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Comeback Kid

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By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
Ryan Tucker is a fine lacrosse player and, fortunately, a very good listener. That helps explain what many believe to be nearly unexplainable — Gilman's improbable 7-6 overtime win over Boys' Latin in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference semifinals in mid-May. The Greyhounds went on to capture the league championship a few days later with a victory over Calvert Hall, but the semifinal win is being described by many as the league's greatest comeback.
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By Steve Jones | October 20, 2011
Ethan Harvey hasn't played football in nine years. Before this season, Harvey last played organized football in 2003 - when he was in the third grade. So what is a 17-year-old doing in a Westminster Owls uniform in his senior year of high school, starting for a team that could make a run for a state title? Harvey has made an improbable comeback on and off the field this year as a starting lineman and a key cog for an offense that leads the county in scoring at 30 points a game.
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NEWS
February 20, 1992
"New Hampshire tonight has made Bill Clinton the comeback kid," the Arkansas governor said Tuesday night. He was referring to the fact that many political commentators had pronounced his candidacy dead or dying after he was accused first of having an affair with singer Gennifer Flowers through most of the 1980s and then of dodging the draft in the 1960s. In his view and that of many others, Governor Clinton's second place finish in the Democratic half of the New Hampshire presidential primary was a stunning comeback.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
Ryan Tucker is a fine lacrosse player and, fortunately, a very good listener. That helps explain what many believe to be nearly unexplainable — Gilman's improbable 7-6 overtime win over Boys' Latin in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference semifinals in mid-May. The Greyhounds went on to capture the league championship a few days later with a victory over Calvert Hall, but the semifinal win is being described by many as the league's greatest comeback.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 15, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, as part of his farewell tour, returned the other day to New Hampshire, where in 1992 he had proclaimed himself "The Comeback Kid" after finishing second in the state's kickoff primary. At the time, he deftly peddled his showing as a victory since the real primary winner, Paul Tsongas, came from neighboring Massachusetts. On this final visit to the state as president, Mr. Clinton waxed nostalgic about how the locals had rescued him from political oblivion -- without mentioning what had put him in such peril then.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 16, 1997
JUST CALL HIM Bill Clinton Jr. That is how Parris N. Glendening seems to view himself. His staffers talk about the similarities -- and wonder if that could mean a bright future for Maryland's governor.The two men come from impoverished beginnings in the South. Each was the first in his family to go to college. Both are ''policy wonks'' who revel in arcane discussions of government as political science. They became governors, trying to establish a record that would lead to bigger things.And both men are supremely confident in their ability to persevere and eventually succeed.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 19, 1992
NEW YORK -- In politics, unlike real life, you do get a second chance to make a first impression.And so now Bill Clinton gets to reinvent himself.He would like to be known as the Comeback Kid. Which certainly sounds better than Slick Willie.He would like to remind us of John Kennedy. Which is certainly better than reminding us of Gary Hart.But though Clinton now leaves New York with the customary improvement in the polls, he will find that, in a presidential campaign, the past is never gone.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
SANDOVAL, Ill. -- In this prairie town, where patriotism and poverty live side by side, residents long for the day when the Comeback Kid comes back.It isn't much to look at, this speck on the map in south central Illinois. But little Sandoval is the town that brought Bill Clinton's bus to a screeching halt. Even hardened political operatives recall it as one of those mystical moments.Rushing from one rally in Centralia to another in Vandalia last July 21, running late as usual, Mr. Clinton was amazed to see virtually the whole population of this town gathered by the side of Highway 51 with flags fluttering.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1997
When Bill Clinton comes to Annapolis today, Gov. Parris N. Glendening will have a chance to study his comeback role model -- up close and in action.The governor could be watching for new ways to emulate a man who returned from the politically dead -- a president whose first-term troubles were thought to mean he could never win a second.Glendening hopes to accomplish roughly the same feat, following the same upward trajectory as the president.Clinton comes to Maryland as a champion of performance standards for the public schools, scholarships for B-average college students, health care coverage for poor women and infants and an array of other initiatives -- many of which Glendening has proposed for Maryland.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
More than eight months ago, we quoted Gov. Bill Clinton as saying of his second-place finish in the year's first presidential primary, "New Hampshire tonight has made Bill Clinton the comeback kid." He was referring to the fact that after explosive revelations about his womanizing and his draft avoidance had knocked him out of first place in the public opinion polls, he gained back about half his loss to finish behind Paul Tsongas.We took the conventional view that former Senator Tsongas was the real comeback kid. He doubled his support to win the New Hampshire primary.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 7, 2011
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich took the first tentative step toward a 2012 presidential candidacy the other day by declaring that he was merely launching the "testing the waters" phase — exploring whether the money and other support would be there for serious contention. In the ridiculous jargon of the Federal Election Commission, it means a would-be candidate can raise and spend up to $5,000 to assemble a staff, conduct research and travel the country to get the answer.
