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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
Columbia Management Inc. and merchants associations from seven Columbia village centers joined to raise about $3,000 for food, clothing and toys for about 12 needy families this holiday season.CMI, which operates and markets Columbia commercial and retail projects owned by the Rouse Co., donated about $1,500 from seasonal leases. Two crafts vendors -- Chez Sarita and Touch of Youth -- leased space from CMI for about six weeks for the holiday season at the Wilde Lake and Long Reach village centers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
For years, dining in Howard County has been characterized by family atmosphere, and if adults wanted a night on their own, they'd suddenly find themselves right at the top of the price ladder. There haven't been enough of those in-between places. Then came the opening a few months ago of affordable but chic Facci in Laurel, whose crazy and instant success suggested two things: that there had been a great desire for moderately priced, sit-down places that aren't part of a big chain, and that kids are fine going to places that aren't for kids.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
It's been a rocky road for owners of Sundaes ice cream and yogurt shop in the Dorsey's Search Village Center, who say a Rouse Co. subsidiary is trying to evict them because they don't turn a big enough profit."
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
Although little new information was shared, Columbia Association board members considered Gregory F. Hamm's attendance at their board meeting a promising start. Hamm, General Growth Properties Inc. regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, attended his first association board meeting Thursday night and talked about downtown redevelopment. "This was progress because it was an open meeting in which General Growth Properties engaged directly with the Columbia Council," said Evan Coren, a board member who represents Kings Contrivance village.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Renovations of the Owen Brown Village Center are scheduled to get under way as early as next year.Officials at Giant Food -- which operates the center through its GFS Realty subsidiary and has a supermarket there -- said yesterday they plan to abandon the center's somewhat enclosed structure for a more open style, similar to a strip mall.They have proposed moving the Chevy Chase Bank building now at the front of the center to a vacant storefront and removing the dark-brown awnings that cover some of the center's storefront windows.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
For the past year, Maisy Ota has traveled several miles from her home in Clary's Forest to shop in Wilde Lake, Oakland Mills, Dorsey's Search and Catonsville.Now she is minutes away from Columbia's newest village center in Hickory Ridge."This is just wonderful," said the 80-year-old woman during Wednesday's grand opening, which featured jazz bands from Atholton and Hammond high schools, puppet shows and face painters."It's much more convenient," said Hickory Ridge resident Linda Brightfield, echoing the sentiments of many shoppers at the new center.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | September 2, 1992
Howard County residents are responding in their own ways to help Hurricane Andrew victims in Florida. While some offer prayers during church services, others are collecting and asking for donations at work.Several local businesses, meanwhile, are pooling their resources and banking on the goodwill of residents to send truckloads of food, clothing and other items to South Florida.Brickhouse Farm Water Co., a 2-week-old business near Clarksville, sent more than 5,000 gallons of bottled water yesterday to a Red Cross distribution center in Miami.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
The Howard County Center of African American Culture opened an exhibit last Sunday honoring prominent Howard Countians.But don't tarry. Both the exhibit and most of the center could be heading back into Wylene Burch's basement soon."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | February 22, 1992
The controversial Straight drug treatment program is facing eviction and a barrage of financial problems that may force it out of Maryland.The Columbia program has lost half its clients since August, according to Straight's officials.Also, court papers show that the treatment center has paid no rent to its landlord since arriving in Maryland six months ago. The $42,726 it owes is "just another example of the madness going on here," said a Straight program administrator, asking not to be identified.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Investigators say a two-alarm fire that caused extensive structural damage to the Bryant Woods Neighborhood Center and an adjacent pool building early yesterday was set."We've determined the cause to be arson," said Bob Thomas, deputy chief state fire marshal. "At this point, we have no suspects for the arson fire, nor do we have a clear motive."State fire officers removed evidence from the scene yesterday and sent it to the State Police Crime Laboratory in Pikesville for analysis, Mr. Thomas said.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
An executive with nearly 20 years of experience in planning and development has replaced a veteran Rouse Co. vice president in heading up downtown development in Columbia, General Growth Properties Inc. announced this week. Gregory F. Hamm, 45, has become regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, taking over for Douglas M. Godine, who has served as first vice president, development, with responsibility for Columbia, since March of last year. "I look forward to learning Columbia," said Hamm, who has been a consultant for General Growth and has had an office in Columbia for more than a year.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE and CHARLES JAFFE,MARKETWATCH | May 7, 2006
Mutual fund firms shuffle the deck and merge funds out of existence all the time. But when Columbia Management announced recently that it would fold 11 funds into eight of its other offerings, it showcased the range of scenarios - from best to worst - that investors can see when management deals new cards. If any of your funds ever goes through a merger, the Columbia situation has a case study for you. That study starts with some background. Columbia Management is the fund arm of Bank of America, running more than $361 billion in 90 funds.
