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BUSINESS
July 22, 1994
Contractors become partnersJ. F. Fischer Inc. and Power and Combustion Inc., two local mechanical contracting companies, yesterday announced they have agreed to establishing a partner relationship.The two companies, which will remain separate legal entities, this fall will move into the same location at 7909 Philadelphia Road in Baltimore. Fischer specializes in commercial heating, air conditioning and plumbing while Power and Combustion concentrates on boiler plants, industrial piping and emergency mechanical service.
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NEWS
September 10, 2009
It should come as no surprise that some people living in the vicinity of Key Bridge aren't thrilled by the idea of power plant fly ash showing up at a local landfill. In recent years, the effects of improperly handled coal ash have gotten a lot of attention, from the contaminated wells near a Gambrills landfill to the billion gallons of the stuff that accidentally spilled into the Tennessee River last year. But the question before the Maryland Department of the Environment is whether to allow 7.4 million tons of so-called "coal combustion byproducts" to be dumped in an industrial landfill that was built to higher specifications than the failed Gambrills site and is proposed to be upgraded further.
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NEWS
September 16, 1998
Sixteen volunteer fire companies, including Union Bridge from Carroll County, assisted Walkersville firefighters in Frederick County at 2: 57 p.m. on Monday, responding to a five-alarm barn fire in the 9100 block of Stauffer Road.The blaze, which caused an estimated $100,000 in damage, was brought under control in 90 minutes, said W. Feron Taylor, deputy state fire marshal.The fire was ruled accidental, the result of spontaneous combustion inside one of hundreds of bales and large rolls of hay being stored in the barn, which is owned by Auburn Farms, a limited partnership, Taylor said.
NEWS
By Christopher D. Ringwald | September 14, 2007
ALBANY, N.Y. -- As religious leaders and their congregations go green, they've neglected one Judeo-Christian teaching that could cut energy consumption and pollution by 14.2857 percent. That's one-seventh, just as the Sabbath halts work one day out of the weekly seven. The day of rest - long considered a gift from God - is meant to create a joyful, liberating respite from worldly concerns such as work and consumption, both activities that use the Earth's resources. So renewed observance of the Sabbath could also be a gift to the air, land and water that we consume the other six days of the week.
NEWS
October 6, 1994
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s Wagner plant in Pasadena has been fined $11,250 by the Maryland Department of the Environment for failing an air pollution test last month.One of the smokestacks at the plant was releasing to many too much particulate matter, according to an MDE spokeswoman.The standard is .02 grains of particulates per cubic foot of air, and the unit showed .026 grains. Particulates are the part of the fuel that doesn't burn during combustion."We were surprised we failed," said John Quinn, supervisor of air management in BGE's environmental affairs unit.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
It should come as no surprise that some people living in the vicinity of Key Bridge aren't thrilled by the idea of power plant fly ash showing up at a local landfill. In recent years, the effects of improperly handled coal ash have gotten a lot of attention, from the contaminated wells near a Gambrills landfill to the billion gallons of the stuff that accidentally spilled into the Tennessee River last year. But the question before the Maryland Department of the Environment is whether to allow 7.4 million tons of so-called "coal combustion byproducts" to be dumped in an industrial landfill that was built to higher specifications than the failed Gambrills site and is proposed to be upgraded further.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Fredric A. Nelson Jr., retired owner of a Baltimore sandblasting company, Mensa member and aviator who in retirement learned to drive 18-wheelers and rode dirt bikes, died of cancer Saturday at the Monkton home of a daughter. He was 86. Mr. Nelson was former owner of National Equipment Leasing Corp., a business he established in the late 1940s that specialized in sandblasting steel storage tanks and brick buildings. He retired in 1967. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in Washington and Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Central High School.
NEWS
July 14, 2000
Bad chemistry in article on carbon monoxide This is to clarify the July 10 article "Ailments tied to low-level CO by researchers." The article states "A gas stove or oven exhausts carbon monoxide directly into the kitchen, even when it's working properly." This is not true. If it were true, cooking a meal would qualify as a hazardous occupation and baking something like a turkey could be fatal. The fact is that when a natural-gas-burning appliance is adjusted properly, the products occurring as a result of the combustion of the gas consist of carbon dioxide (not carbon monoxide)
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 14, 1997
50 years agoThe Congoleum plant at Cedarhurst, along the Western Maryland Railroad, suffered its second heavy loss by fire Monday night when the rag warehouse caught fire from combustion. The building was sheet iron and 700 feet long. The first occurred years ago. It was estimated that 300 firemen with 19 pumpers poured water into the rag piles for several hours before it was brought under control. During the height of the fire, flames were visible a mile and a half away, attracting hundreds of spectators.
