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NEWS
June 17, 1998
SOME neighborhoods have a reputation for crime that is worse than they deserve. That has been the predicament of Harper's Choice village in Columbia for too long.Efforts are being made not only to reduce criminal activity but also to improve the area's appearance and vitality. Still, the community must fight the perception -- even among many of its residents -- that it is an unsafe place to live.That issue was discussed last week during a two-day public forum on the remaining crime problems in Harper's Choice.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 26, 2014
The initial results of an economic study of eight of Columbia's village centers identified adding more restaurants as the best future use for the centers, some of which have seen a decline in recent years. "Most of the village centers, from my point of view, are under supplied in restaurants, cafes, formal dining, coffee shops," said Tom Moriarity, the lead consultant on the study, at Tuesday's public meeting held at Slayton House. "People are eating out more often, the millenials, [generation x]
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Anne S. Darrin, a former Columbia village manager, pleaded guilty yesterday to stealing about $65,000 in village funds during a four-year period to pay for personal expenses, ranging from cellular phone bills to aprons for a family-owned restaurant.The embezzlement, which officials put at more than $120,000, focused intense attention on village finances and deepened a rift between the 10 villages and the Columbia Association, which provides much of their funding.The case also highlighted how much the Dorsey's Search Village Board relied on its once-trusted manager.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 6, 2013
Approximately 100 residents filed into the Hawthorn Center in Columbia on Thursday night to ask questions and learn about a study that will recommend future economic uses for eight of Columbia's village centers. "I think it went well. ... We are off to a good start," said Jane Dembner,  chief of Community Building & Open Space for the Columbia Association, who is the lead agency sponsoring the study. The study, which is also being sponsored by the Howard County Economic Development Authority and the county's Department of Planning and Zoning, will look into the current and future economic viability of eight of Columbia's village centers.  The study will also evaluate at the Snowden River Parkway and Dobbin Road corridor, which is home to a number of restaurants, grocers and other retail outlets.  Dembner said the questions on Thursday were "good questions" and ones that are important to be "answered publicly.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
A police investigation of possible embezzlement from a Columbia village center is raising questions about the way the planned community has been governed since it began 30 years ago.Anne Darrin resigned Feb. 27 after 10 years as the Dorsey's Search village manager after a Columbia Association audit showed that about $100,000 may have been misappropriated from Dorsey's Search over several years, according to sources familiar with the document.The allegations -- the first in Columbia since a CA treasurer was convicted of embezzling 20 years ago -- bring to light the fact that the CA knows little about what happens to the $1.3 million it gives annually to the 10 village centers.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2003
As Howard County police search for the person who fatally shot an Oakland Mills man early Saturday, area leaders say that they are concerned about the number of killings in the Columbia village. Terrence Armstead, 34, whose body was found in the 9600 block of Basket Ring Road, is the third person to be killed in Oakland Mills in the past year. All of the homicides happened within two miles of the village center. Four homicides have occurred this year in the county; Howard averages about a half-dozen homicides a year.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Dozens of Columbia's village leaders turned out for a meeting last night with top Columbia Association officials to discuss what has become a tense topic in the 87,000-resident planned community: whether CA should exercise more control over the villages.The consensus among officials from the villages, all of which were represented at the two-hour forum at Owen Brown Community Center, was near unanimous: Let us run our own facilities; spend our money the way we want; and offer input on proposed policy changes before they are made.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Iraq isn't the only place where representative democracy is a tenuous concept. During Saturday's elections for the River Hill Village Board, Mohammad Saleem's name will be the only one on the ballot for four open seats. And once he is elected - if enough voters show up to make the election count - he will be joined by only two other board members, which barely makes a quorum. All of this is creating something of a constitutional crisis in Columbia's most affluent village, which has never had so many open seats and so few candidates.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1997
North Laurel residents -- battling a Columbia-style village the Rouse Co. hopes to build in their area -- fear that the deterioration now seen in Columbia's aging village centers could be the fate of the commercial areas in the proposed development."
