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Comet Hyakutake

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NEWS
March 28, 1996
TO THE UNTUTORED EYE, the newly discovered Comet Hyakutake is the star that looks drunk on a cloudless night. It is a smudge when real stars are sharp. It changes its place from night to night and from hour to hour. It wasn't there, and then it was, and soon it will be gone.No Hubble or other fabled telescope or university consortium discovered this brightest of comets. Yuji Hyakutake, a dedicated amateur with equipment more powerful than most individuals have, did. Then, as word spread and the world peered, he had trouble seeing it again because his viewing mountain in Japan remained cloud-shrouded.
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By DAVE BARRY | April 28, 1996
I guess everybody wants to hear about how I almost got killed by a possibly supernatural being. This happened about a month ago, and I blame Comet Hyakutake.Comet Hyakutake was, of course, the most recent spectacular breathtaking once-in-a-lifetime astronomical event that nobody could see except astronomers. Every few years, when they figure we've forgotten the last alleged comet, the astronomers get together at a big party sponsored by the Telescope and Binocular Manufacturers Association, and after several hours of drinking gin straight out of bottles they "discover" a new comet, which they predict will be an awesome display of celestial fireworks.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
Scientists have been gun-shy about comet forecasts since Comet Kohoutek fizzled in 1973. But they're getting excited about another one that's due in the northern sky later this month.It's Comet Hyakutake (pronounced "hiya koo TAH key"), and one cautious astronomer has labeled it "The Great(?) Comet of 1996."Hyakutake should turn up near the handle of the Big Dipper about March 22 looking like a bright fuzz-ball bigger than a full moon. It will move slowly toward the northwest horizon by early April.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 1996
A total lunar eclipse is expected to begin at sunset tonight, as partly cloudy skies are predicted over Central Maryland.The moon already will be fully eclipsed when it rises in the east at 6: 26 p.m. Scientists expect it will be dimly lighted by the indirect glow of sunlight scattered by Earth's atmosphere, perhaps giving it an eerie, coppery-red color.At 7: 53 p.m., the moon will begin to emerge from Earth's shadow and to reflect direct sunlight. It will be fully illuminated again by 8: 59 p.m. The darkening of the full moon may make it easier to see Comet Hyakutake, now receding in the northwestern sky to the right of the bright planet Venus.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1996
Seven-year-old Philip Citerone of Towson climbed onto a stepladder at the Maryland Space Grant Observatory in Baltimore last night to get a telescopic look at Comet Hyakutake, the first naked-eye comet that most Marylanders have ever seen.He pronounced it, "Boring.""All I see is a dot. Nothing is happening," the Cromwell Elementary School student said as he peered through the observatory's 20-inch reflector telescope, on the roof of the Bloomberg Physics and Astronomy Building at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 1996
A total lunar eclipse is expected to begin at sunset tonight, as partly cloudy skies are predicted over Central Maryland.The moon already will be fully eclipsed when it rises in the east at 6: 26 p.m. Scientists expect it will be dimly lighted by the indirect glow of sunlight scattered by Earth's atmosphere, perhaps giving it an eerie, coppery-red color.At 7: 53 p.m., the moon will begin to emerge from Earth's shadow and to reflect direct sunlight. It will be fully illuminated again by 8: 59 p.m. The darkening of the full moon may make it easier to see Comet Hyakutake, now receding in the northwestern sky to the right of the bright planet Venus.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | April 28, 1996
I guess everybody wants to hear about how I almost got killed by a possibly supernatural being. This happened about a month ago, and I blame Comet Hyakutake.Comet Hyakutake was, of course, the most recent spectacular breathtaking once-in-a-lifetime astronomical event that nobody could see except astronomers. Every few years, when they figure we've forgotten the last alleged comet, the astronomers get together at a big party sponsored by the Telescope and Binocular Manufacturers Association, and after several hours of drinking gin straight out of bottles they "discover" a new comet, which they predict will be an awesome display of celestial fireworks.
