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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 7, 1993
Collaborators Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart and George Abbott bastardized Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors" to create their 1938 musical, "The Boys From Syracuse." So in theory, there are grounds for some of the liberties director Todd Pearthree takes in the latest production by his Musical Theatre ,, MAchine, in residence at the Spotlighters.One of the first things you notice when you enter the tiny theater is the signs advertising the various shops in ancient Ephesus, where the musical takes place.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
It was evident from watching Annapolis Shakespeare Company's director and cast members rehearse Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" that this young company is making astonishing strides - not small steps, but artful leaps. It was also clear that the show's opening would be a lively comic treat. Last year, I reported on ASC's progress from a small workshop taught by Sally Boyett-D'Angelo in summer 2009 into a thriving young company that had already become a full member of the county's established nonprofit performing-arts community.
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By Charlotte Moler and Charlotte Moler,Contributing Writer | October 11, 1992
So you didn't make Time magazine's recent roster o "America's top 100 cultural elite." Not to worry. The National Shakespeare Company is on a mission -- "to dispel the bugaboo that Shakespeare is for the elite" -- and it's going to outrageous lengths to prove its point.The Bard goes to Hollywood in a touring production of "The Comedy of Errors," in town last Saturday as part of the Harford Community College Fine Arts Calendar.This farce is about two sets of identical twins who are separated shortly after birth and land in the same town on the same fateful day as their long-lost father.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
This is a rare and wonderful season for the Howard girls field hockey team. With Friday's 4-3 home win over rival River Hill, the Lions have built an 8-3 record and are experiencing their best season in at least a dozen years. Last week, Howard beat rival Mount Hebron for the first time in 10 years, and Friday's win was its first over the Hawks in Lions coach Rick Oursler's eight-year tenure. "It is by far the best season we've had in a very long time," said Oursler, who said his team leads the Class 3A East regional standings.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 11, 2008
Actors wearing suits the shade of egg yolks cruise down a stage on scooters. Balloons bob on the breeze. There's a line of Keystone Cops, and performers silently mime bits of slapstick during scene changes. Director Ian Gallaner has festooned his Chesapeake Shakespeare Company production of The Comedy of Errors with trappings designed to make the show feel buoyant and swift, but unfortunately, the actors can't pull off the kind of high style he has in mind. I couldn't help wishing that Gallaner had devoted less time and effort on what essentially are garnishes, and focused instead on developing even a single compelling performance on the stage at the Patapsco Female Institute's historic ruins.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 3, 1993
Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" has been presented as an opera, a circus, a Western, and a Broadway musical. By now, there may be nothing that hasn't been tried. But British director John Retallack, making his American debut at the Shakespeare Theatre, has chosen a clever twist.He has one actor playing each of the comedy's two sets of twins. Philip Goodwin portrays Antipholus of Syracuse and his long-lost brother, Antipholus of Ephesus; and Floyd King portrays their twin servants, Dromio of Syracuse and Dromio of Ephesus.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 2000
Weather and box-office success conspired to turn Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" into something of a work in progress during its first weekend on the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre stage. Rain, and the extra performances of "Jesus Christ Superstar" presented to accommodate the crowds who flocked to see Summer Garden's biggest success in years, rendered impossible a seamless transition into the season's second offering, which will run at 8:30 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays through July 29. But even without music, special effects lighting and other wrinkles that director Carol Youmans wanted to have for the opening weekend, the outline of a robust, adept Shakespearean experience is in place.
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2003
Step into the intimate black box theatre at Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City and enter a world that artfully blends Federico Fellini and Salvador Dali with vintage Flash Gordon, plus a dash of The Wizard of Oz. You have stumbled into the realm of William Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors, a second-season opener for the exceptionally professional Chesapeake Shakespeare Company. Based on an ancient Roman play, titled Menaechmi by Plautus (a Neil Simon of his day), Shakespeare adapted The Comedy of Errors as one of his earliest works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 13, 2000
What do you get when you combine Shakespeare, Abbott and Costello and the old TV show "Three's Company"? Mobtown Players claim you get "The Comedy of Errors," Shakesare's tale of two sets of twins, separated at birth. The 18-month-old company's modern-dress production opens tomorrow in the upstairs theater at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Ryan Whinnem directs a cast headed by Bill Garrett and Noel Schively as Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse and Lisa Anne Mix and Valarie Perez Schere as their respective servants, both named Dromio.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
William Shakespeare wrote plays for the masses. So if he were alive today, chances are he'd be writing Broadway musicals. Composer Richard Rodgers, lyricist Lorenz Hart and playwright/director George Abbott blazed the way in 1938 with the first Broadway musical based on a Shakespeare play. Abbott adapted the script for The Boys from Syracuse from Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, and Rodgers and Hart filled it with such gems as "Falling in Love With Love" and "This Can't Be Love." The Boys from Syracuse runs through Jan. 14 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. $10-$65.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,Special to The Sun | June 13, 2008
