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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2005
Jennifer Armour of Shakopee, Minn., is suing R&B star Beyonce for allegedly stealing one of her songs to produce the 2004 hit "Baby Boy." Armour's federal lawsuit, filed this week, accuses the singer of copyright infringement. "The music will definitely speak for itself," Armour said Thursday. Armour's lawyer advised her to deny all requests to hear her original song "Got a Little Bit of Love for You" which Armour says too-closely resembles Beyonce's "Baby Boy." She claims she recorded the song in early 2003 with producer Theo Forest, who then circulated the tune to record labels and other producers looking for songs.
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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
Cal Lampley, a retired musical educator who produced acclaimed jazz and pop records, died Thursday of complications from multiple sclerosis at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The former Ednor Gardens resident was 82. Mr. Lampley, also a composer and pianist, appeared on Maryland Public Television's The Critics' Place, where he reviewed classical music for 11 years in the 1970s and 1980s. "He got tremendous exposure from the show, and nobody ever challenged him on the air because they were afraid of his comebacks," said Don Walls, a fellow critic who reviewed films.
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By Hartford Courant | October 14, 1992
Half-century markers seem to be the big milestones in rock and roll as the once-teen-age genre pushes into middle-age. The 1950s was when the form began to coalesce, after all, and it is the 50th birthday that we celebrate for such heroes as Paul McCartney, Jerry Garcia, and, posthumously, John Lennon and Elvis Presley.Columbia Records dropped the ball when Bob Dylan, one of the most influential figures of the 20th century, not just rock history, turned 50 last year while continuing to tour incessantly.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2005
Jennifer Armour of Shakopee, Minn., is suing R&B star Beyonce for allegedly stealing one of her songs to produce the 2004 hit "Baby Boy." Armour's federal lawsuit, filed this week, accuses the singer of copyright infringement. "The music will definitely speak for itself," Armour said Thursday. Armour's lawyer advised her to deny all requests to hear her original song "Got a Little Bit of Love for You" which Armour says too-closely resembles Beyonce's "Baby Boy." She claims she recorded the song in early 2003 with producer Theo Forest, who then circulated the tune to record labels and other producers looking for songs.
NEWS
May 26, 1999
Kenneth Donald Glancy, 74, former RCA Records president who helped the careers of David Bowie and Cleo Laine, among others, died Sunday in New York. He was in charge of the artists and repertory of Columbia Records, Columbia's European operations and, in the 1970s, all of RCA's labels worldwide.In 1980, he formed Finesse label and issued albums by Mel Torme, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Paul Desmond. He retired in the early 1990s.Retired Vice Adm. John T. "Chick" Hayward, 90, who helped develop the atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II, died Sunday of cancer in Atlantic Beach, Fla. He also developed systems for ground and air-launched rockets and became a pioneer in the development of weapons used to fight submarines.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 21, 1995
The Drifters, one of rock 'n' roll's early groups, will headline "A Month of Sundays," the concert series sponsored by Carroll County Department of Recreation and Parks at 7 p.m. Sunday in Westminster City Park.The four-member group is well-known for its chart topping hits, "Under the Boardwalk," "Up on the Roof," "On Broadway," "There Goes My Baby" and "This Magic Moment."Originally a rhythm and blues group that started in 1953, The Drifters turned to rock 'n' roll by 1956. Members of the group through the years have included Clyde McPhatter, Ben E. King, Billy Davis and Rudy Lewis.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 6, 1992
"Human Touch," the long-awaited new single from Bruce Springsteen, finally shipped to record stores yesterday. But much to the dismay of Baltimore retailers, that shipment never arrived locally."We've had a lot of requests," said Tammy, a part-time clerk at Record & Tape Traders in Towson, who declined to give her last name, "but we haven't had it in our store yet. We're hoping it will be here [today]."Nor were there any Springsteen singles to be found at the Rotunda outlet of Recordmasters.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 6, 1992
"Human Touch," the long-awaited new single from Bruce Springsteen, finally was shipped to record stores yesterday. But much to the dismay of Baltimore retailers, that shipment never arrived locally."We've had a lot of requests," said Tammy, a part-time clerk at Record & Tape Traders in Towson, who declined to give her last name, "but we haven't had it in our store yet. We're hoping it will be here [today]."Nor were there any Springsteen singles to be found at the hTC Rotunda outlet of Recordmasters.
FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2002
For some of us, David Bowie's duet with Bing Crosby on a long-ago holiday TV special was a defining generation-gap moment. So it's hard to accept that the former Ziggy Stardust is promoting his new album with an appearance on Live by Request, a show launched by crooner Tony Bennett on cable's A&E. With everyone waiting for "Young Americans" and "Space Oddity," it's a platform that relies more on nostalgia than the work of an evolving artist. Appropriately, that's also the appeal of Heathen, a beautifully crafted sonic excursion that never quite fulfills its lofty conceptual potential.