NEWS
February 1, 2002
An article published yesterday in the Howard County edition of The Sun should have stated more clearly that there is an average of five to seven homicides every year in Howard County, not just in the Columbia village of Oakland Mills.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
I have been a resident of Columbia since 1976 and always enjoyed the area. I currently reside in Long Reach (since 1991). It was always taken care as all the other villages. I have noticed a steady decline in the upkeep. Trash is strewn everywhere, sidewalks are broken and fallen trees are left to their demise. It is difficult to walk without running into low-hanging tree branches or poison ivy hovering over head. It is really sad to see the area look so downtrodden. It would be nice if some of the Columbia Association funds that we pay could go to take care of some of these issues.
EXPLORE
March 26, 2013
Yesterday, I received a letter from the Columbia Bank announcing that the branch in the Wilde Lake Village Center is closing. I have banked at Columbia Bank for many years ever since it opened its branch in my local village center. So, now, we residents of Wilde Lake have no grocery and no bank in our village center. In short, we do not enjoy the amenities that were envisioned for all residents of Columbia. I might as well be living in some other town, given the need to drive to everything I use on a daily basis.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
The narrow footbridge that crosses U.S. 29 in Columbia opened three decades ago with the promise of connecting the town's commercial center with the residential communities to the east. Today, the underused structure is unlit, encircled in chain-link fence and often covered in graffiti - uninviting to residents looking for a convenient way to cross the five-lane expressway that divides a town planned by renowned developer James W. Rouse, who sought to emphasize connections between its communities.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
As pedestrian bridges spanning highways go, Columbia's version over busy U.S. 29 has all the charm of any urban backwater, swathed in protective fencing, with secluded pathway connections that keep most residents away. "Its current state is disgraceful," said Gregory F. Hamm, Columbia's general manager and master developer General Growth Properties' chief proponent of a 30-year makeover of the planned town's central core. "It looks a little like Guantanamo Bay," said resident and retired planner Philip Engelke.
NEWS
June 13, 2008
Barbara Kellner was placing a catalog order over the phone when it happened. She told the person taking the order that she lived on Phelps Luck Drive. "Oh, you must live in Columbia," the order taker joked. Kellner has heard that line before. A staff member at the Columbia Archives, she often fields calls from residents seeking to find out why their streets are named after such odd things as a stray camel and a green dragon. Kellner, fellow archivist Robin Emrich and Columbia resident Missy Burke have spent the past four years researching the history of Columbia's place names.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | December 17, 2006
Columbia's village centers, which have been relegated to secondary status as officials contemplate the future development of the downtown area, have received an important boost by a distinguished authority on urban planning. Robert W. Burchell, a professor and co-director of the Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University, said it is vital that the county preserve the viability of the village centers and that their future and vitality be central elements of a final plan to transform downtown into an urban center.
NEWS
April 17, 1996
An article in The Sun's Howard County edition yesterday reported incorrectly the Columbia village in which some residents are complaining about the Fairway Hills Golf Club. These residents live along the course in Columbia's Wilde Lake village.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 4/17/96
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
The Long Reach Country Fair has been canceled this year because of expected renovations at the Columbia village's aging shopping center.This September would have been the 18th year for the fair, which in past years has attracted 6,000 to 10,000 people and 60 craft vendors, said Sarah Uphouse, the village manager. The fair is expected to resume next September.The fair was canceled this year because organizers thought it might coincide with the long-awaited renovations at the 120,500-square-foot village center.
NEWS
October 8, 2006
Caution urged on Town Center I'm a senior who has lived in Columbia's Town Center for the past seven years. We seniors like to take things slow. I've been greatly concerned about the rush to overdevelop my neighborhood and inadvertently turn it into Silver Spring. The charrette is just out of control and must be stopped or at least slowed. Carpenters used to say "measure twice, cut once." With so much at stake in Town Center, I must insist that we measure the traffic and other impacts twice before we cut down one tree.
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