An ancient Roman playwright named Plautus had a great idea for a comedy: A pair of twins are separated as infants. One twin, now grown, travels to a place where, unknown to him, he has a brother. Complications arise when the two are mistaken for one another. Many centuries later, the idea still seemed funny to Shakespeare, so he borrowed it for a play of his own. To "make assurance double sure," as Macbeth once said, he created another pair of twins, also separated at a young age and now working as servants to the first pair.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 11, 2008
Actors wearing suits the shade of egg yolks cruise down a stage on scooters. Balloons bob on the breeze. There's a line of Keystone Cops, and performers silently mime bits of slapstick during scene changes. Director Ian Gallaner has festooned his Chesapeake Shakespeare Company production of The Comedy of Errors with trappings designed to make the show feel buoyant and swift, but unfortunately, the actors can't pull off the kind of high style he has in mind. I couldn't help wishing that Gallaner had devoted less time and effort on what essentially are garnishes, and focused instead on developing even a single compelling performance on the stage at the Patapsco Female Institute's historic ruins.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
William Shakespeare wrote plays for the masses. So if he were alive today, chances are he'd be writing Broadway musicals. Composer Richard Rodgers, lyricist Lorenz Hart and playwright/director George Abbott blazed the way in 1938 with the first Broadway musical based on a Shakespeare play. Abbott adapted the script for The Boys from Syracuse from Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, and Rodgers and Hart filled it with such gems as "Falling in Love With Love" and "This Can't Be Love." The Boys from Syracuse runs through Jan. 14 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. $10-$65.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
Identify the limits to religious-use law The Rochambeau demolition debate has brought much-needed scrutiny to the Religious Land Use Act ("Apartment demolition set to start Saturday," Sept. 13). The attorney for the Mount Vernon Belvedere Association, George Liebmann, eloquently argued that the law was designed to eliminate discrimination against religious institutions, not to allow any religious use to trump local laws. Otherwise, couldn't anyone (or any devious developer) simply buy ordainment credentials from the back of a magazine, establish a church, and then argue that he or she has the right to put up a neon billboard, add 10 stories or tear down any historic building?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2005
THEATER SEEING DOUBLE Brother will meet brother and East will meet West in the Shakespeare Theatre's production of The Comedy of Errors, opening at the Washington theater Sunday under the direction of Douglas C. Wager. For this play about two pairs of twin brothers separated at birth, designer Zack Brown has created a surrealistic set, inspired by Salvador Dali and M.C. Escher, and Middle Eastern costumes with Western touches. The production also has an original score, composed by Fabian Obispo, that blends traditional Middle Eastern music with modern trip hop. The cast is headed by Paul Whitthorne and Gregory Wooddell as one set of brothers, and Daniel Breaker and LeRoy McClain as their twin servants.
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2003
Step into the intimate black box theatre at Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City and enter a world that artfully blends Federico Fellini and Salvador Dali with vintage Flash Gordon, plus a dash of The Wizard of Oz. You have stumbled into the realm of William Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors, a second-season opener for the exceptionally professional Chesapeake Shakespeare Company. Based on an ancient Roman play, titled Menaechmi by Plautus (a Neil Simon of his day), Shakespeare adapted The Comedy of Errors as one of his earliest works.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,Special to The Sun | June 13, 2008
An ancient Roman playwright named Plautus had a great idea for a comedy: A pair of twins are separated as infants. One twin, now grown, travels to a place where, unknown to him, he has a brother. Complications arise when the two are mistaken for one another. Many centuries later, the idea still seemed funny to Shakespeare, so he borrowed it for a play of his own. To "make assurance double sure," as Macbeth once said, he created another pair of twins, also separated at a young age and now working as servants to the first pair.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2005
THEATER SEEING DOUBLE Brother will meet brother and East will meet West in the Shakespeare Theatre's production of The Comedy of Errors, opening at the Washington theater Sunday under the direction of Douglas C. Wager. For this play about two pairs of twin brothers separated at birth, designer Zack Brown has created a surrealistic set, inspired by Salvador Dali and M.C. Escher, and Middle Eastern costumes with Western touches. The production also has an original score, composed by Fabian Obispo, that blends traditional Middle Eastern music with modern trip hop. The cast is headed by Paul Whitthorne and Gregory Wooddell as one set of brothers, and Daniel Breaker and LeRoy McClain as their twin servants.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
The Navy is negotiating a deal to drop all charges against a former National Security Agency cryptologist accused of mailing a computer disk to the Russian embassy, naval officials said yesterday. Daniel King, a decorated petty officer first class, has been held in the military brig at Quantico, Va., for more than 500 days since he was arrested in October 1999 after he allegedly failed a routine lie detector test. The move comes after months of setbacks to the Navy's case that included defense accusations of security violations by the prosecutors and the investigating officer and a military appeals court twice ruling in the defense's favor, once ordering that prosecutors restart the case.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 2000
Weather and box-office success conspired to turn Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" into something of a work in progress during its first weekend on the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre stage. Rain, and the extra performances of "Jesus Christ Superstar" presented to accommodate the crowds who flocked to see Summer Garden's biggest success in years, rendered impossible a seamless transition into the season's second offering, which will run at 8:30 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays through July 29. But even without music, special effects lighting and other wrinkles that director Carol Youmans wanted to have for the opening weekend, the outline of a robust, adept Shakespearean experience is in place.
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