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NEWS
July 14, 1991
With the U.S. Senate on the way to approving $20 million for the Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Research and Exploration, can the House be far behind? The answer had better be "yes" if this country hopes to compete with Japan and others for leadership in the promising 21st century field of marine biotechnology.Thanks to the clout of Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, her appropriations subcommittee added $20 million for the Columbus Center and then approved a spending bill for the nation's space program and other independent federal agencies.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley drew praise and protesters in Baltimore Tuesday night for his handling of environmental issues. The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Scienc e gave the two-term Democrat an award for his leadership in the long-running effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay and in committing the state to reducing climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions. "Governor O'Malley has listened to science in striving for Chesapeake Bay restoration and sustainable growth in Maryland," Donald F. Boesch, the center's president, said in a release announcing the award.  "His leadership in responding to climate change through energy conservation and transformation has set a national standard.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
The Columbus Center is looking for private donors to give the $20 million it needs to supply scientific equipment for the center's new marine biotechnology labs in Baltimore and to fabricate the educational displays for its Pratt Street exhibition hall."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The dark specks swirling around in big water-filled tanks at the Columbus Center hardly look like fish, much less the kings of the ocean. But from these tiny beginnings, a team of Maryland scientists hopes to unlock the secrets of "farming" Atlantic bluefin tuna, one of the most prized fish on the planet — and one of the most threatened. "For me, it's the Holy Grail," said Yonathan Zohar, a professor of marine biotechnology with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and head of the aquaculture research center at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
Rita R. Colwell's decision not to seek the presidency of a large Alabama university is impressive testimony to the impact she believes the Columbus Center will have on the international scientific community. Few ambitious academics with a flair for administration could turn down a university presidency, least of all for a small research institution that is still two years from coming into its own. The Center of Marine Biotechnology, one of six research and teaching units that make up Dr. Colwell's Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will be the centerpiece of the $160 million complex that bids to become the latest jewel in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit judge approved the sale yesterday of the financially insolvent Columbus Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the University System of Maryland for $650,000.Approving the deal in a brief two-page order, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan overruled an objection to the sale filed by J. Stanley Heuisler, the former head of the marine biotechnology facility, who complained in court papers that the purchase price was too low.John Lippincott, associate vice chancellor of the university, said he was pleased by the decision.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996
The Food and Drug Administration formally signed a lease yesterday for 20,000 square feet of space at the Columbus Center, off Pratt Street and the Inner Harbor, for its Food Safety Research Unit.The lease will run for 10 years. The agency has two five-year extension options.FDA officials said they plan to consolidate several of its seafood research facilities from around the country into the new Baltimore facility as the agency prepares to launch its first national seafood safety inspections program.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | July 26, 1991
The Rouse Co. of Columbia was chosen yesterday to manage construction and development of the $164 million Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration, the first Inner Harbor project in the 1990s for the company that helped transform Baltimore's waterfront in the 1980s.Stanley Heuisler, chairman of the non-profit board planning the project, said the nine-member board voted to hire Rouse to supply the buildingand development management staff to create the multifaceted marine research center.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
The most provocative feature of Baltimore's newest showpiece, a $160 million marine research and education center planned for Piers 5 and 6, is the giant fabric canopy that will cover public exhibits on the building's west side.Whenever designs for the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration have been presented to Baltimore's architectural review board, panelists have raised sharp questions about that canopy:How long will it last? How well will it hold up in cold weather?
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
An article in The Sun yesterday mistakenly attributed a comment about the educational role of the planned Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration to Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin. The remark was made by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes.The Sun regrets the errors.The Inner Harbor's newest attraction will be a scientific extravaganza intended to provide a different learning experience for every visitor who walks through the door.At its center will be a computerized "brain" that will be able to tell whether visitors have been there before and, if so, welcome them back.
