nazi death camp in Poland.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- The women of Jordan arrived by the hundreds yesterday to console the widow of King Hussein, but the serene, blond Queen Noor did much of the consoling.The 47-year-old, American-born queen led the women of the royal family in an eight-hour reception yesterday at the palace of her late mother-in-law, Queen Zein.Yesterday was her first public appearance since the king's death Sunday from cancer. Considered an outsider in 1978 when she married the king, a man 16 years her senior, Queen Noor worked hard to establish herself as a Jordanian in this patriarchal, clannish society.
TOPIC
July 9, 2000
TOKYO -- "The shame of our history is now going abroad," says Tadashi Kosho, who has spent his life studying the use of slave labor by Japanese companies during the war. Enter Edward Fagan, a New York lawyer and world-class embarrasser. The man who shamed Swiss bankers and German industrialists into stumping up billions of dollars for their wartime offenses now plans to take on the might of Japanese industry. Launched late last year on the anniversary of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Fagan's class-action lawsuit charges Mitsubishi Corporation, Mitsui & Company and Nippon Steel with violations of human rights, the use of forced labor and unjust enrichment.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | August 6, 1995
"The Comfort Women: Japan's Brutal Regime of Enforced Prostitution in the Second World War," by George Hicks. Illustrated. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. 303 pages. $25 Once again, the Japanese government has sought to right a wrong of its wartime past - apologizing to the Asian women who were rounded up and forced into satisfying the sexual needs of the Japanese Armed Forces. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's July 18 acknowledgement of Japan's complicity in the sexual enslavement of the so-called "comfort women" is not the first apology offered to the victims, the majority of whom were Korean.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 27, 1992
TOKYO -- Skin-headed, right-wing extremists and long-haired, left-wing politicians both rail against the same evil here these days.Almost 2,000 years after the first recorded exchanges between the Chrysenthemum Throne and the Middle Kingdom, they say it's still not time -- and it's probably illegal -- for the emperor of Japan to make his first state visit to China.One right-winger demonstrated his sentiments on the subject last month by ritually stabbing himself in the belly in front of Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's private home.
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