Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComcast
IN THE NEWS

Comcast

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 8, 2013
Was glad to see The Sun article drawing attention to Comcast charging for digital adapters ("Comcast starts charging monthly fee for digital adapters," May 5). I called Comcast when this appeared on my bill because I have two Comcast adapters on old TV's in rooms where they are seldom, if ever, used. I got them at the time of the changeover to digital and gave away my free government-subsidized converters because I thought I didn't need them. I guess this senior citizen has gotten you-know-whated again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
About 30,000 low-income Marylanders, half of them in the Baltimore region, have signed up for $10-a-month Internet service, Comcast officials said Monday as they promoted broadened access to the program, now in its fourth year. The Philadelphia-based cable service provider revealed the figures at an event at Baltimore's Digital Harbor Foundation, an after-school program it is working with to help close the digital divide. Comcast is giving the foundation free Internet service and donated more than 50 laptops to students at the event, attended by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 17, 2012
If you're transfixed by the idea of a "smart home," Comcast today is launching a new product in Maryland that can help you control your home at the touch of a touch screen, iPhone or iPad. The company is rolling out its Xfinity Home package in Baltimore and other areas around Maryland. It's a system that integrates a home security system with other monitoring, control and automation features, such as remote climate and lighting control. To get a feel for the offering, check out: http://www.comcast.com/homesecurity/index.htm?
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Comcast is making more poor families eligible for a program offering $10-a-month broadband Internet access, and it's offering them a period of free service as part of a back-to-school promotion. Households with past due balances were previously barred from the program, known as Internet Essentials, but they will no longer be if their unpaid bills are more than a year old, according to a blog post on Comcast's website. The Philadelphia-based cable television and Internet service provider also said it would allow families with a "reasonable" amount of debt to pay it off in installments.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Comcast is making more poor families eligible for a program offering $10-a-month broadband Internet access, and it's offering them a period of free service as part of a back-to-school promotion. Households with past due balances were previously barred from the program, known as Internet Essentials, but they will no longer be if their unpaid bills are more than a year old, according to a blog post on Comcast's website. The Philadelphia-based cable television and Internet service provider also said it would allow families with a "reasonable" amount of debt to pay it off in installments.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 6, 2011
If you've got an analog television and subscribe to Comcast's "limited basic" package --- basically broadcast channels plus Univision and some government access --- you'll need some new equipment. Comcast is offering customers up to three digital adapters at no additional monthly charge, said spokeswoman Alisha Martin. With the adaptors, these customers will get digital-quality picture and sound as well as an additional dozen channels. Customers who subscribe to other levels of service have already moved to digital-only, she said.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2009
HOLLYWOOD - Media colossus NBC Universal is a giant step closer to being sold to the nation's largest cable company in a proposed $29 billion deal. A huge barrier in Philadelphia-based Comcast Corp.'s bid to become one of the country's most powerful entertainment companies was lifted when General Electric Co. - which has owned NBC for nearly a quarter-century - reached an exit strategy with its French partner Vivendi. Late Monday's development breaks a log-jam that has held up the sale of NBC Universal.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
In response to the letter from Comcast's beltway region Vice President Tom Coughlin ("Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9), it was refreshing to find that you do exist, although your customers have no way of knowing that, especially if they have a service complaint. I have had to talk to people in Panama, Florida, Pennsylvania and finally in White Marsh. I could hardly make out what they were saying, and they had a hard time with me as well. How about some local trouble numbers that will connect to someone here in the Baltimore area immediately?
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
If you're worried about being out of touch while in Ocean City this summer, Comcast wants to ease your mind. Beginning today, visitors and residents can access free WiFi service from Xfinity on smartphones, tablets and other devices at points along the boardwalk and beyond. You don't have to be a Comcast subscriber to tap into the hotspots, which will be available to non-customers at no charge through July 4. A map of hotspots on the cable company's website, showed generous coverage of Ocean City's south end. On the north end, hotspots were located near Northside Park and at 144th Street, just south of the Delaware state line.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
The Maryland attorney general's office is probing whether Comcast Corp. deceptively marketed a maintenance plan and an extra-channels package to customers in four counties, and the Philadelphia-based cable operator was accused of similar violations in lawsuits filed in eight other states yesterday.At issue is whether Comcast violated regulations by automatically charging customers for optional services, such as its "CableGuard" maintenance plan and the "Value-Pak" extra-channels package.Comcast spokesman David Nevins said the two services were routinely included in all of its Maryland cable bills until last year, when new regulations forced the company to start itemizing bills more fully and billing separately for the services.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The Comcast Center is no longer. The University of Maryland's arena will now be called the XFINITY Center, the school announced Monday. “We are excited to place the name Xfinity on this beloved University of Maryland sports venue,” Tom Coughlin, senior vice president of Comcast's Beltway region, said in a news release. “Our Xfinity brand represents our commitment to delivering an unparalleled, innovative entertainment experience to local consumers, and our partnership with the University of Maryland athletics department underscores this promise.” The building opened in 2002 and is home to the Terps' men's and women's basketball, gymnastics, volleyball, and wrestling teams.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
In response to the letter from Comcast's beltway region Vice President Tom Coughlin ("Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9), it was refreshing to find that you do exist, although your customers have no way of knowing that, especially if they have a service complaint. I have had to talk to people in Panama, Florida, Pennsylvania and finally in White Marsh. I could hardly make out what they were saying, and they had a hard time with me as well. How about some local trouble numbers that will connect to someone here in the Baltimore area immediately?
