Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColumbia University
IN THE NEWS

Columbia University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Karen W. Arenson and Andrew C. Revkin and Karen W. Arenson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 2003
NEW YORK -- Columbia University plans to curtail sharply its financial support for Biosphere 2, the ambitious but troubled effort to simulate Earth's ecology under glass. The university is under contract with the owner of the Biosphere, a 250-acre research center in the desert north of Tucson, Ariz., to manage it until 2010. Three years ago, the university trustees approved $20 million to expand research and teaching programs there until 2005. But those efforts, and the fate of the center, are in doubt, many scientists and officials involved with the partnership said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
The Johns Hopkins University has named Robert C. Lieberman, an interim dean at Columbia University and an expert on American politics, to its No. 2 academic spot: provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. He will take the post July 1, succeeding Lloyd B. Minor, who left last year to become dean of Stanford University's School of Medicine. "Rob brings a scholarly record and leadership experience, clearly marked with the 'excellence gene,' that will make him a wonderful partner for me and the university's senior leadership team as we work to advance our mission," Hopkins' President Ronald J. Daniels said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 19, 1999
Herbert E. Klarman, 82, professor, health economistHerbert E. Klarman, a former Johns Hopkins University professor and noted health economist, died Thursday from complications of lymphoma at Union Memorial Hospital. The Homewood resident was 82.Mr. Klarman was professor in the Hopkins department of public health administration from 1962 to 1969, when he joined the medical faculty of the State University of New York in Brooklyn, N.Y., and later New York University's Graduate School of Public Administration.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 1, 2007
Former Baltimore City Councilman Robert J. Fitzpatrick might be remembered as the guy who got a noise-control law passed in the 1970s. He left town in early 1975 without completing his only term as a member of the council. And he's on the move again. "I've had about 13 different careers," he said one day this week as he stepped down after serving a decade as director of Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art. "I just like to do things I don't know how to do." Born in Toronto, he came to Baltimore as chairman of the Gilman School foreign language department.
NEWS
September 19, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about grand jury secrecy wrongly attributed to Georgetown University law professor David D. Cole a quotation about why secrecy had to give way in the case of President Clinton's videotaped grand jury testimony. The quotation came from Columbia University law professor Gerard E. Lynch.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/19/98
NEWS
October 31, 1995
Terry Southern, 71, whose screenplays for "Dr. Strangelove" and "Easy Rider" captured an anxiety-ridden, rebellious and spaced-out 1960s America, died Sunday of respiratory failure at St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan Sunday night after collapsing while teaching a class at Columbia University.
NEWS
March 6, 1996
Frantisek "Frank" Daniel, 69, a Czech-born filmmaker who made an Academy Award-winning movie and produced about 40 others, died Feb. 28 of a heart attack in Los Angeles. Mr. Daniel, whose "The Shop on Main Street" (1965) won an Oscar, was co-chairman of the film school at Columbia University and artistic director for Robert Redford's Sundance Institute. From 1986 until he retired in 1990, he was chairman of the School of Cinema-Television at the University of Southern California.Carlos Burr Dawes, 93, a developer, conservationist and chairman director emeritus of the Dawes Arboretum, died Sunday in Columbus, Ohio.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2004
Mariam Salari and Shervin Korangy were married on July 3, 2004 at the home of Ms. Salari's family in Lakeland, FL. The traditional Persian ceremony was officiated by Dr. Reza Yasrebi and was followed by a reception at the Vinoy Golf and Tennis Club in St. Petersburg. Ms. Salari is a Literacy Liaison at The School at Columbia University, where she teaches elementary and middle school students and is developing new curriculum for the University. She is a doctoral candidate in the field of Communication and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.