NEWS
By Bruce Piasecki | January 18, 2001
TROY, N.Y. -- With high gasoline prices and concerns about global warming, we've heard a drumbeat of criticisms of four-ton, 10 mile-per-gallon SUVs. But what we haven't seen front and center will be on display at the Motor Trend International Auto Show in Baltimore this week. Once kept behind the scenes, manufacturers are proudly rolling out models that promise nothing less than an environmental revolution in mass transportation. Aside from the innovative technologies, there are two remarkable features about these new cars.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 15, 2006
Case closed: 24 is the best drama on network TV. That pronouncement may sound overblown given the existence of such higher-rated, quality dramas as ABC's Lost or CBS' CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, or even the over-extended Law & Order on NBC. But after seeing the first four hours of the new season of Fox's 24 -- airing tonight and tomorrow night at 8 -- calling the show anything but the best simply fails to do it justice. Set in Los Angeles, this tightly scripted thriller offers some of the most imaginative and heart-stopping plot twists on television as it tells the tale of a terrorist attack on the United States.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 19, 2005
WASHINGTON Nationals fans are understandably gleeful about the position of their team in the National League East standings, but there is trouble on the horizon. Bank on it. Manager Frank Robinson, who has done a wonderful job turning a terrible situation in Montreal into a terrific early pennant run in the nation's baseball-hungry capital, might have unwittingly opened the Pandora's box that will undo the Nats' exciting season. Maybe you missed it, if you don't stay up real late and have satellite television, but things got a little nasty the past few days in Anaheim, Calif.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
The roots of Detroit's raucous reputation as a sports town go deep. Seventy years ago, Tigers fans pelted St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Joe "Ducky" Medwick with garbage during the seventh game of the 1934 World Series. Provoked by Medwick's mettle on the bases - he had just spiked a Detroit player - the crowd took aim. Bottles, shoes and rotten tomatoes flew at Medwick for 20 minutes. Enough, said baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who ejected the Cardinals Hall of Famer "for his own good."
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 4, 2002
GATORADE is now making water. I know this because I saw a Gatorade commercial that asks the intriguing question: "What if Gatorade made water?" (Intriguing answer: Gatorade will charge you a dollar for a small bottle of it.) The commercial features the usual cast of hyperactive Gatorade people, who have to constantly ingest massive quantities of fluids, or they shrivel up like dead toads on hot asphalt. Gatorade people dehydrate rapidly because they are fanatically dedicated to exercise, and as a result, perspiration-wise, they are human fire hydrants.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 21, 2002
TODAY WE PRESENT an important breakthrough in the continuing effort by research scientists to figure out what, if anything, men are thinking. But first, we have an important warning concerning a worrisome topic that, unfortunately, is very much on our minds these days: pecan safety. This warning is based on an alarming report from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which was written by Heather Ratcliffe and sent in by a number (14 million) of alert readers. The report concerns a Pacific, Mo., couple who -- like so many people -- kept a bucket of pecans in their garage.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Fredric A. Nelson Jr., retired owner of a Baltimore sandblasting company, Mensa member and aviator who in retirement learned to drive 18-wheelers and rode dirt bikes, died of cancer Saturday at the Monkton home of a daughter. He was 86. Mr. Nelson was former owner of National Equipment Leasing Corp., a business he established in the late 1940s that specialized in sandblasting steel storage tanks and brick buildings. He retired in 1967. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in Washington and Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Central High School.
NEWS
By Christopher D. Ringwald | September 14, 2007
ALBANY, N.Y. -- As religious leaders and their congregations go green, they've neglected one Judeo-Christian teaching that could cut energy consumption and pollution by 14.2857 percent. That's one-seventh, just as the Sabbath halts work one day out of the weekly seven. The day of rest - long considered a gift from God - is meant to create a joyful, liberating respite from worldly concerns such as work and consumption, both activities that use the Earth's resources. So renewed observance of the Sabbath could also be a gift to the air, land and water that we consume the other six days of the week.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 5, 2001
Can carrots burn down your house? This urgent question comes up thanks to reader Doug Forand, who writes to describe an alarming discovery he made recently while experimenting with carrots in his microwave oven. (You may be wondering why he was experimenting with carrots in his microwave oven. He had a solid scientific reason: His wife was not home.) Doug claims that if you break a carrot into two pieces, then place the pieces on a plate so they're just touching, then cook them in the microwave, "intense flames will start to shoot out of the carrot at the contact point."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 3, 2002
NEW YORK -- Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi, the father and daughter team of 17th-century Baroque Italy, both painted big, splashy pictures of Bible scenes that look as if they could have come straight off the set of some Hollywood epic filmed in vivid Technicolor hues. So perhaps it's not surprising that the Gentileschis are enjoying a moment of dizzy celebrity these days, a result of the major exhibition of their works that opened recently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The automobile is poised for its most profound change since Karl Benz built the first horseless carriage in 1885. General Motors Corp. offered a peek into the industry's future last week at the Detroit Auto Show when it took the wraps off its prototype hydrogen-fed fuel cell vehicle featuring "drive-by-wire" technology. Analysts said it amounts to the reinvention of the automobile. "Awesome," said David E. Cole, director of the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. "This is a giant leap forward in automotive conceptual thinking."
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