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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Comedian Carlos Mencia is fueled by frustration. In fact, he always has been. Twenty years ago, when Mencia was working at Farmers Insurance and studying electrical engineering, he liked to gripe to his co-workers about the state of the world. Mencia was seriously upset, but his co-workers kept cracking up at what he'd say. They encouraged him to try stand-up during amateur night at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles. For Mencia, it was like being struck by a bolt of lightning. "The word 'epiphany' gets thrown around ... but truly, the first time I stepped on stage I had that moment of clarity," he said.
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By Michael Hill | August 12, 2014
They were called "round-robins" - a way of dividing up the stars of the new television season and the hundred or so critics who had come to Los Angeles to interview them. Instead of one unwieldy gathering, the critics divided into three groups and the stars rotated through. Maybe stars isn't the right word. These were actors on shows that had yet to air who hoped to become stars. The year was 1978, and I was the new TV critic for The Evening Sun on my first West Coast network tour, a biannual event.
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By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,Los Angeles Times | July 26, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- So, these comedians walk into a comedy club, and a nasty dispute breaks out over who is stealing jokes. The audience laughs, but the comedians don't seem to find it funny at all. The scene was the Comedy Store on the Sunset Strip earlier this year, and on stage were Carlos Mencia, the host of Comedy Central's Mind of Mencia, and stand-up comic and Fear Factor host Joe Rogan. Mencia let it be known he was upset that Rogan had been mercilessly bashing him as a "joke thief" and derisively referring to him as Carlos "Menstealia."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Comedian Carlos Mencia is fueled by frustration. In fact, he always has been. Twenty years ago, when Mencia was working at Farmers Insurance and studying electrical engineering, he liked to gripe to his co-workers about the state of the world. Mencia was seriously upset, but his co-workers kept cracking up at what he'd say. They encouraged him to try stand-up during amateur night at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles. For Mencia, it was like being struck by a bolt of lightning. "The word 'epiphany' gets thrown around ... but truly, the first time I stepped on stage I had that moment of clarity," he said.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | August 12, 2014
They were called "round-robins" - a way of dividing up the stars of the new television season and the hundred or so critics who had come to Los Angeles to interview them. Instead of one unwieldy gathering, the critics divided into three groups and the stars rotated through. Maybe stars isn't the right word. These were actors on shows that had yet to air who hoped to become stars. The year was 1978, and I was the new TV critic for The Evening Sun on my first West Coast network tour, a biannual event.
FEATURES
By Murry Frymer and Murry Frymer,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 30, 1992
Comic Roxanne Reese is on stage at Los Angeles' Comedy Store, finishing her act. "And now," she says, "a real big welcome for a man who's too legit to quit."A big welcome it is. The audience stands, claps and cheers. And then, in the corner, he enters: Richard Pryor, the angry, profanity-spewing comic who started it all for angry black comedians.It's a really big welcome for a man who now looks very little, walking onto the stage, holding the arm of his assistant. There is a dazed little grin on his face.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Eddie Griffin's near good riddance to television happened suddenly. Which could not have been soon enough, except for the searing pain in his chest and shortness of breath. At age 28, Griffin was having a heart attack. Make that had a heart attack. He was dead. Griffin would have done anything to leave Malcolm & Eddie, a by-the-numbers sitcom about two guys and a bar. Anything. Except dying. He was smoking three packs a day and inhaling fried chicken and pork-sauteed collard greens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 3, 2002
Need a good laugh? Comedian Howie Mandel brings his quick wit and sarcastic slant to Caesars Atlantic City tomorrow through Sunday. Mandel, who's been a stand-up comedian for more than 20 years, can well be labeled a workhorse in the entertainment industry, performing roughly 200 concerts a year. He's starred in television (St. Elsewhere, The Howie Mandel Show) and film (Little Monsters, the voice of Gizmo in Gremlins), and he's created a series of interactive animated CD-ROMs for children.
FEATURES
By Jody Leader and Jody Leader,Los Angeles Daily News | June 27, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Two comedy mavens will open new clubs in Los Angeles this week -- even though the recent comedy climate has been no laughing matter.After four years of planning, Richard Fields, Catch a Rising Star founder and chief executive officer, will open a comedy-variety club tomorrow in Universal City. He has signed a joint partnership deal with Universal Studios.Fields opened his first club in New York 20 years ago and has several clubs around the country. He also maintains a management agency for comedians.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 29, 1991
It is hard to imagine what the world would be like if Robin Williams had followed through on an early career interest and become a foreign service officer -- maybe better, if more national leaders could laugh it up a little with the manic comic/actor. Williams is the subject of the latest "...talking with David Frost" on PBS tonight (at 8, channels 22, 26 and 67), and offers a somewhat quieter and more introspective demeanor than usual. And while Frost is not able to say much, he keeps Williams on a more or less chronological track, from early comedy club work through the series "Mork and Mindy" and on to such movies as "Good Morning Vietnam," "Dead Poets Society" and "Awakenings."
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,Los Angeles Times | July 26, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- So, these comedians walk into a comedy club, and a nasty dispute breaks out over who is stealing jokes. The audience laughs, but the comedians don't seem to find it funny at all. The scene was the Comedy Store on the Sunset Strip earlier this year, and on stage were Carlos Mencia, the host of Comedy Central's Mind of Mencia, and stand-up comic and Fear Factor host Joe Rogan. Mencia let it be known he was upset that Rogan had been mercilessly bashing him as a "joke thief" and derisively referring to him as Carlos "Menstealia."
FEATURES
By Murry Frymer and Murry Frymer,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 30, 1992
Comic Roxanne Reese is on stage at Los Angeles' Comedy Store, finishing her act. "And now," she says, "a real big welcome for a man who's too legit to quit."A big welcome it is. The audience stands, claps and cheers. And then, in the corner, he enters: Richard Pryor, the angry, profanity-spewing comic who started it all for angry black comedians.It's a really big welcome for a man who now looks very little, walking onto the stage, holding the arm of his assistant. There is a dazed little grin on his face.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Paul Richard Franz, a builder and former gold miner who renovated homes in the Butchers Hill and Hampden neighborhoods, died of leukemia Sunday at his Roland Park home. He was 54. Mr. Franz was born in Baltimore and raised on Stevenson Lane in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1968 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. In 1970, he was drafted into the Army and served as a paratrooper and radio operator with the Special Forces.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | July 28, 1991
Peter Pan has nothing on Howie Mandel.so maybe the fictional hero can fly and vow never to grow up, but can he put a surgical glove over his head and inflate it with his nose? Or slip a fire extinguisher under a woman's dress at a Howard Johnson's?Keep the one-way ticket to Never Never Land, Peter. Howie's staying put in Hollywood, where acting like an eighth grader can bring big bucks.Just don't ask him to explain how or why."I do things because I think they're funny," the comedian said simply during a recent telephone interview from Los Angeles.
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