NEWS
rusvw13@gmail.com | October 14, 2013
The Assistance Center of Towson Churches (ACTC), adjacent to the Towson Calvary Baptist Church, is getting more than a few upgrades to the one-car garage structure that was built in the 1930s. Members comprising the "Builders Squad," more than 30 volunteers representing numerous churches in the greater Towson area and ranging in age from 21 to 81 years, have made plans to insert a time capsule behind the drywall of the expansion. The capsule, a project initiated by Bob Hoyt, contains photos of the crew, highlights of the construction project, and other relevant artifacts.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
As fish farming grows to feed a world hungry for protein, there's a hitch - the seas are being scoured of the little wild fish to feed the big captive ones destined for the dinner table. Researchers in Baltimore think they may have hit upon a remedy, one that moves aquaculture closer to truly being sustainable. Working at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, a branch of the University System of Maryland, scientists have developed a plant-based fish food that even finny meat eaters like striped bass gobble up. The fish raised on such a nearly vegetarian diet also are healthier to eat, they say, with fewer of the worrisome chemical contaminants that show up in wild or even many farm-raised fish.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
I applaud the article about the best "theme" for the Inner Harbor ("Best theme for the Inner Harbor: water" June 8) and agree that the growing number of residents must be considered. I walk along the promenade frequently and see scores of moms and dads with strollers, office workers headed to work and fellow city boosters. We are all walkers, all residents and all eager to see our city thrive. We have a treasure that we need to promote and to nurture. Waterfront Partnership is striving for a healthy harbor and intends to achieve that goal.
NEWS
By Gilbert Thomas and Klaus Philipsen | June 7, 2011
Jim Rouse's "festival market place" concept for the Inner Harbor, with retail pavilions and entertainment venues, brought with it the retail industry's pattern of re-branding and call for entertaining with ever new "attractions. " This put the harbor into competition not only with malls but also with amusement parks and beach venues — essentially defining it as a place of entertainment and amusement. Maybe it is time to challenge this paradigm. Should really great locations have to reinvent themselves constantly?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Su | January 24, 2011
Not long after Lee Carrion and her partner launched Coveside Crabs in Dundalk five years ago, they realized their seafood business had a serious problem. Up to half of the molting crabs they were holding in dockside tanks to sell as soft crabs died before they could be sold to customers. "I was horrified. I couldn't believe they were dying like that," said Carrion, 50, a former teacher who'd left the classroom to join 54-year-old waterman Richard Young in the crab business. Alarmed by the losses, they methodically tweaked their operations and equipment, and managed to reduce the crab mortality, but couldn't eliminate it. Carrion began to look for help.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A technique developed by University of Maryland scientists for cultivating seafood indoors is slated to get its first real-world tryout under a licensing agreement with a newly formed Baltimore company. The technique, in which fish destined for the dinner table are bred in captivity and raised in large tanks of artificial sea water, has been licensed to a biotechnology startup called Maryland Sustainable Mariculture, University System of Maryland officials say. It's a watershed for Yonathan Zohar and his team of scientists and technicians, who've been working for years to perfect their "recirculating marine aquaculture system" in the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | December 30, 1993
It's too bad the city of Baltimore couldn't have arranged to buy the Harrison's Pier 5 hotel and restaurant complex three years ago, instead of last week.Had city officials gained control earlier, then they may have been able to offer more planning options to designers of the $160 million Columbus Center under construction on the north end of Piers 5 and 6.If the four-story inn at the tip of Pier 5 could have been razed or incorporated in the design of the Columbus Center, for example, the marine research and exhibition complex might have had a stronger presence on the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
The Columbus Center is looking for private donors to give the $20 million it needs to supply scientific equipment for the center's new marine biotechnology labs in Baltimore and to fabricate the educational displays for its Pratt Street exhibition hall."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2010
Baltimore's Inner Harbor has a wide range of attractions for families and acres of open space, planners say, but it doesn't have many quiet outdoor spaces where a mother can take her baby in a stroller or where area residents can relax without running into throngs of tourists. Two local nonprofit groups are working to address that shortcoming by creating a $2 million waterfront park for families living in the Inner Harbor and Harbor East communities. Pierce's Park is the name of a public space that is expected to open by the fall of 2011 on a one-acre parcel on Inner Harbor Pier 5, between the Columbus Center and Eastern Avenue.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Yonathan Zohar beams like a proud parent as he cradles the freshly netted fish in his hands. He didn't catch this glistening branzini. He raised it - and thousands more - in large fiberglass tanks at the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor. "This is a happy moment here," says Zohar, director of the Center of Marine Biotechnology at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. "Green fish, as good as it gets. Clean, environmentally friendly, sushi-quality fish, delivered to the restaurant a few hours after harvesting."
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