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NEWS
April 19, 2004
On April 16, 2004 ELIZABETH ANN COLWELL (nee Plasaj) beloved wife of the late Edwin R. Colwell, devoted mother of Bette Hadricky, Patricia Perkins, Joan Sandlin, Linda Malczewski, Helen Anderson, Russell Colwell, Regina Kisner, John Colwell and the late Doris Ziemski and Edwin Colwell, loving sister of Olga Sparkman, Mary Kanis and Helen Burns. Also survived by 24 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Sunday and Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday 10 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart Of Jesus Cemetery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 11, 2007
Until this year, a Maryland Bass Federation member had never made it to the Bassmaster Classic, the sport's signature event. Japan and Zimbabwe have been represented, but not the 70-club federation. Guys came close, but close only counts in things like shaving and the sleeping arrangements in my tent. Now the streak is over, times two. Russ Colwell, a contractor and native of Dundalk, and Kevin Waterman, a plumber from La Plata, qualified for the 37th Classic, a three-day competition that begins Feb. 23 on Lay Lake in Birmingham, Ala. "It's a very difficult thing to do," Maryland federation president Roger Trageser said about securing one of the Classic spots.
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NEWS
July 27, 2003
On July 24, 2003 KELLY K., beloved husband of Carolyn J. Colwell; dear father of Laura Booker, Thomas and Michael Colwell; stepfather of William and Robert Ross; dear son of Elsie Colwell of Middletown, OH; brother of Gladys Perkins of Middletown, OH. Also survived by four grandchildren. Family request friends call at the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home P.A., 4001 Ritchie Hwy on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Services will be held on Sunday evening at 7:30 p.m. Interment private.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
On April 16, 2004 ELIZABETH ANN COLWELL (nee Plasaj) beloved wife of the late Edwin R. Colwell, devoted mother of Bette Hadricky, Patricia Perkins, Joan Sandlin, Linda Malczewski, Helen Anderson, Russell Colwell, Regina Kisner, John Colwell and the late Doris Ziemski and Edwin Colwell, loving sister of Olga Sparkman, Mary Kanis and Helen Burns. Also survived by 24 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Sunday and Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday 10 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart Of Jesus Cemetery.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
Rita R. Colwell's decision not to seek the presidency of a large Alabama university is impressive testimony to the impact she believes the Columbus Center will have on the international scientific community. Few ambitious academics with a flair for administration could turn down a university presidency, least of all for a small research institution that is still two years from coming into its own. The Center of Marine Biotechnology, one of six research and teaching units that make up Dr. Colwell's Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will be the centerpiece of the $160 million complex that bids to become the latest jewel in the Inner Harbor.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 11, 2007
Until this year, a Maryland Bass Federation member had never made it to the Bassmaster Classic, the sport's signature event. Japan and Zimbabwe have been represented, but not the 70-club federation. Guys came close, but close only counts in things like shaving and the sleeping arrangements in my tent. Now the streak is over, times two. Russ Colwell, a contractor and native of Dundalk, and Kevin Waterman, a plumber from La Plata, qualified for the 37th Classic, a three-day competition that begins Feb. 23 on Lay Lake in Birmingham, Ala. "It's a very difficult thing to do," Maryland federation president Roger Trageser said about securing one of the Classic spots.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced yesterday that he will nominate Rita R. Colwell, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, to become the deputy director the National Science Foundation.The federal agency, which has a $3.3 billion annual budget, sponsors research in science and engineering that has no immediate commercial application. Colwell, 63, is the founding president of Maryland's biotechnology institute, which is intended, in part, to foster collaborative efforts between Maryland researchers and start-up companies.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Five weeks after being picked to be deputy director of the National Science Foundation, Rita R. Colwell, the 63-year-old president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will instead be nominated to head the foundation, President Clinton said yesterday.White House officials had formally asked Colwell in January to become the number two official at the foundation, a $3.4 billion-a-year agency that doles out grants for research in physics, biological sciences and engineering.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Staff writers Mark Guidera and Doug Birch contributed to this story | November 3, 1995
Rita R. Colwell, the head of the University of Maryland $H Biotechnology Institute, was passed over yesterday for the president's job at Oregon State University.Dr. Colwell was one of three finalists for the post. The Oregon State Board of Higher Education instead tapped Paul G. Risser, the president of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.Dr. Colwell, who has been a leader in Maryland's high-profile effort to spur biotechnology research in the state, spent the last four days meeting with faculty, students and others at Oregon State.
NEWS
February 18, 1998
THE REST of the United States is about to find out what Marylanders already know. Rita R. Colwell not only possesses one of the best scientific minds in the nation, she is also a top-notch administrator.President Clinton has named Dr. Colwell director of the National Science Foundation. He first asked her to be deputy director, then elevated her nomination when he made the current NSF Director Neal F. Lane his chief White House adviser on science and technology.As head of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Dr. Colwell was a rational voice in discussions last year concerning the Pfiesteria outbreak in the Chesapeake Bay. She urged against prematurely blaming the poultry industry for high nutrient levels in Maryland waters.
