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By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
Edna Holt, confined to a world of silence by profound hearing loss, liked to sit by a large window and watch the birds.But from isolation and depression, she was able to progress to a point at which she could actually hear the birds chirp. And now -- with a little patience and detective work -- she can even carry on a limited conversation with family members and friends.For five years, the 84-year-old resident of the Riverview Nursing Home in Essex had been able to communicate with people only by writing notes.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Researchers led by Johns Hopkins doctors have found that three popular treatments for childhood anxiety disorders are all effective, but that combining an antidepressant with behavioral therapy is the superior treatment. It is estimated that as many as 20 percent of children suffer from anxiety disorders - the most common psychiatric illness in children - which can cause serious problems in school and in relationships. The authors of the study, released online yesterday by The New England Journal of Medicine, said they hope their work will give doctors confidence about the treatments they prescribe and raise awareness of the seriousness of the disorders.
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FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 12, 1991
A combination of two potent anti-cancer drugs appears to halt the progression of the most serious cases of breast cancer in elderly women, according to a government study.Women over age 64 with advanced breast cancer who received the combination treatment lived about seven months longer than women receiving only one of the drugs, reported Dr. James N. Ingle of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.The American Cancer Society projects 175,000 new cases of breast cancer in the United States this year and 44,800 deaths from the disease.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
Doctors have revived a 50-year-old method of delivering chemotherapy, reporting today that infusions through the abdominal wall can add more than a year of life for patients with advanced cases of ovarian cancer. On the downside, the treatment produced side effects so unpleasant that half the patients stopped it early. The report, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, prompted an announcement by the National Cancer Institute that the technique confers "a significant survival benefit" and should be the preferred treatment for women with the advanced disease.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Farber | June 30, 1998
I'VE BEEN thinking about this little puzzle for a while, and finally got around to attempting some of the math. The question is, with all the wealthy Hollywood types who sport their red ribbons on nationally televised awards ceremonies, why are some HIV and AIDS patients in this country still unable to take advantage of the promising triple-drug "cocktails" introduced two years ago.Frankly, I'm morally outraged by this sort of hypocrisy. I don't understand how anyone can justify buying a multimillion-dollar mansion or a $100,000 car when people a stone's throw away are suffering and dying because they can't afford the treatment recommended for their affliction.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has approved the antiviral AIDS drug DDC, but only to be used in combination with AZT, the most widely prescribed AIDS antiviral therapy.Also known as dideoxycytidine and zalcitabine, DDC is the third AIDS antiviral drug to be licensed since 1987, when AZT was approved. Last fall, the FDA approved the antiviral DDI.Antiviral drugs are considered the major tools in the fight against AIDS because they attack the underlying viral condition, rather than the individual infections and other illnesses that result from a damaged immune system.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
Doctors have revived a 50-year-old method of delivering chemotherapy, reporting today that infusions through the abdominal wall can add more than a year of life for patients with advanced cases of ovarian cancer. On the downside, the treatment produced side effects so unpleasant that half the patients stopped it early. The report, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, prompted an announcement by the National Cancer Institute that the technique confers "a significant survival benefit" and should be the preferred treatment for women with the advanced disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1996
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- After weeks of hints that scientists were making remarkable progress in treating AIDS, the results from several studies were released publicly for the first time at an international meeting on AIDS in Vancouver that ended yesterday.Whether people had had AIDS for years or had been infected for a few weeks, combinations of new and older drugs suppressed the AIDS virus below the limits of detection for long periods.But the scientists who conducted the studies and other experts said in interviews that the findings, as dramatic as they are, could not be called a cure.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2004
All right, ladies, here we go again. About 20 months ago, postmenopausal women taking combined estrogen and progestin therapy panicked at the news that a popular hormone pill, Prempro, carried more risks than benefits overall. Some swore off hormones, causing Prempro sales to fall by 66 percent. Some began cutting back on doses or trying different formulations, such as creams or patches, in hopes of improving the risk-benefit equation. Still others stopped, then shopped around for doctors who would put them back on hormones because of intolerable menopausal symptoms.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
