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By PETER H. LEWIS | November 22, 1993
For all the hullabaloo about faster computers, smarter software and wireless widgets, the real excitement at last week's Comdex/Fall trade show occurred in an annex where the called multimedia computer companies were quarantined.For those who wanted more than the basic multimedia setup,companies on the hardware side were touting the benefits of subwoofer speakers to go with their stereo computer speakers, faster CD-ROM drives, chips and plug-in boards that produce higher-quality color images, big-screen color monitors, devices with which to connect camcorders and VCRs to computers and, of course, lots of computer memory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 19, 2001
It's always fun to see what's new at Comdex, the giant computer industry show that drew thousands of geeks, corporate execs and marketing wizards to Las Vegas earlier this month. This year's extravaganza was smaller and more subdued than normal in the aftermath of Sept. 11, but Comdex still provided an opportunity to see what new goodies the people who make PCs, peripherals, phones, PDAs and other gadgets have in the works. Unfortunately, the industry has reached a point where too many new products have the look and feel of solutions in search of a problem.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 14, 1995
TOKYO -- A Japanese entrepreneur crowned himself the king of American computer trade shows yesterday, as his company agreed to pay $800 million in cash to buy the organization that runs the huge annual Comdex exhibition.While analysts say the price is high, the buyer, Softbank Corp., Japan's leading distributor of software and publisher of computer magazines, is acquiring a prestigious entree into the U.S. computer world. Comdex, which is held each November in Las Vegas, is traditionally the biggest showcase for new hardware and software technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
LAS VEGAS - Joe O'Leary wasn't helping. I really wanted a ViA computer to strap to my backside. But the vice president of marketing for ViA Inc. realized long before I did that my wife might ask a practical question about the purchase: Why do you need a $5,000 computer on your rump? "This really isn't marketed to consumers," O'Leary consoled me, as I showed my disappointment. "It really has more business applications, and we sell them from $3,000 to $5,000 depending upon the number you want."
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | October 28, 1991
LAS VEGAS -- Apple Computer Inc., making it clear that it will no longer be an outsider in the personal computer industry, introduced an impressive collection of new Macintosh computers last week's Comdex Fall computer trade show here.Comdex Fall is the biggest annual event in the computer industry, but until this year Apple had been a minor participant in a show dominated by IBM PC and compatible computers.Buoyed by its recent alliance with the International Business Machines Corp., Apple not only came to Comdex, but also made one of the biggest opening-day splashes.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- More than 200,000 computer geeks spent last week ogling the latest high-tech hardware and rubbing shoulders with industry luminaries including Microsoft's chairman, Bill Gates. The event was Comdex, the world's largest computer trade show.A few blocks from Comdex, inside a threadbare conference room at the Imperial Palace hotel and casino, another hot technology trade show was under way. And it too was drawing techies looking to ogle hardware and rub shoulders with industry luminaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 19, 2001
It's always fun to see what's new at Comdex, the giant computer industry show that drew thousands of geeks, corporate execs and marketing wizards to Las Vegas earlier this month. This year's extravaganza was smaller and more subdued than normal in the aftermath of Sept. 11, but Comdex still provided an opportunity to see what new goodies the people who make PCs, peripherals, phones, PDAs and other gadgets have in the works. Unfortunately, the industry has reached a point where too many new products have the look and feel of solutions in search of a problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | November 22, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- If it seems as if the Internet is everywhere these days, just wait: From the toilet to the TV room, you ain't seen nothing yet.Technology companies here at the mammoth Comdex computer show last week pulled the wraps off a new class of Internet devices called "information appliances." They're betting that these gadgets will become the Next Big Thing for the home.If the term "information appliance" sounds like a cross between a toaster and a computer kiosk, you're on the right track.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | November 14, 1990
LAS VEGAS -- Smaller, faster, more powerful, less expensive and more overwhelming: These are the words that best describe the products on display here at the annual personal computer trade exposition called Comdex, a high-tech bazaar where an estimated 120,000 computer buyers and sellers are meeting this week to inspect the latest hardware and software.The new products are spread out over more than 2 million square feet of display booths.On the desktop, machines of the first generation to be based on the Intel 486 microprocessor are on display.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 11, 1997