NEWS
By Megan Watzin and Megan Watzin,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
Throngs of teen-agers looking to have a good time Friday night crowded outside the Wilde Times Cafe in Wilde Lake Village Center, shivering in the cold, and unable to gain admission to the sold-out reopening of the teen-operated coffeehouse. Wilde Lake High School students have been working with their adult advisers since the cafe lost its lease in the spring, trying to put the pieces together to reopen. The long wait produced pent up demand. The first night's show, which included performances by five local teen-age bands, quickly sold out. A half-hour after the 7 p.m. opening, the building had reached its capacity of 75 people.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
The vice chairman of the Columbia Horse Center advisory committee has resigned, questioning the competence of Columbia Association officials, who oversee the management and finances of the troubled facility. Daniel P. Bednarik -- the second committee member to resign this month after a staff shake-up -- said troubles at the horse center may be symptomatic of a larger problem at the Columbia Association, which provides services and operates facilities for city residents with a budget near $50 million.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Renovations of the Owen Brown Village Center are scheduled to get under way as early as next year.Officials at Giant Food -- which operates the center through its GFS Realty subsidiary and has a supermarket there -- said yesterday they plan to abandon the center's somewhat enclosed structure for a more open style, similar to a strip mall.They have proposed moving the Chevy Chase Bank building now at the front of the center to a vacant storefront and removing the dark-brown awnings that cover some of the center's storefront windows.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1996
Columbia's first pharmacy will close its doors today in what some residents view as a sign of the decline of Columbia's village centers and their founding philosophy.But Joe Yousem, owner of the Pharmacy at Wilde Lake, says his move from the 29-year-old pharmacy is more the result of increasingly stingy insurance companies. Independently owned pharmacies are finding it harder to turn a profit at a time when the health-care industry is cracking down on costs, he said.Still, for Linda Nedzbala, a 29-year Harper's Choice resident, the closing of the pharmacy -- where Yousem knows most everyone by name -- is a symbol.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
Directors of a dance studio and a preschool displaced by the Aug. 2 fire at the Bryant Woods Neighborhood Center say they are determined to bounce back quickly."
NEWS
By Megan Watzin and Megan Watzin,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
Throngs of teen-agers looking to have a good time Friday night crowded outside the Wilde Times Cafe in Wilde Lake Village Center, shivering in the cold, and unable to gain admission to the sold-out reopening of the teen-operated coffeehouse. Wilde Lake High School students have been working with their adult advisers since the cafe lost its lease in the spring, trying to put the pieces together to reopen. The long wait produced pent up demand. The first night's show, which included performances by five local teen-age bands, quickly sold out. A half-hour after the 7 p.m. opening, the building had reached its capacity of 75 people.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs tTC and Adam Sachs tTC,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
The struggling Harper's Choice Village Center -- once a hub of activity but now viewed by many as unsafe, inconvenient and outdated -- has suffered two more blows.A sandwich shop closed recently and a pizza shop is leaving soon.The closing of Subway Sandwiches and the pending departure of Little Caesar's Pizza marks further decline for the troubled West Columbia shopping center.John and Nell Murray, the pizza shop's owners, said it wasn't just a lack of customers that led to the closing of their unprofitable store, but also their landlord, the Rouse Co., Columbia's developer.
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