NEWS
July 13, 2014
I am outraged at the assertions made by Tom Coughlin of Comcast in his letter to The Sun ( "Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9). His claims that Comcast operates in a highly competitive market are laughable. Comcast is our only realistic option, and if any one dares to opt out of any of Comcast's services, he/she will see the price for the other services go up. Yes - drop one service in an effort to lower your bill and instead you end up paying more. It is a nasty game that is played out every single time a Comcast promotion ends or a new service is introduced.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
I got about halfway through Comcast's recent letter to the editor and then it started to sound like "small print" and I lost track of what was being said ( "Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9). What was that gobbledygook? This is an example of Comcast's service. Sometime ago I complained about having to pay for extra boxes that originally were promoted as free, smaller than the free government boxes and providing more channels. Using the small box that I paid for I could always get limited basic service that included CNN. That ended with my most recent renewal of service.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
As head of the Comcast region serving Baltimore City, I would like to address and correct inaccuracies about our local offerings in this paper's recent commentary entitled "Faster, cheaper, better broadband in Baltimore" (June 30). Comcast operates in a highly competitive marketplace, and our Baltimore City customers already receive our fastest high-speed Internet and advanced video, voice and smart home technologies. We deliver the same speeds in Baltimore City today as we do across other parts of Maryland, with the same competitive standalone Internet prices and special bundled packages and promotions.
NEWS
By Philip Spevak, Stan Wilson and Anthony Gill | July 1, 2014
There is a monopoly for fast Internet services in Baltimore City. As a consequence, a new Comcast customer can pay as much as $1,000 more over two years for standard "triple-play" service (telephone, Internet and cable television) than would a new customer in Annapolis, where competition exists. And the fastest Internet speed offered by Comcast in Baltimore is only one-third of what is currently available in Annapolis and most of the state. We pay more for less in Baltimore because fast fiber optic technology - often called fiber to the premises (FTTP)
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER | March 2, 2007
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group and Comcast Corp. are in negotiations involving fees that could affect whether millions of cable viewers can watch popular shows such as American Idol, 24 and America's Top Model on their cable systems. The two sides have until March 10 to reach an agreement. Here is a look at some of the issues: What is at the heart of the dispute? Sinclair wants Comcast to pay retransmission fees to carry its programming on the cable system. Comcast has refused, saying its customers should not have to pay for content that is available for free over the airwaves.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Comcast Cablevision subscribers in Baltimore County will begin to see a payoff from the company's $100 million network upgrade by Oct. 30 as the cable franchise adds 20 new or expanded channels to its program lineup.The cable company is expected to announce today that 40,000 customers in neighborhoods where the network has been rebuilt will receive five new and two expanded channels as part of its standard package at no additional cost.The upgrade, which is expected to reach 65,000 of Comcast's 185,000 Baltimore County subscribers by the end of the year, will also add seven pay-per-view channels, three premium channels and three information channels, Comcast spokesman David Nevins said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday. Under the deal -- finalized before Maryland enters the Big Ten conference next Tuesday -- Comcast cable subscribers in the principal markets for Maryland and Rutgers will be able to access the network without subscribing to a separate sports tier.   The network is already available to most local Maryland fans, who often pay a fee added to their cable operators' bills for extra sports programming.
NEWS
By Daniel Lyons | June 10, 2014
The cable company is one entity everyone likes to hate. Perhaps this knee-jerk animosity is to blame for the rush to condemn Comcast's proposed $44 billion merger with Time Warner Cable. Critics complain that combining the nation's two largest cable companies would create a "behemoth" with 30 million customers, nearly one-third the cable/satellite market. But calling this a "cable deal" misunderstands the dynamic nature of the modern video marketplace. America is in the midst of an entertainment revolution, giving consumers more choices than ever.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.