The Carroll County Health Department is trying to help a population that has frequently fallen through the cracks of the public health system -- individuals who suffer from both chronic mental illness and drug or alcohol abuse.This month, the department's mental health bureau began a program to treat the "dually diagnosed" by combining elements of mental health and substance abuse therapies."Often treatment is focused on one [problem] or the other," said Howard Held, director of the mental health bureau.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2004
All right, ladies, here we go again. About 20 months ago, postmenopausal women taking combined estrogen and progestin therapy panicked at the news that a popular hormone pill, Prempro, carried more risks than benefits overall. Some swore off hormones, causing Prempro sales to fall by 66 percent. Some began cutting back on doses or trying different formulations, such as creams or patches, in hopes of improving the risk-benefit equation. Still others stopped, then shopped around for doctors who would put them back on hormones because of intolerable menopausal symptoms.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Farber | June 30, 1998
I'VE BEEN thinking about this little puzzle for a while, and finally got around to attempting some of the math. The question is, with all the wealthy Hollywood types who sport their red ribbons on nationally televised awards ceremonies, why are some HIV and AIDS patients in this country still unable to take advantage of the promising triple-drug "cocktails" introduced two years ago.Frankly, I'm morally outraged by this sort of hypocrisy. I don't understand how anyone can justify buying a multimillion-dollar mansion or a $100,000 car when people a stone's throw away are suffering and dying because they can't afford the treatment recommended for their affliction.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1996
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- After weeks of hints that scientists were making remarkable progress in treating AIDS, the results from several studies were released publicly for the first time at an international meeting on AIDS in Vancouver that ended yesterday.Whether people had had AIDS for years or had been infected for a few weeks, combinations of new and older drugs suppressed the AIDS virus below the limits of detection for long periods.But the scientists who conducted the studies and other experts said in interviews that the findings, as dramatic as they are, could not be called a cure.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
The Carroll County Health Department is trying to help a population that has frequently fallen through the cracks of the public health system -- individuals who suffer from both chronic mental illness and drug or alcohol abuse.This month, the department's mental health bureau began a program to treat the "dually diagnosed" by combining elements of mental health and substance abuse therapies."Often treatment is focused on one [problem] or the other," said Howard Held, director of the mental health bureau.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has approved the antiviral AIDS drug DDC, but only to be used in combination with AZT, the most widely prescribed AIDS antiviral therapy.Also known as dideoxycytidine and zalcitabine, DDC is the third AIDS antiviral drug to be licensed since 1987, when AZT was approved. Last fall, the FDA approved the antiviral DDI.Antiviral drugs are considered the major tools in the fight against AIDS because they attack the underlying viral condition, rather than the individual infections and other illnesses that result from a damaged immune system.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
Edna Holt, confined to a world of silence by profound hearing loss, liked to sit by a large window and watch the birds.But from isolation and depression, she was able to progress to a point at which she could actually hear the birds chirp. And now -- with a little patience and detective work -- she can even carry on a limited conversation with family members and friends.For five years, the 84-year-old resident of the Riverview Nursing Home in Essex had been able to communicate with people only by writing notes.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Researchers led by Johns Hopkins doctors have found that three popular treatments for childhood anxiety disorders are all effective, but that combining an antidepressant with behavioral therapy is the superior treatment. It is estimated that as many as 20 percent of children suffer from anxiety disorders - the most common psychiatric illness in children - which can cause serious problems in school and in relationships. The authors of the study, released online yesterday by The New England Journal of Medicine, said they hope their work will give doctors confidence about the treatments they prescribe and raise awareness of the seriousness of the disorders.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Government scientists have abruptly halted a landmark study of hormone therapy for post-menopausal women, saying it increased rather than lowered the risk of heart disease and stroke and raised the chance of breast cancer. Although the chances of a woman developing these diseases remained small, five years on the combination estrogen-progestin therapy raised the risk of stroke by 41 percent, heart attack by 29 percent, cardiovascular disease by 22 percent and breast cancer by 26 percent.
FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 12, 1991
A combination of two potent anti-cancer drugs appears to halt the progression of the most serious cases of breast cancer in elderly women, according to a government study.Women over age 64 with advanced breast cancer who received the combination treatment lived about seven months longer than women receiving only one of the drugs, reported Dr. James N. Ingle of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.The American Cancer Society projects 175,000 new cases of breast cancer in the United States this year and 44,800 deaths from the disease.
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