NEWS
August 12, 1993
John G. Gloster Sr.Financial consultantJohn G. Gloster Sr., a native of Baltimore and a financial consultant in Washington to minority businesses, died Friday of cancer at the Washington Hospital Center. He was 65.Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School.He graduated from Amherst College in 1948 and earned a master's degree in political science at Columbia University in 1949 and a master's in business administration at Harvard University in 1955.He held teaching positions at Brooklyn College and at Coppin State College in 1950 and 1951.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
John Hohenberg, 94, former journalism professor, author and Pulitzer Prize administrator, died Aug. 6 in Knoxville, Tenn. A New York City native, he worked as a reporter, editor, foreign correspondent and Washington correspondent for several New York newspapers and United Press before becoming a journalism teacher at Columbia University, his alma mater, in 1948. He taught in the graduate journalism program at Columbia for 26 years, winning the Society of Professional Journalists' distinguished teaching award in 1974.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 6, 2007
It was the end of a busy six-day period for April Yvonne Garrett this week when she moderated a community discussion in East Baltimore about immigration. "Close your eyes," Garrett told those assembled in a room at the Enoch Pratt Free Library branch at Orleans Street and Central Avenue, "and imagine yourself in their position." The people Garrett wanted her listeners to empathize with were the Mexicans they'd just seen in the documentary Al Otro Lado (To The Other Side), which presented the issue of immigration from the point of view of Mexicans who enter the United States -- quite often illegally -- to seek employment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 4, 2007
George C. Keller, a longtime Dickeyville resident and educator who wrote widely about higher education, died Wednesday of leukemia at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 78. Mr. Keller was born and raised in Union City, N.J., the son of immigrants from Germany and Latvia. He left Columbia College after his first year and enlisted in the Navy, where he served as a radar specialist aboard the aircraft carrier USS Valley Forge. He returned to Columbia, where he earned a bachelor's degree in government and political science in 1951.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
Thanks to Spring and Cherry Blossoms Cecile Strauss Hanft and Charles Howard Critchlow were married last evening [Saturday, April 1, 2006 at 6:30 pm] in an interfaith ceremony at the Yale Club of New York. Cantor Kerry Ben-David, Cantor Emeritus of the Scarsdale Synagogue, officiated with Father Mark Lane of the Brooklyn Oratory also participating. The couple first met at an annual Welcome Spring party given by mutual friends and again a few weeks later at an annual Cherry Blossom party given by other mutual friends.
NEWS
July 25, 2004
Elie Abel, 83, a longtime print and broadcast journalist who later led the school of journalism at Columbia University, died Thursday in Rockville of a stroke and Alzheimer's disease. He was probably best known from his years at NBC, where he worked from 1961 to 1969, appearing regularly on the evening news with Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. After serving as State Department correspondent, he was NBC's bureau chief in London from 1965 to 1967 and then returned to Washington as diplomatic correspondent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2004
Mariam Salari and Shervin Korangy were married on July 3, 2004 at the home of Ms. Salari's family in Lakeland, FL. The traditional Persian ceremony was officiated by Dr. Reza Yasrebi and was followed by a reception at the Vinoy Golf and Tennis Club in St. Petersburg. Ms. Salari is a Literacy Liaison at The School at Columbia University, where she teaches elementary and middle school students and is developing new curriculum for the University. She is a doctoral candidate in the field of Communication and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2003
Elliott E. Kanner, a retired library administrator and volunteer coordinator, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure and chronic lymphocytic leukemia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A former Columbia resident, he had been living at Sunrise Assisted Living of Towson since December. He was 73. His wide-ranging career with libraries included developing libraries for Native Americans and overseeing services for a large library consortium north of Chicago. In his active retirement he enjoyed volunteer service that brought him commendations from two Maryland governors.
NEWS
July 25, 2004
Elie Abel, 83, a longtime print and broadcast journalist who later led the school of journalism at Columbia University, died Thursday in Rockville of a stroke and Alzheimer's disease. He was probably best known from his years at NBC, where he worked from 1961 to 1969, appearing regularly on the evening news with Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. After serving as State Department correspondent, he was NBC's bureau chief in London from 1965 to 1967 and then returned to Washington as diplomatic correspondent.
NEWS
December 22, 1993
* Kenneth E. Oberholtzer, 89, former president of the American Association of School Administrators who was nationally recognized for his modernization of public schools, died last Friday in Walnut Creek, Calif. Lauded for his work in updating the Denver public school system, he was featured on the cover of Time Magazine Feb. 20, 1950. Time described his teaching methods as somewhere between "fiery progressivism" and "suave conservatism." Born Dec. 22, 1903, in Carbon, Ind., he was educated at the University of Illinois and Columbia University.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Karen W. Arenson and Andrew C. Revkin and Karen W. Arenson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 2003
NEW YORK -- Columbia University plans to curtail sharply its financial support for Biosphere 2, the ambitious but troubled effort to simulate Earth's ecology under glass. The university is under contract with the owner of the Biosphere, a 250-acre research center in the desert north of Tucson, Ariz., to manage it until 2010. Three years ago, the university trustees approved $20 million to expand research and teaching programs there until 2005. But those efforts, and the fate of the center, are in doubt, many scientists and officials involved with the partnership said.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
John Hohenberg, 94, former journalism professor, author and Pulitzer Prize administrator, died Aug. 6 in Knoxville, Tenn. A New York City native, he worked as a reporter, editor, foreign correspondent and Washington correspondent for several New York newspapers and United Press before becoming a journalism teacher at Columbia University, his alma mater, in 1948. He taught in the graduate journalism program at Columbia for 26 years, winning the Society of Professional Journalists' distinguished teaching award in 1974.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.