NEWS
July 27, 2003
On July 24, 2003 KELLY K., beloved husband of Carolyn J. Colwell; dear father of Laura Booker, Thomas and Michael Colwell; stepfather of William and Robert Ross; dear son of Elsie Colwell of Middletown, OH; brother of Gladys Perkins of Middletown, OH. Also survived by four grandchildren. Family request friends call at the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home P.A., 4001 Ritchie Hwy on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Services will be held on Sunday evening at 7:30 p.m. Interment private.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 28, 1998
Peter P. McCann, former president of an Annapolis-based biotechnology firm, has been named interim president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, officials announced yesterday.McCann, 54, had been president since 1994 of British Biotech Inc., a subsidiary of a British pharmaceutical firm of the same name.He will supervise the institute, a research arm of the University System of Maryland, until a permanent successor to Rita C. Colwell is hired. Colwell, the founding president, left the institute this year after President Clinton nominated her to direct the National Science Foundation.
NEWS
February 18, 1998
THE REST of the United States is about to find out what Marylanders already know. Rita R. Colwell not only possesses one of the best scientific minds in the nation, she is also a top-notch administrator.President Clinton has named Dr. Colwell director of the National Science Foundation. He first asked her to be deputy director, then elevated her nomination when he made the current NSF Director Neal F. Lane his chief White House adviser on science and technology.As head of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Dr. Colwell was a rational voice in discussions last year concerning the Pfiesteria outbreak in the Chesapeake Bay. She urged against prematurely blaming the poultry industry for high nutrient levels in Maryland waters.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Five weeks after being picked to be deputy director of the National Science Foundation, Rita R. Colwell, the 63-year-old president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will instead be nominated to head the foundation, President Clinton said yesterday.White House officials had formally asked Colwell in January to become the number two official at the foundation, a $3.4 billion-a-year agency that doles out grants for research in physics, biological sciences and engineering.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced yesterday that he will nominate Rita R. Colwell, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, to become the deputy director the National Science Foundation.The federal agency, which has a $3.3 billion annual budget, sponsors research in science and engineering that has no immediate commercial application. Colwell, 63, is the founding president of Maryland's biotechnology institute, which is intended, in part, to foster collaborative efforts between Maryland researchers and start-up companies.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Douglas M. Birch contributed to this article | January 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rita R. Colwell, the head of Maryland's biotechnology research center, is expected to be tapped by President Clinton to become one of the nation's highest-ranking science officials, state officials say.Colwell has told associates that she will be named deputy director of the National Science Foundation, a federal agency that subsidizes research in physics and biological sciences.A White House official confirmed last night that Colwell's appointment is "expected to happen."The position would be a career-capper for Colwell, a 63-year-old researcher and administrator who has sought a higher profile in academic and scientific circles.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Douglas Birch contributed to this article | November 5, 1995
Researchers and administrators at the University of Maryland said they were unsettled by the apparent eagerness of the state's top biotechnology officer to seek jobs elsewhere.In the most recent episode, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute President Rita R. Colwell went through four days of interviews as one of three finalists for the presidency of Oregon State University in Corvallis. She ultimately withdrew a few hours before the post was filled.Little known outside of scientific circles, she is considered a leading light nationally in biotechnology for promoting public and private partnerships.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Douglas M. Birch contributed to this article | January 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rita R. Colwell, the head of Maryland's biotechnology research center, is expected to be tapped by President Clinton to become one of the nation's highest-ranking science officials, state officials say.Colwell has told associates that she will be named deputy director of the National Science Foundation, a federal agency that subsidizes research in physics and biological sciences.A White House official confirmed last night that Colwell's appointment is "expected to happen."The position would be a career-capper for Colwell, a 63-year-old researcher and administrator who has sought a higher profile in academic and scientific circles.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
Due to an editing error, an article about a speech by Dr. Rita Colwell in some editions of the Sunday Sun incorrectly explained how women in Bangladesh can use the fabric of their saris to prevent cholera, which is spread by organisms in water. Four layers of the fabric are used to filter drinking water.The Sun regrets the errors.Carrying her young son in her arms, the woman is rushing into a hospital. There, doctors look at his shrunken, wrinkled abdomen. They diagnose him with cholera.Rita R. Colwell showed slides of this boy last night as she warned her fellow scientists that environmental factors are also implicated in the spread of the devastating disease, which is traditionally linked with the man-made problem of raw sewage mixing with drinking water.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Douglas Birch contributed to this article | November 5, 1995
Researchers and administrators at the University of Maryland said they were unsettled by the apparent eagerness of the state's top biotechnology officer to seek jobs elsewhere.In the most recent episode, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute President Rita R. Colwell went through four days of interviews as one of three finalists for the presidency of Oregon State University in Corvallis. She ultimately withdrew only a few hours before the post was filled.Little known outside of scientific circles, she is considered a leading light nationally in biotechnology for promoting public and private partnerships.
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