TOKYO -- Softbank Corp., the flagship enterprise in Japan of billionaire computer mogul Masayoshi Son, said yesterday that it will merge three of its most valuable U.S. subsidiaries in a move that will create a powerhouse in the computer products sales field.The three are Ziff-Davis Publishing, publisher of three of the top-selling U.S. computer magazines; Comdex, the world's largest operator of computer trade shows; and Softbank Forums, which conducts sales and training for computer products.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- More than 200,000 computer geeks spent last week ogling the latest high-tech hardware and rubbing shoulders with industry luminaries including Microsoft's chairman, Bill Gates. The event was Comdex, the world's largest computer trade show.A few blocks from Comdex, inside a threadbare conference room at the Imperial Palace hotel and casino, another hot technology trade show was under way. And it too was drawing techies looking to ogle hardware and rub shoulders with industry luminaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | November 22, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- If it seems as if the Internet is everywhere these days, just wait: From the toilet to the TV room, you ain't seen nothing yet.Technology companies here at the mammoth Comdex computer show last week pulled the wraps off a new class of Internet devices called "information appliances." They're betting that these gadgets will become the Next Big Thing for the home.If the term "information appliance" sounds like a cross between a toaster and a computer kiosk, you're on the right track.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 11, 1997
TOKYO -- Softbank Corp., the flagship enterprise in Japan of billionaire computer mogul Masayoshi Son, said yesterday that it will merge three of its most valuable U.S. subsidiaries in a move that will create a powerhouse in the computer products sales field.The three are Ziff-Davis Publishing, publisher of three of the top-selling U.S. computer magazines; Comdex, the world's largest operator of computer trade shows; and Softbank Forums, which conducts sales and training for computer products.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 14, 1995
TOKYO -- A Japanese entrepreneur crowned himself the king of American computer trade shows yesterday, as his company agreed to pay $800 million in cash to buy the organization that runs the huge annual Comdex exhibition.While analysts say the price is high, the buyer, Softbank Corp., Japan's leading distributor of software and publisher of computer magazines, is acquiring a prestigious entree into the U.S. computer world. Comdex, which is held each November in Las Vegas, is traditionally the biggest showcase for new hardware and software technologies.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 22, 1993
For all the hullabaloo about faster computers, smarter software and wireless widgets, the real excitement at last week's Comdex/Fall trade show occurred in an annex where the called multimedia computer companies were quarantined.For those who wanted more than the basic multimedia setup,companies on the hardware side were touting the benefits of subwoofer speakers to go with their stereo computer speakers, faster CD-ROM drives, chips and plug-in boards that produce higher-quality color images, big-screen color monitors, devices with which to connect camcorders and VCRs to computers and, of course, lots of computer memory.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | October 28, 1991
LAS VEGAS -- Apple Computer Inc., making it clear that it will no longer be an outsider in the personal computer industry, introduced an impressive collection of new Macintosh computers last week's Comdex Fall computer trade show here.Comdex Fall is the biggest annual event in the computer industry, but until this year Apple had been a minor participant in a show dominated by IBM PC and compatible computers.Buoyed by its recent alliance with the International Business Machines Corp., Apple not only came to Comdex, but also made one of the biggest opening-day splashes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
LAS VEGAS - Joe O'Leary wasn't helping. I really wanted a ViA computer to strap to my backside. But the vice president of marketing for ViA Inc. realized long before I did that my wife might ask a practical question about the purchase: Why do you need a $5,000 computer on your rump? "This really isn't marketed to consumers," O'Leary consoled me, as I showed my disappointment. "It really has more business applications, and we sell them from $3,000 to $5,000 depending upon the number you want."
BUSINESS
By Seattle Times | November 18, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- In a city abuzz with buzz words during the annual Comdex computer trade show this week, the term "virtual" is far and away the most popular.At Bally's Hotel on the strip, a Canadian company called QSound Ltd. is showing "virtual sound" for games, training and education.Using a common set of stereo speakers and a proprietary technique, it "fools the brain" into thinking sounds are coming from each side and even from behind the listener, said consultant Brian Schmidt.At Piero's Restaurant across from the Las Vegas Convention Center, Virtual Reality Laboratories Inc. of San Luis Obispo, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | November 14, 1990
LAS VEGAS -- Smaller, faster, more powerful, less expensive and more overwhelming: These are the words that best describe the products on display here at the annual personal computer trade exposition called Comdex, a high-tech bazaar where an estimated 120,000 computer buyers and sellers are meeting this week to inspect the latest hardware and software.The new products are spread out over more than 2 million square feet of display booths.On the desktop, machines of the first generation to be based on the Intel 486 microprocessor are on display.
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