NEWS
March 24, 1996
For showing Baltimore youngsters the way to careers in botany, zoology and chemistry, more than 200 community volunteers and ministers from 18 area churches received awards yesterday at the Columbus Center.More than 500 students were honored as well for their participation in the church-based "Science is for Everyone" project.Sponsored by Baltimore City Community College, the project introduces children to opportunities in science through weekend classes and field trips for their families.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
Stargazers say Comet Hyakutake is brightening nicely as it rushes toward its closest approach to Earth on Monday, making this weekend a prime viewing opportunity. Happily, Maryland's skies are expected to clear."It's visible even in the light-polluted area of Abingdon," said Larry Hubble, an amateur astronomer in Harford County. (He doesn't think he's related to famed astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, for whom the Hubble Space Telescope was named.) "I actually saw it with the naked eye a little fuzzy ball in the sky."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 1996
When Comet Hyakutake streaked close to Earth last week, a scientific spacecraft made a discovery that has astonished and puzzled astrophysicists. The comet was emitting X-rays in a crescent pattern on its sunward side.Cosmic radiations as powerful as X-rays are usually produced by cataclysmic forces. They are associated with the extremely hot gases spread by exploding stars or the tremendous accelerations of particles caught in the gravitational whirlpools around dense neutron stars or even denser black holes.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
TO THE UNTUTORED EYE, the newly discovered Comet Hyakutake is the star that looks drunk on a cloudless night. It is a smudge when real stars are sharp. It changes its place from night to night and from hour to hour. It wasn't there, and then it was, and soon it will be gone.No Hubble or other fabled telescope or university consortium discovered this brightest of comets. Yuji Hyakutake, a dedicated amateur with equipment more powerful than most individuals have, did. Then, as word spread and the world peered, he had trouble seeing it again because his viewing mountain in Japan remained cloud-shrouded.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1996
Seven-year-old Philip Citerone of Towson climbed onto a stepladder at the Maryland Space Grant Observatory in Baltimore last night to get a telescopic look at Comet Hyakutake, the first naked-eye comet that most Marylanders have ever seen.He pronounced it, "Boring.""All I see is a dot. Nothing is happening," the Cromwell Elementary School student said as he peered through the observatory's 20-inch reflector telescope, on the roof of the Bloomberg Physics and Astronomy Building at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
March 24, 1996
For showing Baltimore youngsters the way to careers in botany, zoology and chemistry, more than 200 community volunteers and ministers from 18 area churches received awards yesterday at the Columbus Center.More than 500 students were honored as well for their participation in the church-based "Science is for Everyone" project.Sponsored by Baltimore City Community College, the project introduces children to opportunities in science through weekend classes and field trips for their families.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
Stargazers say Comet Hyakutake is brightening nicely as it rushes toward its closest approach to Earth on Monday, making this weekend a prime viewing opportunity. Happily, Maryland's skies are expected to clear."It's visible even in the light-polluted area of Abingdon," said Larry Hubble, an amateur astronomer in Harford County. (He doesn't think he's related to famed astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, for whom the Hubble Space Telescope was named.) "I actually saw it with the naked eye a little fuzzy ball in the sky."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
Scientists have been gun-shy about comet forecasts since Comet Kohoutek fizzled in 1973. But they're getting excited about another one that's due in the northern sky later this month.It's Comet Hyakutake (pronounced "hiya koo TAH key"), and one cautious astronomer has labeled it "The Great(?) Comet of 1996."Hyakutake should turn up near the handle of the Big Dipper about March 22 looking like a bright fuzz-ball bigger than a full moon. It will move slowly toward the northwest horizon by early April.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1996
Flash! Comet Hale-Bopp is not being escorted through the solar system by a hollow alien spacecraft four times the size of the Earth.That's the bad news.The good news is that the comet is on course for a spectacular springtime display. It should provide backyard astronomers with a nighttime show at least as good as the naked-eye appearance by Comet Hyakutake in March.Hale-Bopp is sure to be the highlight of a 1997 astronomy calendar that also promises a near-total eclipse of the moon in March, and a striking lineup of planets in late December.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
The moon will be ducking into the shadows tomorrow night for its second total eclipse this year, and the last one visible in Maryland before 2000.At 9: 12 p.m., the full moon will begin drifting into the conical shadow cast into space by Earth. By 10: 19 p.m., it will be in full shade, where it will remain for more than an hour.Lunar eclipses are safe to view with the naked eye, and a pair of binoculars or a small telescope will enhance the experience.Weather permitting, the Maryland Science Center and members of the Baltimore Astronomical Society will sponsor a public eclipse-viewing in front of the science center at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, beginning at 9 p.m.The Harford County Astronomical Society plans an open house at the Harford Community College observatory, also starting at 9 p.m. And Baltimore's "Street Corner Astronomer," Herman Heyn, will make his telescope available to the curious at Fells Point.
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