NEWS
October 15, 2002
Ray Conniff, 85, the composer, trombone player and bandleader who won a Grammy Award for his recording of the Doctor Zhivago theme "Somewhere My Love," died Saturday at a hospital in Escondido, Calif., after falling and hitting his head. He had suffered a stroke in April. Mr. Conniff had more than 100 recordings and produced 25 Top 40 albums for Columbia Records. He rendered such classics as "Besame Mucho," "New York, New York" and "S' Wonderful" in a career that spanned six decades. He produced 10 gold and two platinum records.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
The Library of Congress has put together 50 of its all-time great sounds, starting with an 1888 waltz and ending with a 1982 rap from Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. The recordings of songs, speeches and radio broadcasts form the beginning of a collection the library is building, called the National Recording Registry, of the most significant recordings in American history. Following is the list of the recordings, as described by the Library of Congress. (Nominations for future additions can be made and fuller descriptions of the list can be found at www. loc.gov/rr/record/nrpb/)
NEWS
October 15, 2002
Ray Conniff, 85, the composer, trombone player and bandleader who won a Grammy Award for his recording of the Doctor Zhivago theme "Somewhere My Love," died Saturday at a hospital in Escondido, Calif., after falling and hitting his head. He had suffered a stroke in April. Mr. Conniff had more than 100 recordings and produced 25 Top 40 albums for Columbia Records. He rendered such classics as "Besame Mucho," "New York, New York" and "S' Wonderful" in a career that spanned six decades. He produced 10 gold and two platinum records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
She dropped out of Columbia University to sign a record deal with Columbia Records, and she hasn't looked back. After jumping from Columbia to Clive Davis' J Records, piano prodigy and singer Alicia Keys recorded Songs in A Minor. And the rest is recent history. The 2001 CD was a smash hit -- especially the song "Fallin' " -- and earned the 21-year-old Keys five Grammy Awards this year. At 7:30 tonight, Keys will perform at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2002
For some of us, David Bowie's duet with Bing Crosby on a long-ago holiday TV special was a defining generation-gap moment. So it's hard to accept that the former Ziggy Stardust is promoting his new album with an appearance on Live by Request, a show launched by crooner Tony Bennett on cable's A&E. With everyone waiting for "Young Americans" and "Space Oddity," it's a platform that relies more on nostalgia than the work of an evolving artist. Appropriately, that's also the appeal of Heathen, a beautifully crafted sonic excursion that never quite fulfills its lofty conceptual potential.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
Powered by new clients and a sales jump in one of its divisions, RWD Technologies Inc. reported record earnings yesterday for the third quarter that ended Sept. 30, but noted some "uncertainty" for the next two quarters. The Columbia provider of technology solutions and manufacturing consulting services for Fortune 500 companies met analysts' estimates, reporting net income of $1.5 million, or 10 cents per share, on revenue of $35.7 million. That's 23 percent more than last year's third-quarter revenue of $29.1 million.
NEWS
May 26, 1999
Kenneth Donald Glancy, 74, former RCA Records president who helped the careers of David Bowie and Cleo Laine, among others, died Sunday in New York. He was in charge of the artists and repertory of Columbia Records, Columbia's European operations and, in the 1970s, all of RCA's labels worldwide.In 1980, he formed Finesse label and issued albums by Mel Torme, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Paul Desmond. He retired in the early 1990s.Retired Vice Adm. John T. "Chick" Hayward, 90, who helped develop the atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II, died Sunday of cancer in Atlantic Beach, Fla. He also developed systems for ground and air-launched rockets and became a pioneer in the development of weapons used to fight submarines.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
Cal Lampley, a retired musical educator who produced acclaimed jazz and pop records, died Thursday of complications from multiple sclerosis at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The former Ednor Gardens resident was 82. Mr. Lampley, also a composer and pianist, appeared on Maryland Public Television's The Critics' Place, where he reviewed classical music for 11 years in the 1970s and 1980s. "He got tremendous exposure from the show, and nobody ever challenged him on the air because they were afraid of his comebacks," said Don Walls, a fellow critic who reviewed films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
She dropped out of Columbia University to sign a record deal with Columbia Records, and she hasn't looked back. After jumping from Columbia to Clive Davis' J Records, piano prodigy and singer Alicia Keys recorded Songs in A Minor. And the rest is recent history. The 2001 CD was a smash hit -- especially the song "Fallin' " -- and earned the 21-year-old Keys five Grammy Awards this year. At 7:30 tonight, Keys will perform at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 11, 1999
Anyone who enjoys listening to classical music knows that the classical division of the recording industry is in trouble -- at least in the United States. Compared to sales of pop records, classical sales have always been a tiny part of the industry's revenue. But never have they been so small as they are now. As high as five percent as recently as the late 1980s, they are currently estimated between one and two percent of total sales. And that figure takes into account the occasional "crossover" blockbusters that feature team-ups such as the "Three Tenors" or cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 21, 1995
The Drifters, one of rock 'n' roll's early groups, will headline "A Month of Sundays," the concert series sponsored by Carroll County Department of Recreation and Parks at 7 p.m. Sunday in Westminster City Park.The four-member group is well-known for its chart topping hits, "Under the Boardwalk," "Up on the Roof," "On Broadway," "There Goes My Baby" and "This Magic Moment."Originally a rhythm and blues group that started in 1953, The Drifters turned to rock 'n' roll by 1956. Members of the group through the years have included Clyde McPhatter, Ben E. King, Billy Davis and Rudy Lewis.
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