SPORTS
By Dylan Hernandez, Tribune Newspapers | October 19, 2010
SAN FRANCISCO — The last time Cole Hamels was on the mound, Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said he saw the Cole Hamels of old. The way Manuel was talking — "When he's really good, he's good the same way he was before" — he made Hamels sound like someone in his mid-30s. Or someone recovering from a major elbow operation. Hamels is 26. His left arm has never been cut open. But Hamels, who will face the Giants on Tuesday in Game 3 of the National League Championship Series, has already experienced enough in his relatively brief career to be enjoying a revival.
NEWS
By Phil Roger | May 9, 2010
Dontrelle Willis (1-1, 3.99 ERA) appears to be all the way back for the Tigers. He froze Justin Morneau with a well-placed 94 mph fastball Tuesday, when he retired 12 straight Twins in one stretch. Twins manager Ron Gardenhire called Willis' stuff "good, really good." He faces the Yankees on Monday. … The Mariners' Ken Griffey isn't the only old hand whose popularity and production is an issue for an AL West front office. The A's are dealing with the same thing involving Eric Chavez, who is turning the designated hitter spot into a powerless wasteland.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | March 10, 2008
Some of his closest allies braced for the worst as Rep. Steny H. Hoyer strode to the podium at Washington's annual Gridiron dinner Saturday night. Suffice it to say that, at least by reputation, Hoyer's oratorical skills seemed more apropos for a legislative debate than a stand-up routine in front of President Bush, Washington's top politicians and journalists. A few years back, he had taken on a similar gig and bombed. But after unleashing an impressive barrage of one-liners that wowed what can be a pretty tough crowd, all that may be changed.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,sun reporter | December 3, 2006
During a Harford County League dual meet in the 2002-03 season, Havre de Grace was forfeiting so many bouts that Aberdeen's wrestling team would have had to lose every bout by pin to lose the match. "Every one of our kids lost, but we had a couple of guys not get pinned. And because of that, we were able to win our one match of the season by a few points," recalled coach Jerry Lacey, who was then an assistant. "I called [former coach] Dick Slutzky on the phone and I had to brag a little bit. I told him, `We did something you never did: We won a dual meet without actually winning a bout.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
There are comebacks, and then there is what Phil Jackson is doing. The world of sports, of course, is full of examples of the former, what with Muhammad Ali coming back time and again to win the heavyweight boxing championship and Mike Tyson returning for six rounds last week. But Jackson is not just coming back as coach of the Los Angeles Lakers -- he is returning to an organization that he unhappily parted ways with and that he promptly trash-talked in his 2004 autobiography, The Last Season.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | February 5, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- When President Clinton flew in the other day, he found all the trappings of a full-scale presidential campaign -- placard-waving fans at the airport, enthusiastic audiences calling for ''four more years,'' the usual clutch of reporters and camera crews.The Clinton-Gore campaign has had an operation here for three months manned by two dozen full-time staffers, half of them paid the campaign, the others ''volunteers'' otherwise financed. There are six field offices, and more than 4,000 activists have signed on to a statewide steering committee.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 19, 1999
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- President Clinton returned yesterday to the state that once made him the "Comeback Kid," bathing in nostalgia and hoping for a resurrection of sorts to rebuild the stature of his tarnished presidency.Seven years ago to the day, a young Arkansas governor revived his presidential campaign by surging to a second-place finish in the crucial New Hampshire primary, surviving allegations of marital infidelity and draft dodging.Yesterday, on his first domestic trip since his impeachment trial to once again right his listing political ship, Clinton returned to the Granite State.
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